0x800703E3 installing Windows Update Agent

Discussion in 'Windows Update' started by Darryl, Jan 21, 2010.

  1. Darryl

    Darryl Guest

    Here you go.

    Filter Name Num Instances Frame
    ------------------------------ ------------- -----
    PROCMON20 0 0
    sr <Legacy>
     
    Darryl, Jan 29, 2010
    #21
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  2. Darryl

    MowGreen Guest


    Interesting is an understatement, Robert. Something really hinky is
    going on here which may be stemming from a hardware issue. Heck, it may
    even be related to how the drive(s) are partitioned.
    I've never seen this with the installation of the WUA before.


    MowGreen
    ================
    * -343-* FDNY
    Never Forgotten
    ================

    banthecheck.com
    "Security updates should *never* have *non-security content* prechecked
     
    MowGreen, Jan 29, 2010
    #22
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  3. Darryl

    MowGreen Guest

    There are no mini filters present from the installation of Trend, just
    Process Monitor and the Legacy System Restore filter.

    How many Hard Drives and how many partitions does the drive(s) have,
    Darryl ?
    How much free space is available on C:\ and D:\ ?
    Automatic updates are stored in the WINDOWS directory but will be
    unpacked and installed from the drive with the most free space available.

    Frankly speaking, I've never seen this issue when installing the WUA
    before. There may be something amiss with the partioning/provisioning of
    the HD, there are bad sectors of the HD, or failing RAM involved.
    Also, I don't get why there are Write attempts to F:\.

    What is F:\ ?

    I'm going to fire up a Virtual instance of XP and run ProcMon while
    installing the latest release of the WUA and compare the log to the one
    from your system. Hang in there.


    MowGreen
    ================
    * -343-* FDNY
    Never Forgotten
    ================

    banthecheck.com
    "Security updates should *never* have *non-security content* prechecked
     
    MowGreen, Jan 29, 2010
    #23
  4. Darryl

    Darryl Guest

    Mow, the machine has 2 physical disks.

    Disk 0 has 2 partitions: C: and F:
    - C: is 32GB, with 3GB free
    - F: has 37GB, with 20GB free

    Disk 0 has one partition, D:
    - D: has 149GB, with 126GB free

    Originally, I only had disk 0, and it was partitioned into C: and D:. C:
    was the OS and I did my work on D:. But I kept running out of space on C:,
    so I added a new disk to be my work disk. To keep things the way they were,
    I assigned the original D: to be F:, and assigned the new disk to be D:. I
    then uninstalled/reinstalled my biggest applications (Office, Visual Studio,
    etc) from C: to D: to free up as much space as possible on C:. It still has
    only a little space, but I figured 3GB ought to be enough for Windows
    updates, etc.

    My CD-ROM is E:.

    If it matters, I also have configured page files to be on both D: and F:,
    where there is a lot of free space (so no page file on C:).
     
    Darryl, Jan 29, 2010
    #24
  5. Darryl

    MowGreen Guest

    Unless you've mistyped it, it's hard to believe that both drives were
    assigned the number 0. The D:\ drive should be Disk1.

    Was a 3rd party tool used to rename D:\ to F:\ and did the updating
    correlate with the installation of the new HD or did it occur after the
    upgrade of Trend ?

    From what I've seen in the ProcMon log from my VPC of XP, the ProcMon
    log from your system is showing many more BUFFER OVERFLOWS. In fact,
    there was just one in the ProcMon log from the VPC of XP.

    C:\ is being used only for the Windows directory, correct ? If so, you
    can recover a great deal of disk capacity by removing the uninstall
    subfolders of Service Packs, the backup of SP3 located at
    WINDOWS\ServicePackFiles\i386, and the uninstall subfolders of installed
    updates.
    If you have the original XP installation CD you can slipstream SP3 to it
    so as to be able to reinstall XP SP3 before removing the
    ServicePackFiles\i386 subfolder.

    Slipstreamed Windows XP CD Using SP3
    http://www.theeldergeek.com/slipstreamed_xpsp3_cd.htm

    Save Space After Installing Updates
    http://www3.telus.net/dandemar/spack.htm

    Though the question still remains as to the paths issue which appears to
    be part of or entirely the cause of the failure of the WUA to install.


    MowGreen
    ================
    * -343-* FDNY
    Never Forgotten
    ================

    banthecheck.com
    "Security updates should *never* have *non-security content* prechecked
     
    MowGreen, Jan 29, 2010
    #25
  6. Darryl

    Darryl Guest

    Yes, sorry, drive D: is on disk 1. That was a copy & paste error on my part.

    The regular Windows Disk Management applet was used to reassign the drive
    letters. That was done a year or more ago, but the Trend (since uninstalled)
    update was within the last couple months.

    C:\ has the OS, and some other apps. But I don't install anything new on it
    because of disk space issues. Do you think the problem has to do with
    insufficient space on C:, and that I should try to free up more space there?
     
    Darryl, Feb 1, 2010
    #26
  7. Darryl

    MowGreen Guest

    *** Can you manually download and manually install updates ? ***


    Freeing up space on C:\ is worth a shot Darryl, but I don't think it's
    going to resolve the WUA installation issue if it's stemming from a
    path's issue.

