Destination Folder Access Denied

Discussion in 'Windows Vista Security' started by Sumit Ghai, Mar 22, 2007.

  1. Sumit Ghai

    Sumit Ghai Guest

    I want to rename one of the folders I created in Computer > Local Disk (C:),
    but when I go to rename it and press enter, I get a message saying
    "Destination Folder Access Denied...you need permission to perfom this
    action". I'm the administrator on the computer, seeing how it is my laptop.
    This doesn't happen for all the folders I have created though. Any way to
    play around with the security settings so I can rename my own folder?
     
    Sumit Ghai, Mar 22, 2007
    #1
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  2. Sumit Ghai

    Jesper Guest

    Yes. You need modify permissions on the folder itself. See the directions I
    just posted in the "Folder gives me no permissions???" thread. It is not
    exactly like your problem, but you can modify those steps to do what you need.
     
    Jesper, Mar 22, 2007
    #2
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  3. Sumit Ghai

    Sumit Ghai Guest

    Unfortunately, that didn't work. I went through all the steps, and nothing.
    I do have to point out that where you said to click on "Edit" the first time
    around, there was not shield on the button. Could that mean something? I
    have already disabled UAC.
     
    Sumit Ghai, Mar 22, 2007
    #3
  4. Sumit Ghai

    Jesper Guest

    If you have already disabled UAC then you have (a) turned off much of the
    security in the OS, and (b) would already have access if you are an admin.
     
    Jesper, Mar 22, 2007
    #4
  5. Sumit Ghai

    Sumit Ghai Guest

    That's what I would think, too. How do I check to make sure I actually am
    the admin on my own computer?
     
    Sumit Ghai, Mar 22, 2007
    #5
  6. Sumit Ghai

    Jesper Guest

    drop to a command line and run whoami /all /fo list
     
    Jesper, Mar 22, 2007
    #6
  7. Sumit Ghai

    Sumit Ghai Guest

    Under "User Information", it has "sumit-hp\sumit"....shouldn't that be
    adminstrator? Does this mean I'm not logged in as admin? How do I change
    that? Sorry for asking these kinda stupid questions. On my old computer, I
    never bothered with user accounts and things like that.
     
    Sumit Ghai, Mar 22, 2007
    #7
  8. Sumit Ghai

    Jesper Guest

    Under "User Information", it has "sumit-hp\sumit"....shouldn't that be
    No, Administrator is the name of an account. You are an administrator, but
    not _the_ Administrator. The Administrator (not capitalization, BTW), is
    disabled.
     
    Jesper, Mar 22, 2007
    #8
  9. Sumit Ghai

    Sumit Ghai Guest

    That's strange then, because when I look at User Accounts under the Control
    Panel, I'm listed as "Administrator". I'm just confused now.
     
    Sumit Ghai, Mar 23, 2007
    #9
  10. Sumit Ghai

    Jesper Guest

    You are AN administrator. That is what the control panel is telling you. You
    are not THE Administrator. There can be several administrators, but there is
    an account called "Administrator," and a group called "Administrators".
    Anyone who is a member of the Administrators group is an administrator. The
    Administrator is a legacy account that still exists, but is no longer used.
    In most cases, it is disabled by default on Vista.
     
    Jesper, Mar 23, 2007
    #10
  11. Sumit Ghai

    Sumit Ghai Guest

    I see. So, do I have to enable that to be able to change that folder name
    that I wanted to do? Is there any way to become THE Administrator to be able
    to make any changes?
     
    Sumit Ghai, Mar 23, 2007
    #11
  12. Sumit Ghai

    Jesper Guest

    I see. So, do I have to enable that to be able to change that folder name
    You can become THE Administrator by booting into safe mode and logging on
    with it, but there is no need to. Using the steps I gave you it is possible
    to fix the problem without resorting to such crude means. You just need to
    grant permissions to the right accounts.
     
    Jesper, Mar 23, 2007
    #12
  13. Sumit Ghai

    Antoine Leca Guest

    By the way, is there anything AN administrador cannot do while THE
    Administrador still can?

    I think one such thing is the ability to still log on locally (in safe mode)
    even if some policy or another similar way disable this (that is, there are
    cases you are allowed to shot yourself in the foot without actually hurting
    you.)

    But once you are logged on (as an administrador), I do not see effective
    differences (besides Deny ACE, that is.)


    Antoine
     
    Antoine Leca, Mar 23, 2007
    #13
  14. Sumit Ghai

    Jesper Guest

    Anyone who is a member of the Administrators group is an
    Very little. There were a few things in older operating systems. However,
    access checks for RID 500 (Administrator) should all have been replaced with
    group 544 (Builtin Administrators) in Vista.

    The main difference is that if you enable the Administrators account and log
    on with that UAC is not in effect. That account is not subject to UAC.
    There is actually a rather complicated decision process for whether the RID
    500 account can log on in safe mode if it is disabled or not, and it differs
    between domain joined and non-domain joined machines.
    UAC is not enabled for the built-in Administrator account, nor is it enabled
    for domain admins.
     
    Jesper, Mar 23, 2007
    #14
  15. Sumit Ghai

    Antoine Leca Guest

    In
    Thanks to Jesper for the detailled explanations (that I snipped, but the
    most valuable information is above, I think.)


    Antoine
     
    Antoine Leca, Mar 27, 2007
    #15
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