Merging two drives into one?

Discussion in 'Windows Vista File Management' started by It Is Me Here, Apr 7, 2008.

  1. I've just got my new computer (Windows Vista Ultimate) and despite it coming
    with just one hard drive (if I'm not mistaken), when I open Computer, it
    displays two different hard drives: "OS_Install (C:) [102 GB free of 231 GB]"
    and "New Volume (D:) [465 GB free of 465 GB]".

    Anyway, how, instead of working with this bizarre set-up, could I "merge"
    C:\ and D:\ into one hard drive (in Windows Explorer's eyes, at least) so
    that I do not have files arbitrarily split into two?
     
    It Is Me Here, Apr 7, 2008
    #1
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  2. It Is Me Here

    Gordon Guest

    Are you really saying that the OS install takes up ONE HUNDRED AND TWENTY
    NINE GB?
    It's not a "bizarre" setup - many users have their machines setup this way.
    There are some advantages in having your HDD partitioned into two - OS and
    apps go on the C drive, data goes on the D drive. It simplifies data backup,
    and in the event of having to re-install the OS (not Restore you notice),
    the data remains untouched.
    And no, files are NOT "arbitrarily split in two", you cannot split a file
    across two partitions.
     
    Gordon, Apr 7, 2008
    #2
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  3. Apparently so
    Well, maybe, but I'm going to run out of space on my apps drive (i.e. C:\)
    pretty soon, so I'd rather just bung them together. If you could tell me how
    to do that, that would be great.
     
    It Is Me Here, Apr 7, 2008
    #3
  4. It Is Me Here

    Bob Guest

    What makes you think they are?

    In all likelihood you don't have two hard drives. You have two partitions on
    one hard drive. There is nothing bizarre about it.
     
    Bob, Apr 7, 2008
    #4

  5. Something is very much wrong with those numbers. If 102GB is free out
    of 231GB, that means that 129GB is in use. That's an *enormous* number
    for a computer you just got, and is almost certainly wrong.




    Bizarre? Why is it bizarre? In fact, it's very common. You have one
    physical drive, which has been partitioned into two logical drives.
    Many people prefer such a setup, especially those who have a very
    large physical drive, such as your 696GB drive (your manufacturer
    probably calls this a 750GB drive).


    Files are *never* split in two, arbitrarily or not. You have two
    logical drives, which are treated just as if they were two physical
    drives. What gets put on each drive (always complete files, never
    split ones) is entirely up to you, and there's nothing arbitrary about
    it.

    Yes, there are ways to change this so you have a single partition
    rather than two, but before you decide to do this, you should learn
    something about the reasons why people *choose* to do what you call
    "bizarre," and decide for yourself what kind of partition setup best
    meets *your* needs.

    I'm sure that others will respond, telling you why they prefer two or
    more partitions, but in the meantime, I suggest that you read my
    thoughts on partitioning at
    http://www.computorcompanion.com/LPMArticle.asp?ID=326
     
    Ken Blake, MVP, Apr 7, 2008
    #5
  6. Thanks, that was really interesting, and I'm more convinced than ever now to
    departition my drive and have one logical drive. So, how would I go about
    doing that?

     
    It Is Me Here, Apr 9, 2008
    #6
  7. It Is Me Here

    Bob Guest

    "If it ain't broke, don't fix it".

     
    Bob, Apr 9, 2008
    #7
  8. Well, the problem is that my C:\ drive WILL soon be 'broke' in that it will
    be full up.

    Can someone please just tell me how to stick the two drives back together
    without blowing my PC up?

     
    It Is Me Here, May 5, 2008
    #8
  9. It Is Me Here

    Gordon Guest

    Then move data to the D drive.....
     
    Gordon, May 5, 2008
    #9
  10. Yes, but that would mean that some of my files are in C:\ and some are in D:\
    for no apparent reason (i.e. not because I had organised my files to be like
    that), which would not be very convenient for me.
     
    It Is Me Here, May 5, 2008
    #10
  11. It Is Me Here

    Gordon Guest

    No, move ALL your Documents and Videos and Pictures to the D drive. It's
    terribly easy....you can move your email and favorites too.
     
    Gordon, May 5, 2008
    #11
  12. It Is Me Here

    Brink Guest

    Hello,

    This tutorial will show you how to delete the D partition and extend
    the C partition to make C one large drive again.

    http://www.vistax64.com/tutorials/95418-disk-management-delete-extend.html

    Hope this helps you,
    Shawn


    --
    Brink

    *There are no dumb questions, just the people that do not ask
    them.*
    '*VISTA FORUMS*' (http://www.vistax64.com)
    *Please post feedback to help others.*
     
    Brink, May 5, 2008
    #12
  13. Thanks for the guide, but I have a problem with following it. I managed to
    delete D:\ OK, but the option to Extend Volume for C:\ is still greyed out.
    This does not change after a reboot, nor after enabling and logging on as the
    Administrator account.

     
    It Is Me Here, May 6, 2008
    #13
  14. It Is Me Here

    Martin Guest

    If I were you, I would recreate the D drive and transfer your user
    folders to D. The idea of having 2 drives is that you have all your
    personal folders on D, with the OS and installed programs on C.

    Before you do anything else ( I was too late to say this before you
    deleted D) make sure you have backups of all your files and a plan for
    if it all goes wrong and you find you cannot boot Vista anymore.

     
    Martin, May 6, 2008
    #14
  15. It Is Me Here

    Brink Guest

    If you wanted to keep the drive partition as Martin suggested, then you
    can pick up on Step Two in this tutorial to create it again.

    http://www.vistax64.com/tutorials/95398-disk-management-shrink-partition.html

    Shawn


    --
    Brink

    *There are no dumb questions, just the people that do not ask
    them.*
    '*VISTA FORUMS*' (http://www.vistax64.com)
    *Please post feedback to help others.*
     
    Brink, May 6, 2008
    #15
  16. It Is Me Here

    Brink Guest

    Is the D: partition directly to the right of the C: partition? If not,
    then you will not be able to extend C: into the D: one.

    You might also double check to make sure that you only have one hard
    drive and not two since your first post indicated you may be mistaken
    about it.


    --
    Brink

    *There are no dumb questions, just the people that do not ask
    them.*
    '*VISTA FORUMS*' (http://www.vistax64.com)
    *Please post feedback to help others.*
     
    Brink, May 6, 2008
    #16
  17. How would I know if it's to the right? I thought that logical drives didn't
    have set "positions" as such?
     
    It Is Me Here, May 6, 2008
    #17
  18. It Is Me Here

    Brink Guest

    When you are looking at it in Disk Management, and from the example
    screenshot in the tutorial, look to see if D: is directly to the right
    of C: . If it is not and say two or more over, then you will need to
    use a 3 rd party program like Acronis Disk Director or set it up that
    way during the installation of Vista.

    It is this is way because Disk Management cannot move fixed files like
    the Virtual Page file, System Restore, Shadow Copy, etc... unlike a 3rd
    party pay for program.

    Shawn


    --
    Brink

    *There are no dumb questions, just the people that do not ask
    them.*
    '*VISTA FORUMS*' (http://www.vistax64.com)
    *Please post feedback to help others.*
     
    Brink, May 6, 2008
    #18
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