Hotmail/Outlook?

Discussion in 'Windows Live Mail' started by Ted, Apr 28, 2013.

  1. Ted

    Ted Guest

    Is hotmail/outlook some sort of elaborate hoax? Are we supposed to not mind
    waiting until outlook is in a good mood before we can access our mail?

    The once reliable hotmail has been ruined.
     
    Ted, Apr 28, 2013
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Ted

    VanguardLH Guest

    Outlook? You're in the wrong newsgroup. Outlook is discussed in:

    microsoft.public.outlook[.general]

    This newsgroup discusses Windows Live Mail (WLM).

    As for using the Outlook Hotmail Connector with Outlook 2003/2007
    (don't have 2010 to test), I've found that add-on destabilizes that
    e-mail client. Outlook would crash too often with that add-on
    installed and in use (and this was evidenced on multiple hosts running
    different versions of Windows). I gave up on using the add-on and
    reverted to using POP3 and SMTP to access my Hotmail and Outlook.com
    accounts. However, as noted below, I've since abandoned my
    Hotmail/Live/Outlook.com accounts for a more stable and reliable
    service (with my current ISP). I keep those accounts alive by having
    Gmail poll them. Free accounts require periodic logging into them to
    keep them from idle expiring, so I have Gmail poll them (which does a
    login). I then poll the Gmail account in my local e-mail client to
    keep the Gmail account alive (I don't care for Gmail's goofy
    interpretations of POP, IMAP, and SMTP and defining server-side
    filters sucks worse than those available in Hotmail). That keeps
    reserved those Microsoft e-mail accounts (which have been set to use
    Exclusive mode for now), adds Gmail's spam filtering, and only Google
    will have to suffer with the bogus login errors that infect the
    behavior of Microsoft's servers being overloaded and puking and ERR
    during login attempts.
    I find using a local e-mail client accessing Hotmail/Live/Outlook.com
    using POP3 to be reliable ... enough. Microsoft's server do get
    overly busy or they haven't bothered to scale up to the load which
    results in clients getting ERR status. Since POP3 has no standardized
    error messages and only has OK and ERR status, a client that gets an
    ERR during the handshaking doesn't know what went wrong so it pukes
    out the bogus error about invalid login credentials (since it was
    during the login process to establish a mail session when the error
    occurred). The POP3 server shouldn't be accepting connects if it
    cannot handle the current load. Aborting during the handshaking is
    too late to disconnect because of too high a load on the server but
    that's what Microsoft does and too often. I typically get at least
    one bogus invalid login error per day. I poll at 10 minute intervals
    so it's not like I'm abusing the server with frivilous overly frequent
    mail polls and I do not receive such huge e-mails that their transfer
    would exceed the polling interval so the next mail poll gets started
    before the prior one completes the DATA transfer for message(s).
    Using Microsoft's e-mail service means suffering the all too often
    bogus login error dialogs.

    Using SMTP to send through Microsoft's service is even more
    unreliable. Sometimes the Send completes immediately. Sometimes the
    client sits there for 5 minutes, or longer, waiting to send.
    Microsoft doesn't return an ERR status but still disconnects during
    the mail session (stops the mail session, not disconnect from the
    client), so the client may continue waiting for a server that is no
    longer has a mail session. You could end up with an outbound e-mail
    sitting in the Outbox for a long time, so long that you may have to
    use their webmail client to send a reply and delete the one in your
    Outbox.

    Using HTTP/Deltasync doesn't improve on Microsoft's deficient load
    handling on their servers. If you're monitoring the operation of your
    client, you'll sometime hang around for a long time waiting for an
    operation to complete. Accessing your e-mail can sometimes be a real
    pain using any protocol whether standard (POP3/SMTP) or Microsoft's
    proprietary solution (HTTP/WebDAV and now HTTP/Deltasync). Either you
    have to get used to the long but usually temporary outages or
    unresponsiveness or decide to go somewhere else more reliable. For
    personal use, you might choose to suffer. For business use, you'll
    get pushed to something better. Paying for a Plus account isn't going
    to improve their server frontend and mail farm setup. All that does
    is get rid of ads in their webmail client (which can be blocked with
    something like Firefox+AdblockPlus).

