How can I tell which USB slots are 2.0 & which are 1.0

Discussion in 'Windows Vista General Discussion' started by OscarVogel, Apr 25, 2007.

  1. OscarVogel

    OscarVogel Guest

    My PC has at least 1 USB 2.0 port. The others are USB 1.x.

    How can I tell which is which?

    This is what's listed in Device Manager, under "Universal Serial Bus
    controllers":

    Intel(R) 82801DB/DBM USB 2.0 Enhanced Host Contyroller - 24CD
    Intel(R) 82801DB/DBM USB
    Intel(R) 82801DB/DBM USB
    Intel(R) 82801DB/DBM USB
     
    OscarVogel, Apr 25, 2007
    #1
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  2. OscarVogel

    OscarVogel Guest

    Sorry, I sent this before it I was finished. Here is the complete message
    that I ment to send;

    My PC has at least 1 USB 2.0 port. The others are USB 1.x.

    How can I tell which is which?

    This is what's listed in Device Manager, under "Universal Serial Bus
    controllers":

    Intel(R) 82801DB/DBM USB 2.0 Enhanced Host Contyroller - 24CD
    Intel(R) 82801DB/DBM USB Universal Host Controller - 24C2
    Intel(R) 82801DB/DBM USB Universal Host Controller - 24C4
    Intel(R) 82801DB/DBM USB Universal Host Controller - 24C7
    USB Root Hub
    USB Root Hub
    USB Root Hub
    USB Root Hub

    When I plug my USB flash drive into one of the ports it appears as "USB Mass
    Storage Device" immediatly following the 4th "Intel(R) 82801DB/DBM ..."
    device and immediatly preceeding the 1st "USB Root Hub".

    So how can I tell if it's plugged into the USB 2.0 port, or what port it IS
    plugged into?

    Thanks.
     
    OscarVogel, Apr 25, 2007
    #2
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  3. OscarVogel

    Bill Yanaire Guest

    Try plugging in a USB 1.0 device into each USB port. When the USB 2.0 port
    detects the 1.0 device, you will get a message saying that a 1.0 device is
    plugged into a 2.0 port and you won't the the full benefit of 2.0
     
    Bill Yanaire, Apr 25, 2007
    #3
  4. OscarVogel

    John Barnes Guest

    With your USB drive connected, you can check the Properties for each
    controller in Device Manager until you find the one it is shown in.
     
    John Barnes, Apr 25, 2007
    #4
  5. OscarVogel

    PTravel Guest

    Go into Device Manager, open the USB section, right click on the USB
    controller and open Properties. Select the Driver tab, then click on Driver
    Details. If you see "usbuhci.sys" it's a 2.0 port. If you see anything
    else, e.g. "usbehci.sys" then it's not a 2.0 port.
     
    PTravel, Apr 25, 2007
    #5
  6. OscarVogel

    R. McCarty Guest

    There might be an easier way. You can switch the Device Manager
    View so it shows "View by Connection". You can expand the ACPI
    tree to navigate down to the PCI bus, then the "Enhanced" controller
    or controllers expanding that will show it's root hub and any USB 2
    devices connected.

    Microsoft also has a USB Device Viewer that shows the fan-out of
    the controllers, hubs and connected devices.
    You can get a copy here:
    http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/device/stream/vidcap/UVCViewdwn.mspx?
     
    R. McCarty, Apr 25, 2007
    #6
  7. OscarVogel

    OscarVogel Guest

    Thanks. All the suggestions were good. But that UVCView utility from MS
    really works like a charm.

    Thanks again.
     
    OscarVogel, Apr 26, 2007
    #7
  8. OscarVogel

    DanR Guest

    Well I am really confused. I've noticed this usb and enhanced usb
    nomenclature before in device manager. But I've assumed that all modern
    computers have ALL usb2 ports. I just downloaded and ran the USB device
    viewer. According to it I have 20 usb ports. I do not. And by pure chance my
    keyboard, mouse and UPS are connected to a USB Universal Host Controller and
    my external hard drive is connected to a USB2 Enhanced Host Controller. And
    it tells me I have 8 USB2 ports. It's late and dark in this room so I can't
    crawl around to the back and count the USB ports there and on the front but
    8 sounds about right for the total physical USB ports on my machine.
     
