IPv6 DHCP and static address

Discussion in 'Server Networking' started by Rudolf Meier, Oct 13, 2009.

  1. Rudolf Meier

    Rudolf Meier Guest

    Hi...

    I did give my server a static IPv6 address and, it's running a DHCPv6 server
    on it... but, the server still get's an additional IPv6 address from this
    DHCP ... why? (and it is also entering this address into the dns server...
    this leads to problems, if a server has more than one address and if it
    might change it's address one day... so, I don't want it to get an other
    address than the static one... there's no need for a second one...)

    Rudolf
     
    Rudolf Meier, Oct 13, 2009
    #1
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  2. Hello Rudolf,

    Sounds for me that the hardware has 2 NICs and the unused one is not disabled.

    Best regards

    Meinolf Weber
     
    Meinolf Weber [MVP-DS], Oct 14, 2009
    #2
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  3. Rudolf Meier

    Rudolf Meier Guest

    Hi
    It has even more than 2 NICs... but I have all NICs under controll, except
    the one that has IPv6 enabled... this NIC has 3 IPs (v6) ... an fe80, an
    fd00 -> the static one I set... and, an other fd00 that it got from the DHCP
    which is responding on the static IPv6 address of this interface...

    Rudolf
     
    Rudolf Meier, Oct 14, 2009
    #3

  4. Is this server a domain controller?

    Does it have RRAS installed? If so, that can be where the additional IP is
    coming from.

    Ace
     
    Ace Fekay [MCT], Oct 15, 2009
    #4
  5. Rudolf Meier

    Rudolf Meier Guest

    Hi
    Yes... but why a second one on that interface? ... *hmm* but you're right...
    I remeber, that I heart something like that before... I'll try to find out
    more... thanks

    Rudolf
     
    Rudolf Meier, Oct 16, 2009
    #5

  6. Hi Rudolf,

    RRAS pulls a block of 10 IPs at a time from DHCP. It will register into DNS
    with the IPs it gives a client machine connecting to it under the server's
    name. This is problematic for AD, which is why we recommend against using
    RRAS on a DC. If you want to continue using RRAS on the DC, please read the
    following on how to control DNS registration wtih the additional IPs that
    incur from RRAS. Keep in mind it requires registry changes to the Netlogon
    registry key to control it. This key is what registers data into DNS on a
    domain controller, not the actual interface.

    Multihomed DCs with DNS, RRAS, multiple IPs, and/or PPPoE adapters
    http://msmvps.com/blogs/acefekay/ar...-dcs-with-dns-rras-and-or-pppoe-adapters.aspx

    Ace
     
    Ace Fekay [MCT], Oct 16, 2009
    #6
  7. Rudolf Meier

    Rudolf Meier Guest

    Hi
    ok... I don't know if this is a problem at the moment, because IPv6 RAS is
    disabled... but, other question now... does SBS not include all those roles?
    and do they not run on the same machine?

    anyway... thank's for the link... that's for shure something I'll have to go
    through... I know... but I didn't find the link anymore :)

    about the initial problem... I think this has to do with the stateless and
    statefull configuration of the interface... but... I will first have to read
    some documents until I can say more...

    Rudolf
     
    Rudolf Meier, Oct 16, 2009
    #7

  8. AHHHH, I should have asked which version of the operating system you are
    running. If I knew it was SBS, I wouldn't have posted that link, and I would
    have redirected you to post to the SBS newsgroup. SBS is different. Wizards
    will handle most of the configurations for you. I cross-posted it so my
    current reply will go to both this group and the SBS group where those folks
    are better equipped to answer your questions.

    Original question:

    Hi...

    I did give my server a static IPv6 address and, it's running a DHCPv6 server
    on it... but, the server still get's an additional IPv6 address from this
    DHCP ... why? (and it is also entering this address into the dns server...
    this leads to problems, if a server has more than one address and if it
    might change it's address one day... so, I don't want it to get an other
    address than the static one... there's no need for a second one...)

    Rudolf





    Ace
     
    Ace Fekay [MCT], Oct 16, 2009
    #8
  9. Rudolf Meier

    Rudolf Meier Guest

    AHHHH, I should have asked which version of the operating system you are
    Hi

    Sorry for this missunderstanding but... I'm not running SBS... I was just
    wondering, how they do it on SBS... :) ... but now it's clear... so, SBS is
    not just a "normal" server, but a server with special wizards and
    assistants... very interesting... and... a bit strange... but, that's how
    Microsoft seems to solve those problems... first create them and then create
    a registry hack and sell it as SBS :)

    .... again... I'm currently investigating those configuration modes of IPv6
    that are available... and, I'll post it here if I can find out something...

    Rudolf
     
    Rudolf Meier, Oct 16, 2009
    #9

  10. Oh, I assumed you meant this was SBS. My bad for the assumption.

    I wouldn't exactly say they are registry hacks put together and sold as SBS,
    nor is it strange. It's not like that. It's an optimized package based on
    Standard Server edition for small entities. It has limitations due to the
    additional products (SQL, Exchange, ISA, etc), offered in one package for
    the low prices that it sells for compared if you were to purchase the
    products separately, as well as designed to run on one server.

    As far as IPv6, it works the same on SBS and non-SBS. IPv6 is IPv6.

    If the DNS address you are getting is ::1, that is put in from dcpromo when
    promoting a machine to a DC. I usually delete that out, or more
    specifically, disable IPv6 completely because most of my customers are small
    to medium size infrastructures and do not have the equipment in place to
    handle IPv6.

    My feeling about IPv6 is that to completely support it, routers in the
    infrastructure need to support it, as well as other machines to fully gain
    any benefits. I've seen scenarios where IPv6 is used in a backbone (such as
    in a BGP scenario in a large university) and handled between routers,
    however the local client subnets are all IPv4. So since I am not in that
    scenario with my small to medium sized customers, I simply disable it.

    Ace
     
    Ace Fekay [MCT], Oct 17, 2009
    #10
  11. Rudolf Meier

    Bill Grant Guest

    ::1 is the IPv6 loopback address, and just means "use the local machine",
    just like 127.0.0.1 in IPv4.
     
    Bill Grant, Oct 17, 2009
    #11

  12. I kind of figured that because I know from past experience that dcpromo puts
    that in there, just as in 2003 putting in the loopback. Thanks for
    confirming that!

    Ace
     
    Ace Fekay [MCT], Oct 18, 2009
    #12
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