    I was hoping with Microsoft's push to their Outlook.com domain and the
    "Outlook" UI for their re-skinned webmail client that they might
    improve on server availability and reliability. Didn't happen. After
    2 months of returning to Microsoft's e-mail service, I had to go back
    to my ISP's e-mail service to eliminate the bogus login errors and the
    overly long delay on send.

    Sorry, but my experience with Hotmail/Live/Outlook.com over the last
    11 years has never seen it as a highly reliable and stable service so
    I don't see it as declining in the recent past as you claim. It has
    been bad for as long as I can remember. Seems to have periods of when
    it works well and then has bouts of when it doesn't. While I am okay
    with getting a couple spams a week, I'm not so forgiving about an
    e-mail service that is unreliable or too often too slow to respond.
    Gmail has been more reliable, quicker, and more responsive; however, I
    don't care for many behaviors of that service so I look elsewhere.
     
    VanguardLH, Apr 28, 2013
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Ted

    Good Guy Guest

    Yes I agree with you that Microsoft has messed up outlook.com. It is
    unbearable slow and the only way to speed up is to use WLM or Outlook
    (mail client).
     
    Good Guy, Apr 29, 2013
    #3
  4. Ted

    ...winston Guest

    "VanguardLH" wrote in message However, as noted below, I've since abandoned my
    Hotmail/Live/Outlook.com accounts for a more stable and reliable
    service (with my current ISP). I keep those accounts alive by having
    Gmail poll them. Free accounts require periodic logging into them to
    keep them from idle expiring, so I have Gmail poll them (which does a
    login). I then poll the Gmail account in my local e-mail client to
    keep the Gmail account alive (I don't care for Gmail's goofy
    interpretations of POP, IMAP, and SMTP and defining server-side
    filters sucks worse than those available in Hotmail). That keeps
    reserved those Microsoft e-mail accounts (which have been set to use
    Fyi...polling a free Hotmail type account (Hotmail, Live, Msn, Outlook.com) in Gmail or using POP3 in an email client no longer
    counts as means to prevent expiration or resets the 270 day inactivity timer

    There are multiple ways to prevent account expiration and reset the activity timer
    1. Access the account in Windows Live Mail using http protocol (DeltaSync)
    2. Access the account on any device via EAS
    3. Access the account in the Outlook Connector (Outlook 2003/2007/2010) using http (DeltaSync/Mapi)
    4. Access the account in Outlook 2013 using the built in Outlook Connector (EAS)

    Fyi...Hotmail servers have restrictions regarding use of repeated POP3 access attempts thus check 'every x' minutes is best set at
    15 min or greater. Error messages for all domains (Hotmail, Live, Msn, Outlook.com) with pop attempts set to poll every 4 to 14
    minutes are shown below.

    **
    Task 'MSN - Receiving' reported error (0x800CCC90) : 'Your incoming (POP3) e-mail server has reported an internal error. If you
    continue to receive this message, contact your server administrator or Internet service provider (ISP). The server responded: -ERR
    Exceeded the login limit for a 5 minute period. Reduce the frequency of requests to the POP3 server.'

    Task 'Hotmail - Receiving' reported error (0x800CCC90) : 'Your incoming (POP3) e-mail server has reported an internal error. If you
    continue to receive this message, contact your server administrator or Internet service provider (ISP). The server responded: -ERR
    Exceeded the login limit for a 5 minute period. Reduce the frequency of requests to the POP3 server.'

    Task 'Hotmail Plus - Receiving' reported error (0x800CCC90) : 'Your incoming (POP3) e-mail server has reported an internal error.
    If you continue to receive this message, contact your server administrator or Internet service provider (ISP). The server
    responded: -ERR Exceeded the login limit for a 5 minute period. Reduce the frequency of requests to the POP3 server.'

