Clock malfunction

Discussion in 'Windows Vista Performance' started by jshann, Jun 29, 2008.

  1. jshann

    jshann Guest

    I am having issues with my clock. It seems that everytime I close my laptop
    the clock freezes in time. When it is open it also seems like it loses time.
    I have to continually update it to get the correct time but if I close my
    laptop or if my internet drops the signal, it stops working. Does anyone have
    any helpful info on what is either wrong/what I can do to fix it?
     
    jshann, Jun 29, 2008
    #1
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  2. jshann

    JerryM Guest

    Usually when a clock loses time, the motherboard battery need changing.
     
    JerryM, Jun 29, 2008
    #2
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  3. jshann

    damocles Guest

    I had this last week.....on my tablet pc (xp) laptop. A cold boot solved
    the problem.

    Not sure what caused it though.
     
    damocles, Jun 29, 2008
    #3
  4. jshann

    Nonny Guest

    No.

    That battery is only there to support the BIOS when all other power is
    removed... as in when a desktop is unplugged from the outlet or the
    laptop battery is removed or becomes totally discharged.
     
    Nonny, Jun 29, 2008
    #4
  5. jshann

    JerryM Guest

    What you say is true,
    But where do you suppose the clock is located?
     
    JerryM, Jun 29, 2008
    #5
  6. jshann

    Nonny Guest

    What's that got to do with anything? Think about your question a bit
    more.
     
    Nonny, Jun 29, 2008
    #6
  7. jshann

    JerryM Guest

    OK, I guess I'm thinking that the clock is controlled by the BIOS, enlighten
    me!

    <Snip>
     
    JerryM, Jun 29, 2008
    #7
  8. jshann

    Nonny Guest

    If it's controlled by the BIOS, then why do XP and Vista have built-in
    functions that are meant to keep it accurate? Why are there numerous
    little programs available that will sync the clock to the atomic clock
    source of your choosing? Surely, none of those are part of the BIOS.

    You have attributed a slow clock to the mobo BIOS battery. I have
    told you that only works when all power sources OTHER THAN that
    battery are disconnected - and then only if that battery is failing
    (which is a rare occurrence these days).

    Conclusion: when one or more (as in the case of a laptop) of those
    power sources are connected, and the clock is running slow... then
    it's a different cause.

    What is that cause? I ain't got a clue. I've not had that problem,
    so I've never had to research it.
     
    Nonny, Jun 29, 2008
    #8
  9. jshann

    Nonny Guest

    If it's controlled by the BIOS, then why do XP and Vista have built-in
    functions that are meant to keep it accurate? Why are there numerous
    little programs available that will sync the clock to the atomic clock
    source of your choosing? Surely, none of those are part of the BIOS.

    You have attributed a slow clock to the mobo BIOS battery. I have
    told you that only works when all power sources OTHER THAN that
    battery are disconnected - and then only if that battery is failing
    (which is a rare occurrence these days).

    Conclusion: when one or more (as in the case of a laptop) of those
    power sources are connected, and the clock is running slow... then
    it's a different cause.

    What is that cause? I ain't got a clue. I've not had that problem,
    so I've never had to research it.
     
    Nonny, Jun 29, 2008
    #9
  10. jshann

    JerryM Guest

    OK, Nonny,

    I was just going by fixes from the past, where a failing clock was fixed by
    replacing the battery on desk tops, I don't have a clue how to fix a laptop
    computer.
    I was thinking they all operated pretty much the same.

    Thanks,
    Jerry
     
    JerryM, Jun 29, 2008
    #10
  11. jshann

    Charlie Tame Guest

    Charlie Tame, Jun 30, 2008
    #11
  12. jshann

    PaulB Guest

    The battery absolutely powers the clock when the computer is not connected to
    an external power source. It is synced to time sources because the clock on
    the motherboard is not designed to maintain time as accurately as an atomic
    clock.
     
    PaulB, Jun 30, 2008
    #12
  13. When the OS is not running then the CMOS battery is powering the clock and
    With respect, you've just repeated the same mistake. The CMOS battery
    powers the clock ONLY when:

    1/ The external power to the computer is switched off or removed

    2/ (In the case of a laptop) the laptop battery is removed

    Only then does the little button cell on the mobo take over. Whether the OS
    is running or not isn't relevant.

    Unfortunately, I can't explain the odd symptoms the OP is experiencing.
    However, I seem to think that Windows does NOT use the mobo clock all the
    time - I believe it keeps track of time internally. Presumably this is what
    is malfunctioning. As damocles says, perhaps a cold boot will sort it out.

    SteveT
     
    Steve Thackery, Jun 30, 2008
    #13
  14. jshann

    Shane Nokes Guest

    I'm an engineer.

    Both you and Nonny are wrong.

    The battery still maintains the RTC functionality on modern PC's.

    When that battery is running low it causes the RTC to slow down.

    Replacing that battery is the fix.


    Here's a quick test for you both.

    Power down the PC (but leave it plugged in)

    Pull the battery.

    Reboot the PC.

    Voila the BIOS settings are all set to default and the time is wrong.

    Hmm how could that be if that little battery wasn't still running the RTC?

    *sighs*

    Why do people always insist on posting wrong info :(
     
    Shane Nokes, Jun 30, 2008
    #14
  15. jshann

    Mick Murphy Guest

    " I ain't got a clue."
    You don't have a clue about anything, idiot!
     
    Mick Murphy, Jul 1, 2008
    #15
  16. jshann

    Charlie Tame Guest

    That has always been my experience, although one might expect the 3V
    standby on ATX supplies to be used to supplement the battery power it
    seems they don't bother.
     
    Charlie Tame, Jul 1, 2008
    #16
  17. jshann

    JerryM Guest

    OK, Nonny,

    I think I see your reasoning about the clock,

    If an operator has power on 24-7 with no shutdowns,
    The clock should never run down, RIGHT?

    However when ever you close the lid on a laptop or shutdown a desktop,
    The power to the motherboard is OFF.
    The cmos battery now has to maintain all the basic settings, and over a
    period of time will run down.
    As the battery weakens the clock loses time.
    These batteries are not rechargeable.
    These batteries are usually good for about 5 years on an average PC.

    I hope I make sense to you with my thinking,

    Jerry
     
    JerryM, Jul 1, 2008
    #17
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