IPv6 AAAA host record on Windows 2003 SP1 DNS server

Discussion in 'DNS Server' started by sysadmin, Apr 17, 2006.

  1. sysadmin

    sysadmin Guest

    I'm trying to learn more about IPv6 by getting some hands on experience
    following some brain-numbing theory.

    So far I've got a stand-alone Windows 2003 SP1 server on a private test lab
    LAN running DNS services with a forward lookup zone of, say, mydomain.com.
    The Win2003 box has got IPv6 installed.

    'ipconfig' shows that I've got 2 IPv6 addreses on the NIC: a link-local
    address and an automatic tunneling pseudo interface (what ever that is).

    If I understand correctly, the link local address is created by assigning
    the prefix 'fe80' along with the unique MAC address on the network card that
    has had 'fffe' inserted and a certain bit complemented. Is this link-local
    address a static address (in the same sense as an IPv4 static address)?

    On the Win2003 DNS box I created a AAAA IPv6 host record pairing up the
    above link-local address to the FQDN of the Win2003 DNS box.

    From a Vista client on the same network I can ping the FQDN of the Win2003
    DNS box and get an IPv6 reply/response with the link-local address. OK.
    Vista prefers IPv6 connectivity over IPv4.

    1st problem:
    If I reboot the Win2003 box the AAAA host record disappears! Is there a
    reason for this? Is there some sort of DNS cleanup process that
    automatically runs and finds 'fe80' link-local addresses and deletes them
    because, perhaps, they're not supposed to be manually created? Perhaps I'm
    supposed to have a real globally routeable IPv6 address in there thats been
    assigned to me from an IPv6 ISP?

    2nd problem:
    The first ping attempt from the Vista client (after any reboot of the
    client) always fails because it is using the wrong interface. The 2nd and
    subseqent ping attempts are successful. See below:

    C:\Users\admin>ping lab.mydomain.com

    Pinging lab.mydomain.com [fe80::330:98ff:fea7:7236] from fe80::22fc:2310:
    38da%13 with 32 bytes of data:

    Request timed out.
    General failure.
    General failure.
    General failure.

    Ping statistics for fe80::330:98ff:fea7:7236:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 0, Lost = 4 (100% loss),

    C:\Users\admin>ping lab.mydomain.com

    Pinging lab.mydomain.com [fe80::330:98ff:fea7:7236] from fe80::240:e6ff:f
    ea3:3782%10 with 32 bytes of data:

    Reply from fe80::330:98ff:fea7:7236: time<1ms
    Reply from fe80::330:98ff:fea7:7236: time<1ms
    Reply from fe80::330:98ff:fea7:7236: time<1ms
    Reply from fe80::330:98ff:fea7:7236: time<1ms

    Ping statistics for fe80::330:98ff:fea7:7236:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
    Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 0ms, Average = 0ms

    C:\Users\admin>

    3rd problem:

    From a WinXP SP2 client with IPv6 installed on the same network i cannot
    ping the FQDN of the Win2003 DNS box. ping -6 <fqdn> and ping6 <fqdn>
    doesn't work. However it works if I specify the source IPv6
    address/interface:

    ping6 -s <source IPv6 address on WinXP SP2 box> <fqdn of Win2003 DNS box>

    Why isn't it smart enough to use the correct source address?

    Comments?
     
    sysadmin, Apr 17, 2006
    #1
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