    Task 'Live - Receiving' reported error (0x800CCC90) : 'Your incoming (POP3) e-mail server has reported an internal error. If you
    continue to receive this message, contact your server administrator or Internet service provider (ISP). The server responded: -ERR
    Exceeded the login limit for a 15 minute period. Reduce the frequency of requests to the POP3 server.'

    Task 'OLCom - Receiving' reported error (0x800CCC90) : 'Your incoming (POP3) e-mail server has reported an internal error. If you
    continue to receive this message, contact your server administrator or Internet service provider (ISP). The server responded: -ERR
    Exceeded the login limit for a 15 minute period. Reduce the frequency of requests to the POP3 server.'
     
    ...winston, Apr 30, 2013
    #4
  5. Ted

    VanguardLH Guest

    Go to the login page, or login and use the Gear icon -> More Help
    menu. Then do a search on something so basic as "close account". Do
    you see any relevant articles show up? Nope. Microsoft's online help
    is worthless because they deluge hundreds of non-relevant articles in
    a search. Absolutely useless. Oh yes, asking for help on "close
    account" after logging into Outlook.com and using the Gear icon ->
    More Help menu should really be telling me about how t close or
    finalize a CD or what happens when I close the lid on a mobile PC.

    I cannot verify your claim matches up with what Microsoft says are
    their policies. I have yet to discover the secret search phrase to
    find the idle expiration policies. Maybe you know them directly but
    that won't help trying to find them through Microsoft's own online
    help.

    Searching their help is of no help. You can pick the Top Solutions
    (which lists maybe 10 of them) or pick a category and see maybe
    another 8 "solutions". It's like 90% of their help articles vanished
    like a fart in the wind when they changed their online help system.
    It wasn't that great before. It got worse.

    Nope, I'm not wasting more than 10 minutes trying to navigate pages
    will few article links for a deficient search that can't figure out it
    should show articles matching on the inquiry entered when starting the
    help process from one of their services.
    I'm finding database corruption is too frequent and will leaving that
    client to go back to Outlook.
    Not available back in pre-2013 Outlook.
    Yep, could do that if I didn't care about it destabilizing Outlook
    along with not resolving the bogus login errors because they cannot
    handle the load. I'm keeping those old Hotmail & Outlook.com accounts
    alive (in reserve) so I really don't even want to waste the overhead
    to poll them from my host.
    Yep, buy something to fix something else but which works fine at other
    e-mail providers.
    While I cannot find it now, and it might be an old help article that
    didn't survive the rework of their support pages, I recall they said
    the *minimum* poll interval should be 5 minutes. That was their
    recommendation to prevent viewing shorter poll intervals as abusive
    (and not about making sure your e-mail client would actually finish a
    mail poll before starting the next one). I currently have the mail
    poll interval set to 10 minutes. Works just fine with other e-mail
    providers.

    The super long delays on send are not due to polling at too-short
    intervals. I could have Outlook configured for manual polling and
    Outlook unloaded. I load Outlook, I send an e-mail, and there's a
    good chance it will sit in the Outbox for the excessive long duration
    of the mail session with the server. There are no errors with the
    server (it did not return an ERR status) but the message still didn't
    get sent. Then maybe 20 minutes I do a resend and it goes right away.
    These long hangs during the mail session don't happen on every send
    but they happen several times per day. Obviously if there's nothing
    in the Outbox then this excessive session hang isn't exhibited. Only
    when I send something do I then cross my fingers to hope it goes that
    time; else, I have to wait and try again later, and maybe wait some
    more and try again later. With other e-mail providers, once they
    establish the mail session, boom, the send completes immediately and
    does it every time.
    Which shows the minimal recommended interval is 5 minutes, not 15.
    For e-mail, I figure 10 minutes is more than short enough as it takes
    that long to read any new e-mails before you can do anything about
    them. However, Outlook is normally (by default) configured to send
    immediately so it is quite possible your client just did a mail poll
    and only a few seconds elapse when you happen to click Send. Still,
    with other e-mail providers, I don't run into this error. They have
    an anti-abuse quota of how many mail sessions per minute are allowed,
    not how far apart they must be. Although e-mail is not a typical
    venue for chatting, there are many times someone sends you and e-mail,
    you're right there to read it and you pelt off an immediate response.
    The rely immediately, you do, too, and so on. You might have a spike
    of half a dozen e-mails that get sent immediately inside a couple
    minutes but that traffic load doesn't come anywhere near the 100, or
    more, maximum mail sessions per minute for quotas at other e-mail
    providers.

