Drives Larger than 2TB

Discussion in 'Windows 64 Bit' started by Mike, Sep 26, 2006.

  1. Mike

    Mike Guest

    Does anyone know if the Windows XP Pro x64 Edition supports drives or volumes
    larger than 2TB?

    Thanks!!

    Mike
     
    Mike, Sep 26, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Mike

    Nut Cracker Guest

    logical volumes? Not sure about the file system limitations on x64, but with
    NTFS 5.1/5.2 (XP and 2003), its 16 Exabytes (16,000 Terabytes).
     
    Nut Cracker, Sep 26, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Mike

    Aaron Kelley Guest

    I believe MBR drives have a maximum partition size of 2TB.

    In Windows XP x64 (and Windows Server 2003 SP1+), you can convert a
    non-bootable disk to a GPT disk (in Disk Management, drive must be empty),
    which allows for larger partitions (although I am not sure of the maximum
    size off the top of my head).

    I have converted a drive to GPT and it works fine, however, I do not have
    any drives or arrays larger than 2 TB so I have not tested that part out
    myself. :p

    More reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GUID_Partition_Table

    - Aaron
     
    Aaron Kelley, Sep 27, 2006
    #3
  4. Hello,
    Let's try this link: The FAQ may answer this:
    http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/device/storage/GPT_FAQ.mspx

    6. How big can a GPT disk be?
    In theory, a GPT disk can be up to 2^64 logical blocks in length. Logical
    blocks are commonly 512 bytes in size.

    The maximum partition (and disk) size is a function of the operating system
    version. Windows XP and the original release of Windows Server 2003 have a
    limit of 2TB per physical disk, including all partitions. For Windows
    Server 2003 SP1 Windows XP x64 edition, and later versions, the maximum raw
    partition of 18 exabytes can be supported. (Windows file systems currently
    are limited to 256 terabytes each.)


    Thanks,
    Darrell Gorter[MSFT]

    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights
    --------------------
    <From: "Aaron Kelley" <>
    <References: <>
    <>
    <Subject: Re: Drives Larger than 2TB
    <Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 18:15:32 -0500
    <Lines: 34
    <X-Priority: 3
    <X-MSMail-Priority: Normal
    <X-Newsreader: Microsoft Outlook Express 6.00.3790.2663
    <X-RFC2646: Format=Flowed; Response
    <X-MimeOLE: Produced By Microsoft MimeOLE V6.00.3790.2757
    <Message-ID: <>
    <Newsgroups: microsoft.public.windows.64bit.general
    <NNTP-Posting-Host: 129.62.112.230
    <Path: TK2MSFTNGXA01.phx.gbl!TK2MSFTNGP01.phx.gbl!TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl
    <Xref: TK2MSFTNGXA01.phx.gbl microsoft.public.windows.64bit.general:40556
    <X-Tomcat-NG: microsoft.public.windows.64bit.general
    <
    <I believe MBR drives have a maximum partition size of 2TB.
    <
    <In Windows XP x64 (and Windows Server 2003 SP1+), you can convert a
    <non-bootable disk to a GPT disk (in Disk Management, drive must be empty),
    <which allows for larger partitions (although I am not sure of the maximum
    <size off the top of my head).
    <
    <I have converted a drive to GPT and it works fine, however, I do not have
    <any drives or arrays larger than 2 TB so I have not tested that part out
    <myself. :p
    <
    <More reading:
    <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GUID_Partition_Table
    <
    < - Aaron
    <
    <<>
    <> <>> Does anyone know if the Windows XP Pro x64 Edition supports drives or
    <>> volumes
    <>> larger than 2TB?
    <>>
    <>> Thanks!!
    <>>
    <>> Mike
    <>
    <> logical volumes? Not sure about the file system limitations on x64, but
    <> with NTFS 5.1/5.2 (XP and 2003), its 16 Exabytes (16,000 Terabytes).
    <>
    <
    <
    <
     
    Darrell Gorter[MSFT], Sep 27, 2006
    #4
  5. Mike

    jacob navia Guest

    2TB...

    Gosh!
    Each time I read this kind of news I feel so much older...
     
    jacob navia, Sep 27, 2006
    #5
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.