HEY CAT, THANKS!! ONE MORE THING

Discussion in 'Server Migration' started by Bill, Jul 23, 2004.

  1. Bill

    Bill Guest

    Thanks Cat!!! You put my heart at ease a bit. Just to
    clarify, if all of the clients are 2000 or XP Pro, we can
    shut down the WINS service completly, correct? As long as
    all ofour workstations have the correct DNS server in the
    IP setup (which we will begin to run thru DHCP). We will
    also have 3-4 NT 4.0 servers on the network until we
    complete the upgrade. WINS is not necessary for the old
    servers, correct? They can all be referred back to the new
    2K3 box for DNS usage, correct? Even the BDC. Thanks
    again!!
     
    Bill, Jul 23, 2004
    #1
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  2. Hi Bill,

    Thanks for your posting here.

    Windows 2000 clients and above will take advantage of DNS to find the
    closest DC. NT4 clients will still use their old method of enumeration
    which is using WINS to find 1C/1B records. If you have NT BDCs in the
    domain, you need to keep a WINS server to make others find them since NT
    BDC cannot register SRV records in DNS server.

    You can just use DNS in Windows 2000 Domain if all the clients are Windows
    2000 or later system. Personally I think it will be better that you keep
    the WINS server in your network so that the network browsing will be more
    efficient than DNS for naming resolution in LAN.

    In addition, some applications (for example Outlook, Exchange) still prefer
    to using WINS to contact the server first. It may cause a little slow if
    you remove WINS form your environment.

    Have a nice day!

    Regards,
    Bob Qin
    Product Support Services
    Microsoft Corporation

    Get Secure! - www.microsoft.com/security

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    Bob Qin [MSFT], Jul 26, 2004
    #2
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