    This error evidences another failing of Microsoft's e-mail services:
    overly short timeouts for the interval between mail sessions. E-mail
    was specifically designed to behave both as a bulletin board type of
    message system (put out a message and wait for a reply which could be
    quite awhile later) and or near interactive discussions. It's not
    quite designed to be as instantaneous as a chat client but it wasn't
    designed to be as slow as molasses in February, either.

    The excuse might be that, hey, this is a free e-mail service so a
    5-minute for EVERY send should be acceptable. Well, what other free
    e-mail service enforces this same short poll quota? I've use Yahoo
    Mail, Gmail, and Inbox.com (and probably several others that I don't
    remember anymore) and don't recall a problem with multiple sends
    ranging in number to under a dozen within a few minutes. Half a dozen
    sends with Hotmail and having to wait 5 minutes between each means a
    conversation that would've taken 5 minutes would instead take 30 all
    because of a severely crippling anti-abuse quote regarding how long
    between sends versus how many max sends per minute.

    Note that in almost every case where I saw the item hanging in the
    Outbox with an overly long mail session this error never occurred.
    The server didn't abort the session because it was too soon after the
    prior one. I'd be sending the mails several hours or days apart. I
    have very a low volume of e-mail traffic and typically when there is
    any volume it spikes with maybe 3-4 replies in a couple minutes if
    both parties are present at the time. There were no errors (i.e., the
    server never issued an ERR status).

    There isn't an error during the mail session from the server. It
    isn't issuing an ERR status from a command it received from the
    client. The problem is the mail session is sometimes taking a
    ridiculously long time to complete. Sometimes it can take so long the
    client thinks the server is dead and the client will abort the session
    but that's because the server isn't doing anything.

    If the error had said the server rejected establishing a session
    because the mail poll interval was too short, twould be simple enough
    to up it in the client; however, that won't help for the vast majority
    of e-mail clients that are configured to send immediately. Users
    would have to reconfigure their e-mail clients to not send immediately
    and instead wait until the next scheduled mail poll to do the send.

    If you just sent an e-mail to someone about a change in location for
    where you were going to meet but it would pend their reply, and you
    then get their reply, are you really going to wait 5 or 15 minutes to
    send your reply? If they had some questions, are you going to wait
    another 15 minutes before replying? Do you EVER wait to reply when
    you just got an e-mail to which you would compose a simple short reply
    to send back? Maybe you do. I don't. Never have. Never needed to
    with any other e-mail provider. If I'm selling something on eBay or
    Craigslist and someone sends me a question about the item, I don't
    compose a reply and let it dangle in the Outbox waiting until the
    client gets around to the next scheduled mail poll. I send the reply
    right now. Then the customer might want more info right away. I'm
    not going to wait to reply to them again because of an inane
    anti-abuse quota regarding how far apart my sends have to be from the
    last mail poll (which I would have to know when that happened which is
    highly unlikely).

    What you showed as possible error messages back from Microsoft's
    e-mail services is further evidence that it cannot be used for
    business use and will be a disruptive pain even for personal use.
    Microsoft punishes users of local e-mail clients since these excessive
    send sessions or anti-abuse quotas (time between mail polls versus max
    mail polls per minute) are not incurred by users of their webmail
    client.

