Convert protected wma's to mp3 or .m4a (AAC) for use in i-Pod using the easiest, least complicated t

Discussion in 'Windows Media Player' started by audiohead, Sep 4, 2005.

  1. audiohead

    audiohead Guest

    I'm not a computer genius by any means, but through a lot of trial and
    error, persistence, and a little luck I figured out how to easily
    convert protected (DRM) WMA'a into high quality MP3 and ACC (for i-Pod
    use) music file formats.

    You need Windows Media Player v10 and i-Tunes v4.7, and two additional,
    inexpensive, readily available software programs that you can download
    or purchase via storefront.

    I created this tutorial/manual because I downloaded a hundred songs
    from musicnow.com and then learned the hard way that I could not play
    these protected wma's on my $400.00 i-Pod. I was pissed and decided to
    do something about it.

    Check out the details at http://home.earthlink.net/~magnel709j
     
    audiohead, Sep 4, 2005
    #1
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  2. audiohead

    Zarax Guest

    This is most likely a scam, please refrain from using such lowly methods of
    advertising in a technical support newsgroup.
     
    Zarax, Sep 4, 2005
    #2
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  3. audiohead

    audiohead Guest

    Would it be so lowly if I offered this information for free? I spent
    hundreds of dollars and hours figuring this out because I had five
    hundred plus DRM wma music files that I wanted to import to i-Tunes. I
    posted this information because there is obviously a need for it.

    Why don't you order the manual and find out first hand if it's a scam
    or not? If it doesn't work for you send the manual back to me and I'll
    give you your $19.95 back.
     
    audiohead, Sep 4, 2005
    #3
  4. audiohead

    Zarax Guest

    If you want to put it this way there are two things to consider:

    1) if you use get around tricks like burning+recompressing or something like
    that you're going to have a lower quality "copy" of the file you bought, not
    really something many people would like imho

    2) if you use some kind of software to break the encryption (unlikely to be
    effective with the later DRM versions since there is no notice of breaks in
    the update encrypted code) then you're violating the DCMA, and so committing
    a crime.

    Because of the potential consequences listed before, it is my duty to inform
    the users about them.

    That said, the I-pod is tied with I-tunes, if you spent 400 bucks on it
    after you bought hundreds of WMA songs I really have to say that it's not
    really a bright choice, since there are several devices that can play DRMed
    WMA for less saving you money and work.
     
    Zarax, Sep 4, 2005
    #4
  5. audiohead

    audiohead Guest

    Some additional things to consider:

    If you want to know the "tricks" you have to buy the manual. There's no
    compression involved and there's negligible decrease in file size. The
    file size on disk actually increases when DRM .wma is converted to
    ..m4a. Here's an example of file size from a DRM .wma conversion.
    Original DRM .wma file (3,559,424 bytes); conversion to .mp3 (3,530752
    bytes); and to .m4a (3,584,000 bytes). There is no degradation in
    sound quality. If you can tell the difference in sound between these
    music files then you're not human and are likely of the Canine variety.


    There is no software out there, except maybe in Bill Gates' vault that
    can break the DRM encryption. It would take the best code breakers in
    the world and a supercomputer running 24/7 for a few years to break
    this code. I neither have access to Mr. Gates' vault nor to a
    supercomputer.

    I never really was an i-Pod fan until I discovered the seamless
    interface, and simplicity between i-Tunes and i-Pod. It's a beautiful
    thing. I have several mp3/wma players that I don't need anymore. If
    you want them, there yours.

    No one hates being scamed or ripped off more than I do. If my product
    didn't work for me 100% I wouldn't be selling it. There actually still
    are a lot of legitimate sellers out there in cyberland that have
    morals. I can understand your reservations. I've also had a few bad
    experiences buying on the net. Like I said before if my conversion
    process doesn't work for you I will refund your money.

    I just started selling this system a few weeks ago and I already have
    dozens of satisfied customers. For every negative, jealous,
    unbelieving response I get on these forums I'm selling three Conversion
    Kits.

    Thank you for pointing out these "things to consider". Now, your only
    duty left is to buy the Conversion Kit.
     
    audiohead, Sep 5, 2005
    #5
  6. audiohead

    audiohead Guest

    Nothing to say about this? Good. Hope you can now move on to something
    more constructive like troubleshooting.
     
    audiohead, Sep 6, 2005
    #6
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