bandwidth limit

Discussion in 'Windows Vista Drivers' started by serge, Oct 27, 2004.

  1. serge

    serge Guest

    Hello,

    Is it possible to limit bandwidth using NDIS IM driver?
    How?

    Thanks...

    Best regards,
    Serge.
     
    serge, Oct 27, 2004
    #1
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  2. serge

    Pavel A. Guest

    Pavel A., Oct 28, 2004
    #2
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  3. serge

    serge Guest

    Hello, Pavel!
    You wrote on Thu, 28 Oct 2004 02:03:56 +0200:

    PA> Visit www.ndis.com

    I visited it, and found no information about original question:

    Thanks.

    Best regards,
    Serge.
     
    serge, Oct 28, 2004
    #3
  4. Yes, surely. Put the packets to the queue, and then deliver them via
    timer-based intervals. Drop the packets at all if the queue starts to be too
    long.

    Look in FreeBSD's "dummynet" source for a logic sample.
     
    Maxim S. Shatskih, Oct 28, 2004
    #4
  5. serge

    serge Guest

    Hello, Maxim!

    Thanks for your answer.

    MSS> Yes, surely. Put the packets to the queue, and then deliver them
    MSS> via timer-based intervals. Drop the packets at all if the queue starts
    MSS> to be too long.

    MSS> Look in FreeBSD's "dummynet" source for a logic sample.

    I want to have constant traffic bandwidth for certain IP addresses.
    Let's say, I want to download 700 MB file with 33K bps on 100 MBit channel.
    We can not 'cache' the file for certain reasons.

    Windows will lost connection if I drop some packets...

    Best regards,
    Serge.
     
    serge, Oct 28, 2004
    #5
  6. Windows will lost connection if I drop some packets...

    It will not if all is done properly. Study the FreeBSD's "dummynet" source for
    a sample, and reimplement the same logic in Windows via NDIS IM.
     
    Maxim S. Shatskih, Oct 28, 2004
    #6
  7. serge

    Pavel A. Guest

    This site will give you an idea how to properly write intermediate drivers.
    Then you'll know how to do your task (that's, to delay sending packets
    to stay in your specified bandwidth). The rest is up to your creativity.

    Good luck,
    --PA
     
    Pavel A., Oct 29, 2004
    #7
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