    Oh, and is there still the message volume anti-abuse quota with
    Microsoft's free e-mail services where users of local e-mail clients
    can send a maximum of only 100 messages per day (but, again, webmail
    users are not similarly punished and they get a higher anti-abuse
    quota of 500 mails/day)? Yeah, I wasn't going to waste time searching
    for that, either, in their revised help system. I don't come anywhere
    close to 100 e-mails per day but I'm sure other users send way more
    e-mails than I do. I could see getting screwed by that quota if I
    happened to setup a company reunion party. I'd get a bunch of replies
    but, gee, I couldn't reply to anyone for 5 minutes minimum from
    whenever my client last performed an mail poll which I won't know when
    that happened. Would take 6 hours to address the deluge of replies as
    they trickled in one at a time. Oops, could take days since the back
    and forth conversations would slam me up against the 100 mails/day
    anti-abuse quota.

    I understand you were bring helpful in bringing to light Microsoft's
    minimum mail poll intervals. It does bring to light other problems
    when using Microsoft's e-mail services. However, that had nothing to
    do with the excessively long mail sessions after they were already
    established and where the server never issued an ERR status because
    what really happened is the server went unresponsive after already
    establishing the mail session. It didn't puke at me that I was
    sending too fast (for e-mails sent hours apart). It just went off
    into la-la-land. Many times I couldn't wait for the server to become
    responsive again for SMTP connects so I'd have to go use their webmail
    client. I'd copy my reply from the item in the Outbox, delete the
    item from the Outbox, and then use the webmail client to compose a
    reply. No problems then. Server was responsive okay via web
    interface but went unresponsive for SMTP sessions. The server is
    there but not all the doors are open.
     
    VanguardLH, Apr 30, 2013
    #5
  6. Ted

    ...winston Guest

    "VanguardLH" wrote in message Go to the login page, or login and use the Gear icon -> More Help
    menu. Then do a search on something so basic as "close account". Do
    you see any relevant articles show up? Nope. Microsoft's online help
    is worthless because they deluge hundreds of non-relevant articles in
    a search. Absolutely useless. Oh yes, asking for help on "close
    account" after logging into Outlook.com and using the Gear icon ->
    More Help menu should really be telling me about how t close or
    finalize a CD or what happens when I close the lid on a mobile PC.

    I cannot verify your claim matches up with what Microsoft says are
    their policies.
    Lol...
    I'm not suggesting you search online help or anything...only providing what I'm certain is valid information and post-dates any
    information you've commented or referenced regarding account expiration and POP3 polling restrictions.

    If you read all provided error messages you might even notice that different 'Incoming' time-out errors result for older vs. newer
    accounts - MSN/Hotmail vs. Live/Outlook.com.

    Good luck if your waiting for MSFT to provide the same info online.
     
    ...winston, Apr 30, 2013
    #6
  7. Ted

    VanguardLH Guest

    I happen to be looking at options for one of my Hotmail accounts,
    specifically the forwarding option. There is says that I still need
    to login within 270 days to keep my account active. It doesn't define
    "signin" so there's no indication that a POP3 login wouldn't suffice.
    Which I showed by using a regex to show the various account types and
    did the same with the same matching number of parameters in the regex
    showing the timeout value in the error message. You showed 5 error
    messages that were all the same except for account type and minimum
    poll interval. I just merged them all and showed the variant account
    types and min poll intervals as a regex choice.

    I wasn't getting those error messages. Their server wasn't rejecting
    the connects because the mail polls were too close. The client got
    stuck waiting for the server to become responsive (so the client might
    time out, not the server rejecting the session attempt).

    Don't focus on their servers rejecting mail sessions because they were
    too close to one another. That's not what is happening. Their server
    accepts the connect, establishes the session, and then it goes dead.
    Meanwhile the client waits for the server to respond. Could be many
    minutes later before the server comes back alive but the user is stuck
    with a very long time waiting for a send operation that should've
    completed in seconds and not around 5 minutes, or more. Sometimes the
    server goes unresponsive and stays that way for so long that the
    client aborts the mail session. That's not the server issuing some
    rejection error saying the mail sessions are too close. That's the
    mail server not responding at all! The tire started rolling down the
    hill and suddenly freezes for no reason at the middle of the hill.
    But they DID used to provide that info. When it used to be looking
    for help while using their Hotmail service showed just Hotmail topics
    or later when you could pick Hotmail from the list of categories in a
    left pane, you COULD find the info on when accounts get deactivated
    after what period of idleness and then when the account would get
    deleted if there still wasn't any activity. Now that info isn't
    anywhere to be found or I haven't found the secret navigation path
    through their vague, unfocused, and often vacuous help system.

