IT Staff Size

Discussion in 'Server Networking' started by p3jeff, Oct 26, 2004.

  1. p3jeff

    p3jeff Guest

    I was wondering if anyone could give some input on something. I am looking
    to see what the average size of an IT Department is for 80 - 100 Users. If
    anyone could give me some insight or even a good website to retrieve this
    information from I would appreciate it.

    Thanks, Jeff
     
    p3jeff, Oct 26, 2004
    #1
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  2. We fall exactly into the 80-100. Our IT staff is one,...Me. There is a
    Webmaster that takes care of the website's content that also "covers" for me
    when I am on vacation.
     
    Phillip Windell, Oct 26, 2004
    #2
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  3. p3jeff

    Eric Graham Guest

    We too fall into this catagory. I am also the only IT person, and I have a
    total of 5 warehouses in 3 different states I take care of. Unliuke Phillip
    I also am the webmaster, luckily my CFO knows a lot about computers, so I do
    have someone to cover for me.

    I can also tell you my last job was at a college campus, and there were 3 of
    us in the IT department that serviced over a 1000 students, around 17
    buildings, and about a 100 faculty and staff. It was a realativly small
    campus compared to some.

    Hope this gives you some insight.

    Eric
     
    Eric Graham, Oct 26, 2004
    #3
  4. In other words,..we are slaves! They just let us were shoes and our shirts
    aren't torn.. :)
     
    Phillip Windell, Oct 26, 2004
    #4
  5. p3jeff

    Tim Bott Guest

    Being the only IT guy has it's benefits, though. Like...TOTAL job security.
    "Nobody else here knows how to do this stuff. Gimme a raise!"

     
    Tim Bott, Oct 26, 2004
    #5
  6. p3jeff

    Dana Brash Guest

    Yah, except most the time "Gimme a raise" gets you as far as the stack of
    resumes on HR's desk, file cabinet, and email inbox....

    Unfortunately, 1999 came and went.

    --
    HTH,
    =d=


    Dana Brash
    MCSE, MCDBA, MCSA



     
    Dana Brash, Oct 26, 2004
    #6
  7. p3jeff

    Roland Hall Guest

    in message : Yah, except most the time "Gimme a raise" gets you as far as the stack of
    : resumes on HR's desk, file cabinet, and email inbox....
    :
    : Unfortunately, 1999 came and went.

    Yes and now the users wait, and wait, and wait for support, the equipment
    gets outdated, projects cannot take place without outsourcing, preventative
    maintenance suffers, and the CFO eventually ends up selling the company,
    putting the whole IT [1 person] out of a job.

    Show me a CFO in charge of an IT department [which you could hardly call
    with one person] and I'll show you someone who skimps on hardware, software,
    tools, training, maintenance and upgrades, not to mention pay for the IT
    support guy/gal buried somewhere underneath a desk somewhere.

    However, I'm still trying to get over the statement that the CFO is a
    technical backup. So, how many CFOs does it take to fix a computer? Nobody
    knows. It's never been done.

    What you've given the OP is a false sense that one person can run a network
    of 80-100 people and while that may be true for break fix, there is more to
    break fix in supporting a network. Surely I'm preaching to the choir. And,
    what happens tomorrow when that one person doesn't show up for work anymore,
    for whatever reason? That's not how you run a business. That's how you run
    a business into the ground.

    The last CFO I worked for said, "We're not upgrading until the hardware and
    software mature." We all knew upgrades would never happen until he did the
    same.

    --
    Roland Hall
    /* This information is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but
    without any warranty; without even the implied warranty of merchantability
    or fitness for a particular purpose. */
    Online Support for IT Professionals -
    http://support.microsoft.com/servicedesks/technet/default.asp?fr=0&sd=tech
    How-to: Windows 2000 DNS:
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;308201
    FAQ W2K/2K3 DNS:
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;291382
     
    Roland Hall, Oct 28, 2004
    #7
  8. p3jeff

    Eric Graham Guest

    Acctually my CFO knows what he is doing when it comes to computers, and I
    didn't say he backs me up on everything when I'm gone. All I can say is
    thank goodness for VPN.
     
    Eric Graham, Oct 28, 2004
    #8
  9. p3jeff

    Dana Brash Guest

    Yes and now the users wait, and wait, and wait for support, the equipment
    Let alone properly testing updates and getting those rolled out in something
    resembling adequate time, or managing the PII's they want us to install XP
    on, with 64mb RAM ("My computer's too slow, XP sucks!"... yeah right!).
    Problem is, if you're working in a sub 100 company (and even many larger
    ones) they're busy making every penny count. Or so they think. I believe
    the typical response is very 'penny wise, pound foolish'.

