Defrag Details in Vista

Discussion in 'Windows Vista Performance' started by Jon, Apr 5, 2007.

  1. Jon

    Jon Guest

    Hi. I was wondering how I could see the details of my disk fragmentation in
    Vista Home Premium. I recently had my computer go through a full diagnostic
    at Best Buy and it said that my disk was 26% fragmented with a suggestion
    that it stay below 10%. I was wondering if there was anything in Vista that
    would allow me to see the percentage so I can defrag to keep under the 10% or
    if I need a third party program.
     
    Jon, Apr 5, 2007
    #1
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  2. Jon

    Ghost Rider Guest

    if you do need another prog, may i suggest,
    Auslogics Disk Defrag,
    http://www.auslogics.com/disk-defrag/

    its free

    ghost
     
    Ghost Rider, Apr 5, 2007
    #2
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  3. From an elevated command prompt:
    Defrag <vol>: /a /v
    Or
    Defrag <vol>: /a
    (for less verbose output. The statistic you're concerned about, % file
    fragmentation, will be in either report).

    Defrag should be scheduled to run automatically once per week on Wednesday
    night when your computer is idle and not asleep.
    See All Programs->Accessories->System Tools->Disk Defragmenter to check your
    schedule.

    If your computer is never idle+not asleep, you can run defrag manually from
    the command prompt (defrag /? for details)

    -Victoria
     
    Victoria House [MSFT], Apr 5, 2007
    #3
  4. Victoria

    Users are not interested in statistics.. they want bars and little squares
    to watch.. it doesn't matter that one would require 4 billion more squares
    in the Win 9x family or a 5 mile long bar in XP to portray accurately what
    is happening.. just a few thousand will do as long as the user can see
    something moving about.. :)


    --


    Mike Hall
    MS MVP Windows Shell/User
    http://msmvps.com/blogs/mikehall/
     
    Mike Hall - MS MVP, Apr 5, 2007
    #4


  5. Ahhh, I see. :)
     
    Victoria House [MSFT], Apr 5, 2007
    #5
  6. Jon

    Cal Bear '66 Guest

    Or a progress bar, or a percentage, anything but a meaningless spinning thingy.
     
    Cal Bear '66, Apr 5, 2007
    #6
  7. Jon

    Robert Moir Guest

    But the way defraggers work just about *anything* except the beginning and
    end reports might as well be a "meaningless spinning thingy" for all the
    good it does you.

    I've said it before and I'm sure I'll say it again; if you want to watch
    something while your computer is defragmenting then put on a movie or visit
    youtube.com or something
     
    Robert Moir, Apr 5, 2007
    #7
  8. Jon

    Cal Bear '66 Guest

    I prefer to defrag at the end of the day, and would like to know when, or
    approximately when, I can turn the computer off and go to bed.

    I was hypnotized by the moving multicolored boxes, but, yes indeed, it
    would be nice to know just how badly fragmented the drive is before I
    proceeded with defragmenting, and a report of how successful the process
    was after completion.

    One Care (free with purchase of Vista) gives you a percentage, but it doesn't
    tell you which drive, and only after it completes it's whole optimizing routine, can
    you see which drives completed. C: ALWAYS fails (too defragmented, will
    try again the next time One Care optimization runs).
     
    Cal Bear '66, Apr 5, 2007
    #8
  9. Jon

    Rock Guest

    Just set it to run automatically at a time you're not using the system. What
    is the big deal?
     
    Rock, Apr 6, 2007
    #9
  10. I have a laptop at home running Vista. When I get home I turn it on and I
    use it intermittently until bed, when I turn it off. Last night I think I
    heard it defragging while I was watching The Office (a very good episode).
    This took me zero effort. And you know what? Even if I turned the computer
    off before defrag completed, defrag would've picked up again the next day
    while I was in the bathroom, or cooking dinner, or doing laundry. I've never
    seen my fragmentation level go above 5% when I've bothered to check it,
    which is rare.

    Give Vista a chance to do this task while you're doing better things with
    your time. Give it a month, see how you like it.