    DanR, Apr 26, 2007
    #8
  9. OscarVogel

    Uwe Sieber Guest

    Uwe Sieber, Apr 26, 2007
    #9
  10. OscarVogel

    DanR Guest

    Thanks Uwe for the link. I still don't see this clearly though. If my MB has
    8 physical USB ports how many USB2 devices can I connect and run at USB2
    speeds. And I think I mean enhanced speeds. If I connected an external hard
    drive to each of the 8 ports would some run at higher speeds than others.
    Does Windows somehow look at the device and make a judgment call on whether
    the device should run at USB2 enhanced speeds?
    Do I read you correctly that it doesn't matter exactly "which" port a device
    is connected to?
     
    DanR, Apr 26, 2007
    #10
  11. No you can't try that option except bios mobo doesn't support usb 2.0, 1
    will be used instead
    in device manager yu can see if usb port are in enhanced mode that means
    that(2.0) will be used
    ussually new mobos uses usb 2.0


    Saludos

    Antonio
     
    Antonio Amengual, Apr 26, 2007
    #11
  12. OscarVogel

    Uwe Sieber Guest

    Today's mainboards have USB2 ports only. Some years ago there
    was a short period when USB2 was made by an additional chip but
    that's past. XP will show an balloon tip "This device can perform
    faster" if you attache an USB2 highspeed device to an pure USB1
    port.
    So it doesn't matter which port you are using, they all
    can work either in USB1 or USB2 mode, it just depends on
    the capabilities of the attached device.


    Uwe
     
    Uwe Sieber, Apr 26, 2007
    #12
  13. OscarVogel

    R. McCarty Guest

    I haven't seen a recent motherboard with only USB (Enhanced) ports.
    Yesterday I installed/setup a new rig with an Intel 945 motherboard &
    it definitely came with both Standard/Universal ports along with USB2.
    Of course I'm loosing touch with AMD based systems since everything
    I deploy is Intel based - maybe the USB 2.0 only is for AMD systems ?
     
    R. McCarty, Apr 26, 2007
    #13
  14. OscarVogel

    Uwe Sieber Guest

    As I wrote, the Standard ports are nothing else than
    logical incarnations of the USB2 ports which are used
    for USB1 devices only.

    http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/device/stream/vidcap/UVCView.mspx
    With this tool you will see that the number of USB2 and USB1 ports
    is equal because they are identical physical ports.

    Just try this: Attach an USB2 flash drive. Open an
    Explorer window. Then deactivate the Enhanced controller
    in the device manager. You will see the drive disappearing
    in the Explorer and then come again, this time with a
    "this device can perform faster" message under XP. It
    just uses the USB1 incarnation of the same physical port
    now.
    Ensure that there are no open handles to this or any other
    USB drive and that no other USB drives are in use. Windows
    will ask for a restart then.

    In UVCview you can see the USB drive appearing then on
    a standard port even you did not touch it.
    But deactivate the 'Auto refresh' while the experiment,
    it leads to a massive slow down when Windows handles USB
    events.


    Uwe
     
    Uwe Sieber, Apr 26, 2007
    #14
  15. OscarVogel

    DanR Guest

    OK, this is making sense. The device itself is plug and play and devices
    like keyboards and mice are USB1 and thus tell Windows to operate in the
    USB1 mode. An external hard drive being USB2 likewise tells Windows to use
    the USB2 protocol. Or something like that.
    I figured that all USB ports on new computers had to be USB2 capable or else
    marked otherwise. I've never seen USB ports labeled differently on any of my
    computers to indicate which ports are USB1 and USB2. And if it were true
    that some were USB1 and some were USB2 they would surly have to be marked as
    such.
     
    DanR, Apr 27, 2007
    #15
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