Does Vista prefer SATA BIOS setting IDE or AHCI ?? (KB922976)

Discussion in 'Windows Vista Performance' started by Blithe, Jul 23, 2009.

  1. Blithe

    Blithe Guest

    My system specs:

    OS Name Microsoft® Windows VistaT Ultimate
    Version 6.0.6002 Service Pack 2 Build 6002
    OS Manufacturer Microsoft Corporation
    System Model Maximus Extreme (ASUS)
    System Type x64-based PC
    Processor Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Extreme CPU Q6850 @ 3.00GHz, 2997 Mhz, 4
    Core(s)
    BIOS Version/Date American Megatrends Inc. 0904, 12/18/2007
    SMBIOS Version 2.4
    Boot Device \Device\HarddiskVolume1
    Hardware Abstraction Layer Version = "6.0.6002.18005"
    Installed Physical Memory (RAM) 4.00 GB
    Total Physical Memory 4.00 GB
    Available Physical Memory 2.76 GB
    Total Virtual Memory 8.20 GB
    Available Virtual Memory 6.93 GB
    Page File Space 4.29 GB

    Background:

    I have had ongoing random freezes for months that might have to do with my
    PC 700 watt power supply, my house wiring, a mix of causes - maybe all of
    the above. Please do not address such issues for this posting - the reason
    I mention it is that often these malfunctions cause my system to lose its
    default BIOS settings, including date/time, & the more I have to enter the
    BIOS to reset settings - the more questions I have about those BIOS
    settings.

    So - focusing upon my motherboard's SATA option setting - it had a default
    setting for IDE that I never changed - but AHCI is available. I checked
    Wikipedia for a general overview of AHCI that I do not claim to understand -
    but it has useful info for determining the correct Vista BIOS setting.
    Basically - it informs that (1) Vista is fully AHCI compatible (2) but it
    warns that changing to an AHCI setting will cause Vista crashes (BSODs)
    unless the specified users fail to follow the correct protocol - referring
    to MS KB922976:

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/922976

    Here are my questions for this newsgroup - disregarding what I have
    described above about my unstable/randomly dysfunctional Vista PC - &
    assuming that my system has consistently been A-OK & is still functioning
    satisfactorily:

    1. What is the correct/preferred SATA BIOS setting for my system
    specs/motherboard? (NOTE: I installed Vista Ultimate 64X retail on a new,
    custom built, barebones PC that did not have an installed OS - & I never
    changed the SATA mode of the boot drive - ALSO at Vista installation, the
    motherboard BIOS setting for plug&play was DISABLED - meaning that the BIOS
    controlled the settings for ALL devices - but if the setting were ENABLED,
    the BIOS online help explains that my system BIOS would still control the
    device settings required for booting the system - but all other devices
    would would be software controlled - I assume by the Vista OS)
    2. Given the KB922976 protocol - requiring registry changes for users who
    plan to change the SATA mode of their boot drive - or for users who have
    gotten the specific error message that the KB protocol is designed to
    correct - does my system really require/or even benefit from a change of
    setting from IDE to AHCI ??

    Comment - I'm sorry this post had to be so complicated but - isn't that the
    obvious downside of living in this brave, new, digital age?

    Blithe
     
    Blithe, Jul 23, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertisements


  2. Vista doesn't care what kind of hard drive is installed..
     
    Mike Hall - MVP, Jul 23, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Blithe

    Blithe Guest

    Vista doesn't care what kind of hard drive is installed..
    Thanks Mike - I'll take from your answer that in my case either an 'IDE' or
    'AHCI' setting will function equally well.

    Blithe
     
    Blithe, Jul 23, 2009
    #3
  4.  
    Mike Hall - MVP, Jul 23, 2009
    #4
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.