    --
    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

    Want to learn more about Windows file and storage technologies? Visit our
    team blog at http://blogs.technet.com/filecab/default.aspx.


    I prefer to defrag at the end of the day, and would like to know when, or
    approximately when, I can turn the computer off and go to bed.

    I was hypnotized by the moving multicolored boxes, but, yes indeed, it
    would be nice to know just how badly fragmented the drive is before I
    proceeded with defragmenting, and a report of how successful the process
    was after completion.

    One Care (free with purchase of Vista) gives you a percentage, but it
    doesn't
    tell you which drive, and only after it completes it's whole optimizing
    routine, can
    you see which drives completed. C: ALWAYS fails (too defragmented, will
    try again the next time One Care optimization runs).
     
    Jill Zoeller [MSFT], Apr 6, 2007
    #10
  11. Victoria, I may have an answer for you.

    Back when XP first can out, I did an internet search for Defraggers, because
    all my friends kept asking which they should use. I tested a few and I came
    up with only one really good defragger. I had been using Norton's Speed
    Disk, but when XP came out with NTFS and Symantec couldn't or wouldn't keep
    up. Finally, I discovered PerfectDisk. The thing the PerfectDisk did that
    few, if any, of the others, did was provide a means to defrag the system
    files during boot up (because that's the only time that the system files
    could be moved). I've been using PerfectDisk ever since. As for your
    percentage question, my external drive is always defragged to 0%. My C:
    drive, because the Operating System is always moving a few files around
    while the defrag is going on, will usually finish with 0.1 or 0.2 percent.
    The finished results folder will even show you which files are still
    fragmented, what their size is, and into how many fragments they are divided
    into. Usually, it's a file I wouldn't even have known existed if it wasn't
    listed in the results. There is one tab in the folder for System file
    fragmentation results and another tab for regular files. You can give it a
    30 day free try and see for yourself. That's what I did. And, by the way,
    it's Vista friendly. Oh, yea. The display, while running, looks just like
    Norton's Speed Disk did. I've also found their tech support to be very
    good, even when you ask them dumb questions, which I have a habit of doing
    from time to time.

    If you're interested, here's the link...
    http://www.raxco.com/products/downloadit/perfectdisk_download.cfm
     
    William Beard, Apr 6, 2007
    #11
  12. Jill

    I wasn't joking when I explained to Victoria that people like to see Defrag
    work..

    It is not enough that Vista does the best defrag job of any before it, and
    the people don't question that part.. they have gotten used to see Defrag
    work, and they miss it.. you may well think that it is arcane behavior to
    sit and watch defrag, but millions have be doing it for years, and they miss
    it..


    --


    Mike Hall
    MS MVP Windows Shell/User
    http://msmvps.com/blogs/mikehall/
     
    Mike Hall - MS MVP, Apr 7, 2007
    #12
  13. Jon

    David Guest

    I would like to second the notion that people like to watch little squares or
    bars move around the screen. I am one of them. I understand that a
    percentage indicating progress is never going to be accurate with Vista's
    optimisations but surely the visual representation was pretty close? It
    would at least indicate potential length of time, a lot of red and you know
    it's going to take a while.

    David.
     
    David, Apr 7, 2007
    #13
  14. Jon

    Robert Moir Guest

    OK, imagine this: You've opened defrag and resized the screen to 640x480,
    which on a 22" monitor like mine is a tiny tiny square in the corner. You
    own one of those new 750GB hard disks. Got that? Good. Now...

    What is the correct scale to draw out the visual representation of that disk
    onto that defrag window and still provide meaningful, useful information?

    I can see why people would *want* some kind of indicator, I've asked for one
    myself even though as I've said repeatedly I'd much rather go watch a film
    (or go for a hike as I will when I finish this reply) than watch a disk
    defrag. But given the scenario I present above, OK it's a little contrived
    but it does illustrate at least one of the problems with trying to 'show'
    defrag data.
     