    It's hard to sell the CFO on the benefit of a solid IT department. They
    seem to lose track of "soft" costs such as lost opportunities due to
    ineffective systems, missing emails, server downtimes, etc... and wait until
    a problem truly bites them before realizing there's a problem. Of course,
    then the problem is that the staff of one IT person didn't manage the
    problem correctly. Did you ever notice how the C??'s inability to listen to
    warnings translates into IT's lack of communication?

    Instead of griping (which I've certainly been known to do) I wonder if we,
    the smart ones, couldn't put our heads together and figure out a better way
    to demonstrate the value that we bring to a company when we work together
    with a properly sized team? It's really hard to point at ROI or something
    that the people controlling the purse strings will understand, particularly
    when they don't understand the technology. AND they certainly don't
    understand the amount of time it takes to stay on top of the technology,
    reading, testing, experimenting, etc. They must think we LIKE to work 16
    hour days, and that if we only knew what we were doing we wouldn't have to.

    I believe we all think better in groups, and are far more effective and
    efficient that way. After all, isn't that why we're here (in the
    newsgroups)? How do we convince the C??'s to bring us together in the
    company? WE need to learn to prove that, by paying two, or three, or more
    salaries, the company will realize larger ROI in the end. Then step up to
    the plate and make the presentations.

    EVERY project has a budget, whether you want to manage it or not: there is
    ALWAYS a bottom line.

    --
    HTH,
    =d=


    Dana Brash
    MCSE, MCDBA, MCSA

     
    Dana Brash, Oct 28, 2004
    #9
  10. That's why I like the MVP "gatherings" MS has a couple times a year.
    Although, my employer has their problems,... many you've "nailed",...it
    isn't the "end of the world in the next five minutes" either. When I go to
    the MVP events they count it as a regular work day and don't count it
    against my vacation time, so effectively I am getting paid to attend. I've
    discovered that my attitude and outlook after I return from hanging out with
    the other MVPs and MS Staff for the few days I attended is a little less
    "dark & gloomy" than it usually is .
     
    Phillip Windell, Oct 28, 2004
    #10
  11. p3jeff

    Tim Bott Guest

    Thankfully, my CFO, while not entirely understanding the scope of my work and
    the complicated things I do, is easy to convince when it comes to technology
    investments. Never thought I'd say this, but I partially thank the
    government! $100,000 small business technology tax write offs is awfully
    nice.
     
    Tim Bott, Oct 28, 2004
    #11
  12. Don't thank the government, thank Bush. If Kerry wins you'll lose that, he
    has already promised to roll that all back again. He specifically stated
    that in each of the three debates and in pretty much every speech he has
    made,...when he isn't whining about Iraq.

    Many small business aren't "incorperated" so the owner pays the business's
    taxes under the normal individual income taxes. It is very common for a
    small business to gross over $200k per year (not saying they get to keep it)
    which means they have a big bullseye on them with Kerry saying he is going
    to roll back the tax cuts on those over $200k per year.

    "Nailing" the small business in this way means job losses, heavey budget
    cutting, and some go out of business.
     
    Phillip Windell, Oct 28, 2004
    #12
  13. p3jeff

    Roland Hall Guest

    in message
    : Acctually my CFO knows what he is doing when it comes to computers, and I
    : didn't say he backs me up on everything when I'm gone. All I can say is
    : thank goodness for VPN.
    :
    Eric...

    That's great that you feel that he can do that but with all due respect,
    you're still referring to break-fix. And, if you're the only support
    person, he doesn't understand computers at all, IMHO.

    --
    Roland Hall
    /* This information is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but
    without any warranty; without even the implied warranty of merchantability
    or fitness for a particular purpose. */
    Online Support for IT Professionals -
    http://support.microsoft.com/servicedesks/technet/default.asp?fr=0&sd=tech
    How-to: Windows 2000 DNS:
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;308201
    FAQ W2K/2K3 DNS:
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;291382
     