    1) Remove all of the update uninstall subfolders.
    2) Remove the ServicePack subfolders.
    3) Clean the WINDOWS\temp and your UserAccount's temp subfolders *after*
    first restarting the system to ensure that anything in said subfolders
    is no longer needed.
    4) You could even back up the Windows\Installer subfolder to a CD or
    external HD, too, if it's grown to an unwieldy size. Then move either
    it's contents or the required .msp/.msi back when upgrading/updating
    installed software.

    " If you have the original XP installation CD you can slipstream SP3 to
    it so as to be able to reinstall XP SP3 before removing the
    ServicePackFiles\i386 subfolder.

    Slipstreamed Windows XP CD Using SP3
    http://www.theeldergeek.com/slipstreamed_xpsp3_cd.htm

    Save Space After Installing Updates
    http://www3.telus.net/dandemar/spack.htm "


    MowGreen
    ================
    * -343-* FDNY
    Never Forgotten
    ================

    banthecheck.com
    "Security updates should *never* have *non-security content* prechecked
     
    MowGreen, Feb 1, 2010
    #27
  8. Darryl

    Darryl Guest

    Well, I think I'm going to throw in the towel and repave this machine, Mow.
    I want to thank you for all the help and sticking with me for all this time
    and trying to figure this one out. You went above and beyond!
     
    Darryl, Feb 3, 2010
    #28
  9. Darryl

    MowGreen Guest

    You're mowst welcome, Darryl. At least we gave it a shot. Trust me, it
    was a pleasure working with someone who provides relevant information
    instead of having to be constantly prodded for it.


    MowGreen
    ================
    * -343-* FDNY
    Never Forgotten
    ================

    banthecheck.com
    "Security updates should *never* have *non-security content* prechecked
     
    MowGreen, Feb 3, 2010
    #29
  10. Darryl

    Darryl Guest

    Well finally, I'm back in business. I booted the Windows CD and did a
    repair. Went pretty smoothly; did have to hunt down a driver file (.MOF?)
    for the network card. Luckily was able to find it on the internet.

    After everything was done, had a nasty problem with activation that took me
    a few days of Googling to solve: when I logged in, it said I had to activate.
    Clicked OK and then nothing happened; just showed the desktop. Turns out
    that activation requires IE8. Had to download the IE8 installer from another
    machine, burn it onto a CD, go into safe mode on the problem machine, and
    install it. Upon rebooting after the IE8 install, the activation dialog came
    up, hooray! This is the thread that showed me this solution, in case anyone
    else hits the problem:
    http://social.technet.microsoft.com...p/thread/b991ce21-db5b-46eb-8c9b-f8d4aa14a35a

    Once past that, ran Windows Update and installed 65 updates (since SP3)
    without a hitch. Didn't lose a thing; my files, programs, desktop and all
    settings are just as they were. Whew! Now if only I could get back all the
    hours I spent to get back to normal ;)
     
    Darryl, Feb 10, 2010
    #30

  11. More likely just a repair of whatever IE you had. Unfortunately
    comprehensive repairs are hard to find and uninstalling and reinstalling IE
    is sometimes impossible; so, yes, installing a higher level version of IE
    could have been a sufficient repair for your case.


    ---
     
    Robert Aldwinckle, Feb 12, 2010
    #31
  12. Darryl

    smartbear Guest

    Ran into this problem on Server 2003 SP2 and none of about 6 other proposed
    solutions worked. No, I didn't have antivirus software running. This is how
    I ultimately was able to "fix" this.

    Find the right standalone Windows Update installer, in my case it was the
    3.0 version for Server 2003.

    Run the installer and watch for the temp directory it creates before
    displaying the Next button in the wizard. If you miss it, just look for a
    recently created GUID directory off the root of the drive it was unzipped on.

    Go into this directory, and you'll see a number of .dll files that
    correspond to those in the windows system directory.

    As a sanity check, use explorer to check the file properties of wuweb.dll in
    the system directory and the wuweb.dll in the unzip directory, and compare
    the file versions. Make sure you're installing later versions of these
    files. Or it might be easier to just check the windowsupdate.log file - it
    records the file versions in the previous failed installs.

    Now copy each of the .dll files in the unzip directory to a new directory.
    In addition to these files, there are .exe, .cpl and language enabled files
    you'll need to copy. The language enabled files will need to be copied to
    the appropriate filename, e.g.:
    wuaucpl.cpl.mui_en => wuaucpl.cpl.mui

    Then for each of the files in your new directory, copy the existing system
    files off somewhere, e.g.:

    md backup && for %a in (*.*) do copy \windows\system32\%a backup

    Boot to a safe mode command line and copy the new set of files into the
    system directory. At this point you can run the windows update installer
    again and check the windowsupdate.log file again - I missed one file doing
    this and it pointed out the one I'd missed. If you copied the files
    correctly the log will show there was nothing to do.

    Yes, this is a PITA, but if I done this in the first place instead of trying
    the various proposed "solutions" it would have saved me several aggravating
    hours. I don't, however, know if this removes the underlying problem or
    whether it might happen again on the next attempted update.

    Eric
     
    smartbear, Mar 8, 2010
    #32
  13. ...I didn't have antivirus software running. This is
    Not having "antivirus software running" is why you needed to fix it!
     
    PA Bear [MS MVP], Mar 9, 2010
    #33
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