IE9 question

Discussion in 'Internet Explorer' started by Tony Vella, Jul 15, 2011.

  1. Tony Vella

    Tony Vella Guest

    I am using IE9 on a Vista machine.

    There is something going on that was first a bother and is now a worry. I
    went to a business-card printing site to check their pricing and within a
    couple of hours every website I open has business card printing
    advertisments on it. I went to a security camera site to check their
    pricing and within a couple of hours every page I open has security camera
    advertisments on it. It was a bother, now it's a worry.

    What the hell is going on? Is there a way I can stop it? I was thinking
    about checking the prices of a particular model of car and I have resisted
    for a couple of days just, at least, until someone tells me what or if there
    is anything I can do about this.

    Thanks in advance for all help.
     
    Tony Vella, Jul 15, 2011
    #1
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  2. Tony Vella

    Mayayana Guest

    If you allow cookies/script then you essentially have
    a tracking collar. Companies like Google/Doubleclick
    are tracking you around the Web. If you have a Microsoft
    LiveID they can track you around the Web. If you have
    any toolbars installed in IE, those can track you around
    the Web. Using the Address Bar as search is a sneaky
    way to track you around the Web. Allowing IE or Firefox
    to "warn you about risky sites" is just another trick to
    track you around the Web.

    Most websites are getting ads from large ad servers.
    Google/Doubleclick is on just about any site that has
    ads. That means they can use the ads as web beacons
    to track you around the Web. They make a big noise
    about how the data is "anonymized", but the simple fact
    is that they're spying on you alomst wherever you go online.
    To respect your privacy means to hurt their own business.

    This is nothing new. If you use a cellphone you're also
    being followed around physically. Advertising companies
    are salivating over the possibilities of showing you
    targetted ads on a constant basis, so that researching
    cars online might get you ads for auto insurance, for instance,
    for instance, while texting a friend about pizza might get
    you a spam coupon on your cellphone for 20% off Alka Seltzer
    at the drugstore you're currently walking past.

    You may just be seeing a change in behavior on the part
    of ad companies. They've been wary of scaring people off
    by letting them know just how much they're being spied on,
    so they're proceeding cautiously.

    There's no simple answer. If you don't want to be tracked
    online you need to block 3rd-party ads, script and cookies.
    Most people don't want to do that because it interferes
    with shopping and social network sites. That's your choice.

    If you want to mitigate the intrusion, one simple improvement
    is to use a HOSTS file and block Google/Doubleclick ad URLs and
    Google Analytics. That will eliminate most ads and thereby most
    tracking. (Some people might say it's wrong to block ads. But
    using a HOSTS file doesn't block ads. It only blocks files from
    websites that you never willingly agreed to visit in the first place.)
    Mozilla browsers also have a semi-hidden setting to block all
    3rd-party files, but Mozilla is funded mainly by Google, so they've
    removed that option from the Firefox settings and made a notable
    effort to confuse anyone who wants to use it via about:config.

    See here for more info:

    http://www.jsware.net/jsware/cook.php5

    Note that on Vista/7 you need to log on as Admin and give
    yourself permission to edit the HOSTS file.

    Beyond that, don't use IE and don't enable any "helpful"
    browser features in any browser. (Firefox's functionality
    to warn you about "attack sites" sends each visited URL
    to Google.) The reasons to avoid IE are complex and numerous.
    It's partly because IE is deeply linked into the system and
    is designed to be controlled by others. (It's made to allow
    corporate system admins to control employee behavior.)
    Another reason is that IE settings are *extremely*
    convoluted. Just controlling script settings turns into a
    hobby, while the noScript add-on for firefox allows fairly
    easy control over script.

    --
    --
    |I am using IE9 on a Vista machine.
    |
    | There is something going on that was first a bother and is now a worry.
    I
    | went to a business-card printing site to check their pricing and within a
    | couple of hours every website I open has business card printing
    | advertisments on it. I went to a security camera site to check their
    | pricing and within a couple of hours every page I open has security camera
    | advertisments on it. It was a bother, now it's a worry.
    |
    | What the hell is going on? Is there a way I can stop it? I was thinking
    | about checking the prices of a particular model of car and I have resisted
    | for a couple of days just, at least, until someone tells me what or if
    there
    | is anything I can do about this.
    |
    | Thanks in advance for all help.
    | --
    | Tony Vella
    | Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    | http://www.amedialuz.ca
    |
     
    Mayayana, Jul 15, 2011
    #2
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  3. Tony Vella

    Jim S Guest

    On IE9 you can go to Safety > Tracking Protection > Get a Tracking
    Protection list online. I use Easylist - when I (seldom) us IE.
    There are very few ads.
     
