NIC Conflict (?)

Discussion in 'Server Networking' started by System Administrator, Dec 14, 2007.

  1. Windows Server 2003 R2 SP2 installed on an Intel server platform with
    two (2) network interfaces (NICs) on the motherboard. Had disabled
    NIC#2 in BIOS and using NIC#1. NIC#1 failed and is no longer
    appearing in Device Manager. I have now disabled NIC#1 and enabled
    NIC#2 in BIOS. After re-booting Windows, I configured the newly
    discovered NIC (Local Area Connection 2)(the previous connection was
    just Local Area Connection) the same as NIC#1 had been configured.
    Upon closing the applet, an error message appeared stating the
    assigned IP address was the same as a previously configured, but
    inactive, NIC and asked if I wanted to change the IP or keep it. I
    chose to keep it as many other devices on the network are configured
    to use that IP address for accessing the server. Upon doing so, the
    applet took quite a while to close and no error messages appeared in
    Event Viewer. The server now seems to be working fine again. Upon
    going back into properties of Local Area Connection 2 to change the
    DNS setting to 127.0.0.1 and closing the applet, the same error
    message was presented. This time, when answering "no" the applet
    closed much faster than the first time. My question is how can I
    delete any reference in Windows to the previously used NIC so as not
    to have Windows believe there is a conflict between the previously
    used NIC and the currently used NIC?

    Thanks.
     
    System Administrator, Dec 14, 2007
    #1
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  2. System Administrator

    ThePro Guest

    In Device manager, click on View | Show hidden devices. You should see the
    disabled NIC there and uninstall it.

    ThePro
     
    ThePro, Dec 14, 2007
    #2
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  3. Thanks for the suggestion, but the now disabled NIC does not appear in
    Device Manager, even when Show hidden devices is invoked. Any other
    suggestions? Thanks.
     
    System Administrator, Dec 14, 2007
    #3
  4. Re-enable it in Bios and try again.

    --
    Phillip Windell
    www.wandtv.com

    The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or Microsoft,
    or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
    -----------------------------------------------------
     
    Phillip Windell, Dec 14, 2007
    #4
  5. The DNS should be set to the actual IP# of the machine instead of 127.0.0.1.

    I used to do it that way too, until people kept telling me to stop doing
    that. Personally, it worked that way for me too, but there were supposed to
    be some evil things that could happen if I used 127.0.0.1.

    --
    Phillip Windell
    www.wandtv.com

    The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or Microsoft,
    or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
    -----------------------------------------------------
     
    Phillip Windell, Dec 14, 2007
    #5
  6. * Phillip Windell (Fri, 14 Dec 2007 16:27:38 -0600)
    Definitely a case for MTV's myth busters. The only problem I ever
    encountered was with DNS' WINS forward lookup.

    Thorsten
     
    Thorsten Kampe, Dec 14, 2007
    #6
  7. So, which is it? 127.0.0.1 or the actual IP address?
     
    System Administrator, Dec 14, 2007
    #7
  8. OK, I will try. But won't that definitely cause an IP conflict
    between the two NICs? Should I temporarily change the IP of NIC#2
    while doing your suggestion?
     
    System Administrator, Dec 14, 2007
    #8
  9. * System Administrator (Fri, 14 Dec 2007 15:45:15 -0800)
    As I said: both are fine and both are the "actual" IP addresses.

    Thorsten
     
    Thorsten Kampe, Dec 15, 2007
    #9
  10. I did change the IP address of the active NIC, shutdown and booted to
    BIOS. I then re-enabled the previously used NIC (keeping the
    currently used NIC enabled) and booted to Windows. I could not delete
    the previously used NIC in Device Manager as it did not appear, again.
    I guess it has failed to the point where Windows no longer detects it.
    So, I'm back to my original question.
     
    System Administrator, Dec 16, 2007
    #10
  11. The official MS postion,...use the real IP#,...not the localhost IP#.

    --
    Phillip Windell
    www.wandtv.com

    The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or Microsoft,
    or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
    -----------------------------------------------------
     
    Phillip Windell, Dec 17, 2007
    #11
  12. * Phillip Windell (Mon, 17 Dec 2007 10:40:59 -0600)
    And this is officially documented where...?

    Thorsten
     
    Thorsten Kampe, Dec 18, 2007
    #12
  13. Define what an "official document" even is for anything regaurding this
    stuff. If you look hard enough you can probably find KB articles and
    Technet articles that contradict each other on most things. I can even name
    two people that I know who work for MS that don't agree if one of thier
    products should be on a Member Server or Stand Alone server,...they both
    work there,..they are both "official".

    Sorry, nobody ever remembers every detail and every book/chapter/verse
    reference of every thing they read. A search on MS's site for DNS Settings
    on a Domain Controllers should turn it up easy enough. I'm not worried
    about it enough to mess with it, if someone doesn't want to belive me then
    they can just ignore me like most of the girls do. :)

    --
    Phillip Windell
    www.wandtv.com

    The views expressed, are my own and not those of my employer, or Microsoft,
    or anyone else associated with me, including my cats.
    -----------------------------------------------------
     
    Phillip Windell, Dec 18, 2007
    #13
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