    Roland Hall, Nov 1, 2004
    #13
  14. p3jeff

    Roland Hall Guest

    in message :> Yes and now the users wait, and wait, and wait for support, the equipment
    : > gets outdated, projects cannot take place without outsourcing,
    : > preventative
    : > maintenance suffers, and the CFO eventually ends up selling the company,
    : > putting the whole IT [1 person] out of a job.
    : >
    :
    : Let alone properly testing updates and getting those rolled out in
    something
    : resembling adequate time, or managing the PII's they want us to install XP
    : on, with 64mb RAM ("My computer's too slow, XP sucks!"... yeah right!).
    : Problem is, if you're working in a sub 100 company (and even many larger
    : ones) they're busy making every penny count. Or so they think. I believe
    : the typical response is very 'penny wise, pound foolish'.
    :
    : It's hard to sell the CFO on the benefit of a solid IT department. They
    : seem to lose track of "soft" costs such as lost opportunities due to
    : ineffective systems, missing emails, server downtimes, etc... and wait
    until
    : a problem truly bites them before realizing there's a problem. Of course,
    : then the problem is that the staff of one IT person didn't manage the
    : problem correctly. Did you ever notice how the C??'s inability to listen
    to
    : warnings translates into IT's lack of communication?
    :
    : Instead of griping (which I've certainly been known to do) I wonder if we,
    : the smart ones, couldn't put our heads together and figure out a better
    way
    : to demonstrate the value that we bring to a company when we work together
    : with a properly sized team? It's really hard to point at ROI or something
    : that the people controlling the purse strings will understand,
    particularly
    : when they don't understand the technology. AND they certainly don't
    : understand the amount of time it takes to stay on top of the technology,
    : reading, testing, experimenting, etc. They must think we LIKE to work 16
    : hour days, and that if we only knew what we were doing we wouldn't have
    to.
    :
    : I believe we all think better in groups, and are far more effective and
    : efficient that way. After all, isn't that why we're here (in the
    : newsgroups)? How do we convince the C??'s to bring us together in the
    : company? WE need to learn to prove that, by paying two, or three, or more
    : salaries, the company will realize larger ROI in the end. Then step up to
    : the plate and make the presentations.
    :
    : EVERY project has a budget, whether you want to manage it or not: there is
    : ALWAYS a bottom line.

    It is my belief that with most C??, when they achieve that title, it
    requires sacrifice of three things; heart, brain and soul. Why would a
    finance officer consider themselves qualified to make technical decisions?
    They're not qualified. They have no education or experience in doing that.
    Their title should not "qualify" them to make those decisions. That is not
    what a CFO is trained to do. I believe it all stems from a need to control
    and a thirst for power, like Scary Fricken Kerry. He has been lying to
    everybody so long he actually has convinced himself all his lies are true.
    The Commander in Chief does not need to be a military genius. He needs to
    be a manager of military geniuses. The CFO needs to manage the money. The
    CIO, CTO, CISO, IT Directory, IT Manager, etc. should answer directly to the
    CEO, not the CFO. IT falls under Operations, not Finance. All the CFO
    needs to concern him/herself with is budgeting. S/He should not be making
    technical decisions of whether x is required but rather if $ is available
    for x.

    I don't see a need for educating the CFO or the CEO. If there is not a CIO,
    CTO, CISO, IT Director or IT Manager, then the CEO should be the person
    making the decisions, not the CFO. And, the CEO should be well aware that
    S/He is NOT the person doing the work. S/He is the top manager of the
    company and there is no I in TEAM. An effective manager knows how to
    surround him/herself with competent personnel and puts their trust in them
    while helping them to manage their time and projects and is also a buffer to
    upper management. The biggest downfall for any IT department is not having
    a peer to the other C??s. Setting policy is a lot better than being subject
    to policies made by someone technically ignorant.

    If you wouldn't let the kid down the block work on your transmission, why
    would you ever let anyone unqualified on your network with administrative
    privileges?

    A CFO will approve the $12k for the new color printer but will deny the
    purchase of the 30% router annual maintenance. Why? Two reasons:

    1. He knows what a printer is and his assistant uses it to print out his
    charts for this meetings so he can tell them how much money he's saving them
    by controlling the IT department.
    2. He doesn't know what a router is, couldn't pick it out of a line up and
    doesn't think you need one of those luxury items.

    The most ridiculous thing I ever heard a CFO say was, "I think we have too
    many servers. We should look at getting rid of a few." I told my boss,
    "Ok. Tell him to pick out the ones he doesn't want and I'll shut them
    down." Just like the sign I saw on the bathroom wall, "We aim to please.
    You aim too, please!"

    --
    Roland Hall
    /* This information is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but
    without any warranty; without even the implied warranty of merchantability
    or fitness for a particular purpose. */
    Online Support for IT Professionals -
    http://support.microsoft.com/servicedesks/technet/default.asp?fr=0&sd=tech
    How-to: Windows 2000 DNS:
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;308201
    FAQ W2K/2K3 DNS:
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;291382
     
    Roland Hall, Nov 1, 2004
    #14
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