    Robert Moir, Apr 7, 2007
    #14
  15. David

    It isn't even in the same ball park really.. :) there would need to be many
    more squares and a bar the length of the Golden Gate bridge to get even
    close to accuracy, but it was an indicator..

    Vista defrag works well actually, and the idea of watching an indicator is a
    little arcane.. unfortunately, many have gotten used to seeing something,
    and the concept of defrag in the background is alien to them.. there is no
    doubt that having no indicator should improve productivity, but the worry
    that nothing is happening seems to trash productivity anyway.. :)


    --


    Mike Hall
    MS MVP Windows Shell/User
    http://msmvps.com/blogs/mikehall/
     
    Mike Hall - MS MVP, Apr 7, 2007
    #15
  16. Jon

    rja.carnegie Guest

    Most modern defragmentation tools, including this I believe, use a
    built-in Windows API provided specifically for this task(?) Or they
    claim so, anyway. But that doesn't mean they're all the same.

    I agree that users like to see something happening, although I'm happy
    with statistics. I do like them to be real statistics.

    Could a separate utility just show how Windows' own defrag is
    proceeding in Vista? Can you use Performance Monitor for that?

    Currently I'm partway through the following exercise:

    1. Not Vista but Windows XP Tablet - back up the entire system volume
    (used sectors) to a compressed image file. Done for free with Knoppix
    5.1.1 download bootable Linux CD and the partimage tool included.

    This part was annoying because the estimated time kept jumping around
    by + - five minutes!

    2. Defragment and compact the system volume, so that all files are at
    one end of the volume.

    This is also annoying. The computer is a Samsung Q1 UMPC handheld
    tablet with an 800x480 screen and a low-power processor, and the tool
    that I think I used before - since as far as I know XP's own Defrag
    doesn't do compact, anyway it /didn't/ - is "DefragNT", apparently not
    touched for a few years - and it seems to like to crash. It promises
    my data are safe because it uses the Windows defrag API - it looks
    okay - I'm crossing my fingers. I did /make/ a backup -

    And I think the defrag tool market is overpriced for occasional users.
    I'd like to pay, I dunno, $5 when I want to use a professional tool
    once. There are short-term trials but of course they expire.

    So it looks like Auslogics is worth trying.

    This prepares for the next step -

    3. Resize the system partition to 10 GBytes.

    4. Format the now-unused disk space as a second volume on the same
    physical disk.

    Windows XP doesn't make it easy to back up the system partition for a
    simple restore, as far as I can tell. It's a dark art, and most
    people say that when you lose data, you should format the disk and
    reinstall. And then load all of the patches and service packs.

    My goal is to resize Windows itself and format the rest of the disk as
    a separate volume, which can include the /next/ Knoppix backup of the
    Windows system partition as well as data files conveniently arranged.

    At the same time, I can set Windows to make the second partition
    appear as a sub-folder of the system partition in one or more places.
     
    rja.carnegie, Apr 14, 2007
    #16
  17. Jon

    rja.carnegie Guest

    But on reading further I find allegations, unproved, that I don't
    like:
    - Its wbsite was or is associated with software in the "spyware"
    category, specifically "ThemeXP".
    - It heavily promotes the company's retail products. Okay, so does
    Windows...
    - When you attempt to uninstall it, it contacts its home server
    online. If this is blocked then the program does not uninstall.

    That's what has been said.

    Well, here's another alternative to look at:

    http://www.kessels.com/JKDefrag/

    Ah, it has a mode specifically for people who intend to resize the
    partition!
     
    rja.carnegie, Apr 14, 2007
    #17
  18. It isn't free, but take a look at PerfectDisk at www.raxco.com. It is
    what Norton's Speed Disk would have become if Symantec hadn't gotten
    their money-grubbing hands on it.

    PerfectDisk allows you to do a boot-time defrag of system files and lets
    you defrag your disk via schedule. It will also analyze the disk for
    you and make a recommendation of whether the disk needs defragging
    and/or boot-time defrag.

    Regards,

    Turner
     
    Turner Morgan, May 1, 2007
    #18
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