    We all know that Google went downhill with searches, especially after
    they removed the used of the "+" prefix to mandate a term had to be
    included in a search hit and "-" mandated the term could not appear
    and not that it may optionally not appear. Well, Microsoft outdid
    Google in that regard in making searches generate long lists of
    unrelated results.

    Microsoft's help wasn't that great before. It got a lot worse.
     
    VanguardLH, May 1, 2013
    #7
  8. Ted

    Magnus Guest

    FWIW "-" is still functional... See "Exclude a word"
    http://support.google.com/websearch/answer/136861
     
    Magnus, May 1, 2013
    #8
  9. Ted

    VanguardLH Guest

    Doesn't work, or works so infrequently that there's no point in using
    it. I have tried many Google search where I specified to exclude a
    word and it did not work. The search results still had the excluded
    word in the articles in their hit list.
     
    VanguardLH, May 1, 2013
    #9
  10. Ted

    ...winston Guest

    "VanguardLH" wrote in message news:klpnq8$4cn$...
    It (POP3 access) used to suffice at an earlier point in time. Once other branded services (syncable contacts and calendar,
    SkyDrive, etc.) became part of Hotmail type accounts physical logon via a web broswer or http capable local client signon/sync to
    branded services is necessary. Outlook.com email accounts mailbox (fka Hotmail and all applicable domains - Hotmail, Live, Msn,
    Outlook.com) and cloud based features (SkyDrive, People, Calendar, are branded services.

    Microsoft doesn't it spell it out in 'Help'. They do reference logon (not mail POP3 access) in the Microsoft Account user agreement
    <qp>
    The Microsoft branded services require that you sign into your Microsoft account periodically, at a minimum every 270 days, to keep
    the Microsoft branded services portion of the services active, unless provided otherwise in an offer for a paid portion of the
    services. If you fail to sign in during this period, we may cancel your access to the Microsoft branded services. If the Microsoft
    branded services are canceled due to your failure to sign in, your data may be permanently deleted from our servers
    </qp>
    Note: Paid/subscription based accounts do not expire.

    One can also find a variety related 'web logon required' statements in MSFT Answers forum
    e.g.
    <qp>
    'To answer your concern, yes, you're required to login via web once every 270 days to keep your Microsoft account active.'

    'Please be informed that an account will be inactive if you do not sign in via web browser for 270 days or within the first 10 days
    after registration.'
    </qp>

    Windows 8 (when using a MSFT account for windows logon) changes the picture
    - i.e. one is always signed on and has access and connectivity to a variety of branded services.


    -- --
    ....winston
    msft mvp consumer apps
     
    ...winston, May 1, 2013
    #10
  11. Ted

    VanguardLH Guest

    "sign into your Microsoft account" doesn't specify that only web logon
    or Deltasync must be used for logon. It just says "sign into". How
    to sign-in is not specified so POP3 logon is not specifically
    excluded.
    When I search Microsoft's help, I exclude the community folklore.
    What's claimed in those forums or even here doesn't mandate it is
    true. Those posts are not policies published by Microsoft. The
    source (Microsoft) has been mute by omission or clarification.

    I have not seen rampant complaints from POP3-only users noting that
    suddenly the could not access their account via POP3 because it went
    inactive. There are plenty of OE users (WebDAV unusable, no Deltasync
    support) accessing Hotmail accounts. There are plenty of pre-2013
    users of Outlook that do NOT use the Outlook Hotmail Connector add-on
    for Deltasync support and still they continue to acess their Hotmail
    accounts via standard e-mail protocols (POP3/SMTP). There are plenty
    of users of non-Microsoft clients (e.g., Thunderbird, EssentialPIM,
    Eudora, Pegasus, etc) that cannot use Deltasync yet they successfully
    continue to access their Hotmail accounts using only POP3 & SMTP. If
    Microsoft changed to requiring web logons, there would've be a wailing
    from user users who do not or cannot use Deltasync and finding their
    Hotmail accounts had suddenly become inactive and thereby
    inaccessible.

