2007 VPC to run Win7-64 bit?

Discussion in 'Virtual PC' started by jim-g, May 29, 2009.

  1. jim-g

    jim-g Guest

    My machine is dual-quad 64 bit HP with Vista 32 bit Home-Ultimate on it and
    my first attempts to start up a 32 bit VHD. I'd like to try out Win7 on the
    VHD but don't know if it is dependent on the VPC being 64 bit or whether the
    win7 runs off the hardware as 64 bit?

    If I have to, the 32 bit ver of Win7 can be downloaded to run.

    Any thoughts ?

    Jim
     
    jim-g, May 29, 2009
    #1
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  2. Jim:

    Virtual PC does not support 64-bit guests, even on 64-bit host OS.

    VMWare workstation does support 64-bit guests, even on 32-bit host (provided CPU
    is 64-bit of course).
     
    David Wilkinson, May 29, 2009
    #2
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  3. If your OS is 32bit, install the 32bit version of VPC. No version of
    VPC allows you to run 64bit VMs.

    You need Hyper-V or another VM program to do that.
     
    Steve Jain [MVP], May 29, 2009
    #3
  4. jim-g

    jim-g Guest

    Thanks a lot fellas..... Jim


     
    jim-g, May 29, 2009
    #4
  5. jim-g

    jim-g Guest

    What do you think of the "virtualBox" in comparison to WMware?
     
    jim-g, May 29, 2009
    #5
  6. It's a great value for the price, free. Can't beat it!

    It's pretty close to VMWare. I've got both installed, along with VPC,
    but I usually use VMWare for my Linux needs over VBox. No special
    reason other than I'm used to the interface and, in my experience, the
    VM Tools is easier to work with in VMWare than VBox.
     
    Steve Jain [MVP], May 29, 2009
    #6
  7. jim-g

    jim-g Guest

    Great....nice to see such flexibility. Thanks again. Jim
     
    jim-g, May 29, 2009
    #7
  8. jim-g

    SaGS Guest

    Another solution is to install Windows 7 to boot natively on your hardware
    from a VHD, without using any virtualisation solution, yet still without the
    need to repartition the physical disk. See
    http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/2953-virtual-hard-drive-vhd-file-create-start-boot.html
    See also the FAQ at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd440865.aspx

    Disadvantage:

    - You cannot run your current Vista and Windows 7 *at the same time*. A
    reboot is needed to switch between them.

    Advantage:

    - Run Windows 7 natively, with access to all your hardware (the real
    graphics card, access to USB devices, etc).
    - You can install either of, or both, 32- or 64-bit versions (dual/ triple
    boot with Vista).
    - You can test Windows Virtual PC 7 and the Virtual XP Mode (I'm pretty sure
    these cannot run if Windows 7 itself runs in a VM).
     
    SaGS, May 30, 2009
    #8
  9. But, VPC7 does not allow 64bit VMs.
     
    Steve Jain [MVP], May 30, 2009
    #9
  10. jim-g

    SaGS Guest

    Yes, but the scenario I described runs Windows 7, be it 32- or 64-bit,
    natively on the physical computer without using any virtualization solution.
    It's a dual-boot, but without the inconvenience of repartitioning the hdd.
    And when running Win7 natively, one can test Win VPC 7 and the "XP Mode", a
    thing that's not possible when running Win7 in a VM.

    I posted my previous message because the OP writes about "try out Win7 on
    the VHD" and "attempts to start up a 32 bit VHD". I thought she/he might
    have heard about the new capability in Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008
    *R2* to be installed/ boot from a VHD, and maybe she/he thought this is
    connected to VPC and virtualization. It's not: the VHD file is used instead
    of a disc partition, but that's all.
     
    SaGS, May 31, 2009
    #10
  11. jim-g

    jim-g Guest

    Thanks again guys.......Here's what I did:

    Stayed with 32-bit and used VirtualBox and loaded both Win7 and Ubuntu
    Linux.

    Everything works well in both programs especially in Win7 without all the
    other programs I'd normally load it up with 'after' I told the gues to load
    to a higher resolution that VBox used.

    1 problem though is that Ubuntu doesn't have an option in it to go higher
    than 800X600. Which is a problem as Firefox is larger in the window than
    the window is sized.
    Do you know a way to get that window larger than what the guest sizing will
    take it too?

    I did do a full size window with the V-Box but the Guest (Ubuntu) won't take
    advantage of it.

    Jim
     
    jim-g, Jun 1, 2009
    #11
  12. jim-g

    jim Guest

    Thanks for the info SaGS. At this point, I've used V-Box with the 32
    bit and it works fine. One does have to have the RAM to handle it. The
    reason so far is to try some things in win7 as well as Linux.

    As Steve pointed out, V-box and linux do have their problems and I'm
    working through them although 'some' of their instructions are vague
    like fog regarding 'sharing' of files between the VHD and a dir on the
    Vista.
    Jim
     
    jim, Jun 2, 2009
    #12
  13. jim-g

    BL Muzzy Guest

    I installed the 64 bit version of VPC 2007 on 64 bit windows 7 and it
    defaults to installing in c:\program files (x86)\... which seems odd. I
    tried it there and in c:\program files\... and in neither case would it load
    a .vhc made on a 32 bit XP system. Anybody know about either of these two
    oddities?

    Bob
     
    BL Muzzy, Jun 3, 2009
    #13
  14. jim-g

    Bill Grant Guest

    It installs in the x86 folder because it is a 32-bit app. The difference
    between the 32 & 64 versions are to accommodate the different requirements
    of the host OS. Neither will run 64-bit clients.

    By .vhc did you mean .vhd or .vmc? It is never a good idea to transfer
    ..vmc files between systems. You should be able to create a new vm using an
    existing .vhd file.
     
    Bill Grant, Jun 3, 2009
    #14
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