java update icon appears in task tray

Discussion in 'Windows Vista General Discussion' started by Mike F from TN, Apr 1, 2008.

  1. Shortly after installing Vista Service Pack 1, I discovered an icon in my
    task tray that urges me to update Java. Here is the detail:
    Java SE Runtime Environment 6 Update 3:
    "C:\Program Files\java\jre1.6.0_03\bin\jucheck.exe"

    I am a user only. Don't even know or care what Java is unless it's needed on
    my pc. I don't do games or other resource-intense stuff like music. I do do a
    lot of photos, Word docs, and financial things. Do I need this update, and if
    not, how the blazes do I get it off my task tray? Thanks, Mike
     
    Mike F from TN, Apr 1, 2008
    #1
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  2. Mike F from TN

    Gene K Guest

    Mike,
    Yes, you need Java to access many Web Sites. Go get the update.
    Gene K
     
    Gene K, Apr 1, 2008
    #2
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  3. Thanks, Gene. I have heard there are some security issues with Java. Can you
    explain, before I go ahead and update? Mike
     
    Mike F from TN, Apr 1, 2008
    #3
  4. Mike F from TN

    Alias Guest

    And that's why it's important to keep it up-to-date.

    Can you
    After you install the update, go to the Control Panel/Add Remove
    Programs and remove all the Java entries except the latest one.

    Alias
     
    Alias, Apr 1, 2008
    #4
  5. Mike F from TN

    Qu0ll Guest

    I'd be interested to investigate those supposed security issues. Java is
    just about the most secure software you will ever find.

    Use it without fear.

    --
    And loving it,

    -Q
    _________________________________________________

    (Replace the "SixFour" with numbers to email me)
     
    Qu0ll, Apr 1, 2008
    #5
  6. Perhaps I worded that wrong. As a user only and not very literate in this
    area, I don't know how to express such questions. What I heard was that some
    websites can do nasty things to our computers and that Java applets (or some
    such word) were the culprits. Does that help?
     
    Mike F from TN, Apr 1, 2008
    #6
  7. Mike F from TN

    Qu0ll Guest

    I really don't know where you heard such nonsense! Java applets run in
    so-called "sandbox" which significantly restricts what they can do. They
    cannot access your local computer unless the applet is signed by a security
    company AND you explicitly give it permission to do so. Almost all applets
    are unsigned which means that it is impossible for them to do *anything* to
    your computer let alone nasty things.

    Java applets are much, much safer than Microsoft ActiveX controls and, as I
    said, you can use them with absolute confidence. There may be web sites
    that do nasty things to computers but they have nothing to do with Java.

    --
    And loving it,

    -Q
    _________________________________________________

    (Replace the "SixFour" with numbers to email me)
     
    Qu0ll, Apr 1, 2008
    #7
  8. Mike F from TN

    Gene K Guest

    Mike,
    I have heard of security issus with Java; however, I have no specific
    knowledge of the facts. It is likely that the update may fix those holes.
    There are security issues with all software, Java (and javascript) included.
    You will never feel completely safe. GET THE UPDATE.
    Gene K
     
    Gene K, Apr 1, 2008
    #8
  9. No matter what Sun claims it's java runtimes are almost *always*
    vulnerable to applets escalating privileges. Here's the latest brouhaha
    theory:

    More details on the Pwn2Own Flash flaw that won the Vista machine
    http://blogs.zdnet.com/security/?p=993
    There has been an never ending issuance of Sec bulletins from Sun that
    involve said applet escalation. The latest ones were:

    http://sunsolve.sun.com/search/document.do?assetkey=1-66-233321-1

    And then one discovers that the java autoupdater leaves the older,
    'affected' versions installed. Not only is that a security risk, no
    matter what Sun claims, but disk space is being hogged by said older,
    'affected' versions.
    IF, as Sun claims, said older, 'affected' versions can not be called by
    malware authors then why is this included at the *very bottom* of all
    Sun Sec bulletins ? -

    Java has been uninstalled on all of my systems and there have been
    absolutely NO issues using any web site.


    MowGreen [MVP 2003-2008]
    ===============
    *-343-* FDNY
    Never Forgotten
    ===============
     
    MowGreen [MVP], Apr 1, 2008
    #9
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