Can I install a single copy of Vista Ultimate on more than one PC?

Discussion in 'Windows Vista General Discussion' started by SartyMcfly, Jun 21, 2007.

  1. SartyMcfly

    SartyMcfly Guest

    I was wondering if someone can help! I have just brought a copy of Vista
    Ultimate for my Media centre PC but waould also like to install it on my
    notebook. I've heard you can install a copy of Vista Ultimate on more than
    one PC so long as its the same persons. Any truth in this??? I hope so!!!
    :)
     
    SartyMcfly, Jun 21, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. No you will need to buy another copy for your notebook.
    Read your End User License Agreement

    Just run WINVER and click the link to read it.
     
    Mike Brannigan, Jun 21, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. You can only install the software on 'one' machine. If you have two
    machines, you buy two copies.

    --
    John Barnett MVP
    Associate Expert
    Windows - Shell/User

    Web: http://xphelpandsupport.mvps.org
    Web: http://vistasupport.mvps.org

    The information in this mail/post is supplied "as is". No warranty of any
    kind, either expressed or implied, is made in relation to the accuracy,
    reliability or content of this mail/post. The Author shall not be liable for
    any direct, indirect, incidental or consequential damages arising out of the
    use of, or inability to use, information or opinions expressed in this
    mail/post..
     
    John Barnett MVP, Jun 21, 2007
    #3
  4. SartyMcfly

    KristleBawl Guest

    If it's a retail version (not OEM preinstalled on a new computer) then, yes,
    you can 'install' it, but you will not be able to register or activate it
    until you purchase another "key" for each machine.

    KB

    "SartyMcfly" wrote in message
    news:...
     
    KristleBawl, Jun 21, 2007
    #4


  5. No, no truth at all. The rule is quite clear. It's one copy (or one
    license) for each computer.

    There's nothing new here. This is exactly the same rule that's been in
    effect on every version of Windows starting with Windows 3.1. The only
    thing new, starting with Windows XP and continuing with Vista, is that
    there's now an enforcement mechanism.
     
    Ken Blake, MVP, Jun 21, 2007
    #5
  6. SartyMcfly

    ls [sb] Guest

    on little interesting thing ... With MS Office, you can (not sure with 2007,
    but pretty darn sure you were allowed with older vers*). You were allowed
    to install on a primary desktop, and one laptop. (but not two desktops).

    but that's about the oldy peice of software I can think of that has legally
    allowed such. definately not windows.

    --

    * a quick google gives the following
    http://www.utexas.edu/its/sds/microsoft/office2003.html
    Applications in the Microsoft Office System (e.g. Office XP Professional,
    Office 2003 Professional, Publisher 2003, etc.) can be installed on two
    systems. Per the Office End-User License Agreement:
    1.1 Installation and use. You may:
    (a) install and use a copy of the Software on one personal computer or other
    device ; and
    (b) install an additional copy of the Software on a second, portable device
    for the exclusive use of the primary user of the first copy of the Software.
     
    ls [sb], Jun 22, 2007
    #6

  7. Never listen to that source again. It's very unreliable.

    No, of course not.

    You need to purchase a separate Vista license for each computer on
    which you install it.

    Just as it has *always* been with *all* Microsoft operating
    systems, it's necessary (to be in compliance with both the EULA and U.S.
    copyright law http://www4.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/117.html), if not
    technically) to purchase one Vista license for each computer on which it
    is installed. (Consult an attorney versed in copyright law to determine
    final applicability in your locale.) The only way in which Vista
    licensing differs from that of earlier versions of Windows (up until
    WinXP, that is) is that Microsoft has added a copy protection and
    anti-theft mechanism, Product Activation, to prevent (or at least make
    more difficult) multiple installations using a single license.

    With Vista Ultimate, it's sometimes possible to qualify for
    additional licenses, at a reduced cost:

    Windows Vista: Windows Vista Family Discount
    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/products/windowsvista/buyorupgrade/familydiscount.mspx


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. -Benjamin Franklin

    Many people would rather die than think; in fact, most do. -Bertrand Russell
     
    Bruce Chambers, Jun 22, 2007
    #7
  8. You should have been a bit more specific, Bruce. It is possible to
    install Vista on more than one machine. But doing that opens you to the
    crappy, buggy DRM that MS employs on it's products. This means it may
    only work for a short time before it goes into reduced functionality
    mode under any additional installs.
    Noone needs to do this. They need to eat, to breath, but they don't
    need to purchase vista licenses.
    Oh, you are a lawyer now? Where and when did you achieve your law
    degree? What was your specialty?
    Ah yes, the "spread em at our command" and "pound you in the arse" software.
    Now this information actually makes sense.

    --
    Priceless quotes in m.p.w.vista.general group:
    http://protectfreedom.tripod.com/kick.html

    Most recent idiotic quote added to KICK (Klassic Idiotic Caption Kooks):
    "They hacked the Microsoft website to make it think a linux box was a
    windows box. Thats called hacking. People who do hacking are called
    hackers."

    "Good poets borrow; great poets steal."
    - T. S. Eliot
     
    The poster formerly known as Nina DiBoy, Jun 22, 2007
    #8
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.