    If web or Deltasync logon is now required, it is a recent policy
    change. I have been using only POP3 access to keep alive my Hotmail
    accounts for many many years. If there has a policy change by
    Microsoft, it was established sometime [much] less than 270 days ago
    since POP3 logins continue to keep my old Hotmail accounts alive. My
    observation conflicts with your unsourced and untested claim.

    If you are correct then in 270 days, or less, my old Hotmail accounts
    that are currently being accessed solely using POP3 will go inactive.
    I don't see users now saying POP3-only access stopped working because
    they found their account went inactive. If you are correct, and since
    I'm not interested in anything other than e-mail service (i.e., I
    don't give a gnat's fart about calendar and contact sync) then I'll
    just let those Hotmail acconts die. I don't need nor want to use or
    get forced onto Microsoft's properietary protocols. That a client
    might sync calendar and contacts or some other non-email information
    does not mandate abandoning the standard e-mail protocols for the
    *e-mail* function of the client. Going proprietary wasn't required
    for just the e-mail function. It was Microsoft's desire to lock
    users into protocols under the control of Microsoft hence locking them
    into Microsoft products.

    For now, the current observation is that POP3 does keep active the
    Hotmail/Live/Outlook.com accounts. Contradiction is not substantiated
    from the source (Microsoft). So far, a "sign in" works whether it be
    via web UI, Deltasync, or POP3/SMTP.

    At this point, we can agree to disagree. Your claim is based on
    community folklore and not substantiated by published [and clear]
    policy from Microsoft. In another 9 months, or less, we'll see which
    of us were correct. As of today, and without evidence from Microsoft,
    and from past and current observation, polling Hotmail accounts via
    POP3 keeps them from going inactive.
     
    VanguardLH, May 1, 2013
    #11
  12. Ted

    ...winston Guest

    "VanguardLH" wrote in message For now, the current observation is that POP3 does keep active the
    Hotmail/Live/Outlook.com accounts. Contradiction is not substantiated
    from the source (Microsoft). So far, a "sign in" works whether it be
    via web UI, Deltasync, or POP3/SMTP.

    At this point, we can agree to disagree.
    Believe what you wish.
    POP3 access no longer qualifies as a preventive measure for the 270 day account expiration constraint for free Hotmail type
    (hotmail, msn, live, outlook.com) accounts.
     
    ...winston, May 2, 2013
    #12
  13. Ted

    VanguardLH Guest

    Believe what you wish, too.

    See, that commandment doesn't change anything nor does it mandate a
    claim as true. Makes you look silly. I'm asking for substantiation
    and you retort with this. Okie dokie, then. Bye bye.
     
    VanguardLH, May 2, 2013
    #13
  14. Ted

    Magnus Guest

    That denies reality. I have active hotmail, live and outlook free
    accounts that are only (that I know of) POP3 accessed. The hotmail
    account is well beyond 5+ years (maybe 10, IDR) active. Maybe I'm just
    an outlier... or maybe not.
     
    Magnus, May 2, 2013
    #14
  15. Ted

    ...winston Guest

    "Magnus" wrote in message news:kltqp9$n6$...That denies reality. I have active hotmail, live and outlook free
    accounts that are only (that I know of) POP3 accessed. The hotmail
    account is well beyond 5+ years (maybe 10, IDR) active. Maybe I'm just
    an outlier... or maybe [email protected] and VanguardLH

    No, it only states the nature of the current state.

    Ensure you logon using the mechanisms recommended earlier in this thread.
    - browser, Http/DeltaSync protocol in WLM or Outlook, any device using EAS, Windows 8 Mail app

    Hint...it would be a good idea to do so prior to Nov 2013.
     
    ...winston, May 2, 2013
    #15
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.