Meaning of (triangle)Error?

Discussion in 'Windows Vista Mail' started by CWLee, Oct 12, 2008.

  1. CWLee

    CWLee Guest

    I'm using Vista Ultimate, 64 bit. Windows Mail works fine,
    and I use it with two different dialup connections.

    In the lower right corner of the Windows Mail screen there
    is a space which contains various reports, such as "checking
    mail", "no new mail", etc. After checking for new mail, in
    about 3-5 minutes a message appears that consists of a
    yellow triangle, within which there is an exclamation mark
    (!) and then the word "Error".

    I suspect this error message is caused by my computer
    automatically checking both dialup accounts, and since only
    one is active at a time, it is unable to connect to the
    inactive one. I'd like to confirm this, or understand it
    better. Ideas?

    Thanks.

    --
     
    CWLee, Oct 12, 2008
    #1
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  2. CWLee

    mac Guest

    Double click the yellow triangle>copy and paste the error message into your
    reply.
     
    mac, Oct 12, 2008
    #2
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  3. CWLee

    CWLee Guest

    Here is what I get, with Xs added to provide some privacy:

    "Account: 'pop3.Xch.edu', Server: 'pop3.Xch.edu', Protocol:
    POP3, Server Response: '-ERR Cannot connect to POP server
    10.XX.0.2 (10.XX.0.2:110), connect error 10060', Port: 110,
    Secure(SSL): No, Server Error: 0x800CCC90, Error Number:
    0x800CCC90"

    This is the reason I suspect MS Mail is trying to use the
    dialup connection that is not active at that time. Why is
    it trying to do that? Is there an easy way to stop that? I
    do switch back and forth between the two dialup connections,
    and I'd prefer the system not check the inactive connection,
    so that the error message does not occur. (This is really a
    very minor problem for me - really just an irritant - but
    sometimes there are easy ways to get rid of nits like this.)

    Thanks.
     
    CWLee, Oct 13, 2008
    #3
  4. CWLee

    CWLee Guest

    Here is what I get, with Xs added to provide some privacy:

    "Account: 'pop3.Xch.edu', Server: 'pop3.Xch.edu', Protocol:
    POP3, Server Response: '-ERR Cannot connect to POP server
    10.XX.0.2 (10.XX.0.2:110), connect error 10060', Port: 110,
    Secure(SSL): No, Server Error: 0x800CCC90, Error Number:
    0x800CCC90"

    This is the reason I suspect MS Mail is trying to use the
    dialup connection that is not active at that time. Why is
    it trying to do that? Is there an easy way to stop that? I
    do switch back and forth between the two dialup connections,
    and I'd prefer the system not check the inactive connection,
    so that the error message does not occur. (This is really a
    very minor problem for me - really just an irritant - but
    sometimes there are easy ways to get rid of nits like this.)

    Thanks.
     
    CWLee, Oct 13, 2008
    #4
  5. Any IP address that starts with 10.X is not routable on
    the Internet. It is used strictly for Local Area networks.
    The question then becomes, what is substituting 10.XX.0.2
    for pop3.Xch.edu? Are you running an anti-spam program?

    From your headers I see you are using Avast antivirus to
    scan emails. That is a no-no as far as Windows Mail is
    concerned. For more on why scanning emails is bad, see
    http://thundercloud.net/infoave/tutorials/email-scanning/index.htm

    Chances are, you installed Avast antivirus using its default install option.
    If so, uninstall it, then reinstall, but select 'custom' install, which then
    allows you to unselect installing its troublesome email scanning module.

    After Avast is uninstalled, and before reinstalling, reboot your PC, then
    try Windows Mail again, just to verify that the culprit has been found.
     
    Gary VanderMolen, Oct 13, 2008
    #5
  6. CWLee

    CWLee Guest

    Sorry, Gary, but I believe I confused you - perhaps you are
    joining the thread late, and did not read the original
    submission. I am the OP. I substituted the X and XX (that
    you mentioned) in place of digits to disguise the real
    locations, which are not relevant for the issue.

    I do have Avast anti-virus, and it has (so far) not caused
    me any problems of which I am aware.

    I will check the reference you provided.

    Thanks for your frequent constructive assistance to so many
    of us who read this newsgroup.

    ==========================
     
    CWLee, Oct 13, 2008
    #6
  7. I was fully aware that your 'XX' was a substitution for
    the real characters (for privacy reasons). I stand by my
    previous comments.
     
    Gary VanderMolen, Oct 13, 2008
    #7
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