    Jim S, Jul 15, 2011
    #3
  4. Tony Vella

    VanguardLH Guest

    A web page isn't going to have ads in it unless THEY put them in their
    web page. So obviously not ALL web pages are going to have ads and so
    they won't have those for security cameras or card printing. If you see
    ads for a site that doesn't itself have any then you are viewing the web
    pages inside a frame with another frame used to present the ads from
    another domain. As an example of using frames to show content from
    different domains, go to http://translate.google.com/ and enter
    http://www.srware.net/forum/viewforum.php?f=17 and hit Enter. The top
    frame is Google and the bottom is the SRWare forum in German. Frames
    can be anywhere in the web page and may not have a border.

    So what happens when you exit ALL instances of IE9 and reload it? Exit
    IE9 and use the Processes tab in Task Manager to make sure there are no
    remnant instances of iexplore.exe. If there are, kill them (could be
    you visited a site that loaded a windowless instance of IE).

    If you still see the ads on web pages that don't themselves have them,
    you have been infected (voluntarily or covertly). Maybe you installed a
    toolbar. Maybe a popup said you needed to install a new version of
    Flash, a codec, or something else and you chose to comply and install
    whatever software they foisted onto your host. Have you tried loading
    IE in its no add-ons mode (after first making sure to exit all instances
    of it)?
     
    VanguardLH, Jul 15, 2011
    #4
  5. Tony Vella

    Tony Vella Guest

    Thank you very much for your response. No, I have not tried but I shall
    certainly try right now.

    Since my original post I have tried [tools > inprivate browsing > whatever
    webpage] and I have not had any ads. I have also changed the third-party
    cookies to 'block' and the first-party cookies to 'advise'. What I must
    remember now is to do the [tools > inprivate browsing] thing every time I
    open IE before doing anything else. Wish I could do it automatically
    because I can't rely on my memory very much any more.

    Thanks again.
     
    Tony Vella, Jul 15, 2011
    #5
  6. Tony Vella

    SC Tom Guest

    Copy the following 3 lines and paste them into a text document (Notepad or
    equivalent). Save it as InPrivateOn.REG. Right-click on it and pick Merge.
    InPrivate browsing will start automatically each time IE9 is started.
    ********start copy**********

    Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

    [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Safety\PrivacIE]

    "StartMode"=dword:00000001

    ********end copy***********



    Use the following lines to undo it, saved as InPrivateOff.REG:
    ********start copy**********

    Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

    [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Safety\PrivacIE]

    "StartMode"=dword:00000000

    ********end copy***********

    I did this for both IE9 on Win7HP and IE8 on WinXP and it works.
    --
    SC Tom


     
    SC Tom, Jul 15, 2011
    #6
  7. Tony Vella

    Mayayana Guest

    | On IE9 you can go to Safety > Tracking Protection > Get a Tracking
    | Protection list online. I use Easylist - when I (seldom) us IE.
    | There are very few ads.
    | --

    You may already know this, but there's a problem
    with using multiple lists that can cancel each other out:

    http://www.which.co.uk/news/2011/03/ie-9s-anti-tracking-feature-flawed-study-finds-247480/

    I found the content of EasyList here:

    http://easylist-msie.adblockplus.org/easyprivacy.tpl

    It contains quite a bit, but they seem to be trying to
    avoid stepping on anyone's toes at the same time.
    Neither doubleclick.net nor google/google-analytics
    is fully blocked, for instance.

    In my HOSTS file I have:

    pagead2.googlesyndication.com
    imageads.googleadservices.com
    www.google-analytics.com
    www.googleadservices.com

    Easylist has specific Google files and oddball
    Google domains blocked:

    /google-analyticator/
    - /google-analytics-for-wordpress/
    - /googleanalytics.swf
    - /googleanalyticsmanagement.swf

    Interesting. My small HOSTS file is blocking
    far more than that giant list blocks. I'm afraid
    that no one organization can be trusted with
    this stuff. Every company of any size has a
    vested interest in not helping people to avoid
    ads or tracking. And they seem to want to pretend
    that an ad is not a tracking device.
     
    Mayayana, Jul 15, 2011
    #7
  8. Tony Vella

    Jim S Guest

    That's interesting. However I was just making a point that tracking
    protection is built-in to IE9 and doesn't need a high degree of nerdity to
    use.
    I am aware of the dangers of multiple lists.
     
    Jim S, Jul 16, 2011
    #8
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