OEM version with new m/board & processor

Discussion in 'Windows Vista General Discussion' started by Gary Mount, Feb 4, 2008.

  1. Gary Mount

    Gary Mount Guest

    If I change my mother board and processor, will I still be able to use my
    OEM version of Vista?
    The reason I ask is because I am being told in this forum/news group that

    "Updating the motherboard and processor does not constitute a "new
    computer". I can see you haven't read the EULA and are just making it up
    as you go along."

    when I say that changing the mother board and CPU is a new computer and
    would violate the OEM license.
     
    Gary Mount, Feb 4, 2008
    #1
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  2. Gary Mount

    lemorian Guest

    Microsoft does not say what part of a computer defines the computer.
    It says nothing about motherboards and cpu defining the computer.

    HOWEVER MS has given the freedom to the companies that sell computers
    to define what THEY think will be the computer. So where did you buy it
    from?

    Other than that, just activate by phone and tell them that your motherboard
    exploded and you had to replace it
    and you are not a tech so you dont know all about that stuff (play it dumb)
    I am very sure you will be able to reactivate by phone
     
    lemorian, Feb 4, 2008
    #2
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  3. Gary Mount

    Gary Mount Guest

    I have been doing some searching and found this...

    "Microsoft recently made changes to the license agreement. A new motherboard
    is now apparently the equal of a new computer, and if you upgrade it you
    need to purchase a new Windows license.

    Microsoft's new policy states:

    An upgrade of the motherboard is considered to result in a "new personal
    computer" to which Microsoft OEM operating system software cannot be
    transferred from another computer. If the motherboard is upgraded or
    replaced for reasons other than a defect, then a new computer has been
    created and the license of new operating system software is required.

    The reason Microsoft gave for this term is that Microsoft needs to have one
    base component "left standing" that would still define that original PC.
    Since the motherboard contains the CPU and is the "heart and soul" of the
    PC, when the motherboard is replaced (for reasons other than defect) a new
    PC is essentially created.

    Microsoft has sent a memo to its OEM partners asking them to enforce this
    new policy every time they upgrade a computer for a client.
    "
     
    Gary Mount, Feb 4, 2008
    #3
  4. Gary Mount

    Gary Mount Guest

    I am just researching this topic so I can properly reply to another poster
    in this forum/news group.
    I have retail versions of Vista on my desktop machines, and a laptop with an
    OEM Windows XP Home that won't be getting an O/S upgrade because the
    processor sucks (a Intel Celeron).
    So I don't have to worry about OEM license restrictions. My next motherboard
    upgrade will be when Intel releases their Nehalem architecture late this
    year.
     
    Gary Mount, Feb 4, 2008
    #4
  5. Gary Mount

    Alias Guest

    FUD from some blog. Read the EULA. Remember there are two types of OEM,
    branded (like from Dell or HP) and generic, you bought it yourself. The
    latter is what I was referring to, not the branded OEM. Branded OEM
    versions cannot be upgraded except by using hardware approved by the
    likes of Dell or HP.

    Alias
     
    Alias, Feb 4, 2008
    #5
  6. Gary Mount

    Charlie42 Guest

    <snip>

    Are there any actual Microsoft sources that confirm this information?

    Charlie42
     
    Charlie42, Feb 4, 2008
    #6
  7. Gary Mount

    Saucy Guest


    How do you define a new computer?

    Saucy
     
    Saucy, Feb 4, 2008
    #7
  8. Is your OEM copy a branded OEM copy that came preinstalled on a machine
    you purchased?

    --
    Priceless quotes in m.p.w.vista.general group -
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    "Fair use is not merely a nice concept--it is a federal law based on
    free speech rights under the First Amendment and is a cornerstone of the
    creativity and innovation that is a hallmark of this country. Consumer
    rights in the digital age are not frivolous."
    - Maura Corbett
     
    The poster formerly known as 'The Poster Formerly , Feb 4, 2008
    #8
  9. Hi Gary, do you have a link for this new policy?


    --
    Priceless quotes in m.p.w.vista.general group -
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    "Fair use is not merely a nice concept--it is a federal law based on
    free speech rights under the First Amendment and is a cornerstone of the
    creativity and innovation that is a hallmark of this country. Consumer
    rights in the digital age are not frivolous."
    - Maura Corbett
     
    The poster formerly known as 'The Poster Formerly , Feb 4, 2008
    #9

  10. I haven't seem this anywhere. If what you say is true, please post a
    link to a Microsoft page that confirms what you say.
     
    Ken Blake, MVP, Feb 4, 2008
    #10
  11. Gary Mount

    SG Guest

    Ken,

    You want see this anywhere on a public site, it is posted in the MS OEM
    forum. If you are not an OEM you can sign up through their Partner Program.

    It states the following...
     
    SG, Feb 4, 2008
    #11
  12. If the motherboard is upgraded or replaced for reasons other than a defect

    Well, heck, my motherboard was defective. It wouldn't run a pci-e
    video card! Had to junk the thing, a total loss.

    When you could get an XP license for 75 bucks I'd just donate
    the old machine to goodwill or whatever. But now that Windows costs
    300 bucks I seem to have a lot more defective parts...
     
    the wharf rat, Feb 4, 2008
    #12

  13. Then it's meaningless. The customer is bound by the EULA he gets with
    the product. What it says on some web site that he can't even get to
    is not legally binding on him.
     
    Ken Blake, MVP, Feb 4, 2008
    #13
  14. Gary;
    What type of OEM?

    Generic, typically sold with a piece of hardware such as a power cord,
    hard drive etc (but not always)?
    There should be no problem since it is an upgrade of the same
    computer.
    Telephone activation may be necessary.

    OEM such as comes from a major OEM such as Gateway, Dell, HP, Compaq
    Etc?
    Some of the major OEMs add technology that prevents installation on a
    motherboard from a different manufacturer.
    Contact the manufacturer, newsgroup or forum specific to that brand
    for specific details.
     
    Jupiter Jones [MVP], Feb 4, 2008
    #14
  15. Gary Mount

    SG Guest

    Ken,

    Not meaningless exactly. According to MS the EULA must be presented to the
    user on their first run. We all know what that means :>)
    In the past you could just click OK without reading, then someone coded the
    EULA in some apps where you had to at least scroll to the bottom before the
    OK button would become enabled., still useless IMO.

    These EULA's have been and will always be confusing to many, thus the
    discussions we have seen many times on these groups.
     
    SG, Feb 4, 2008
    #15
  16. I am aware of the stipulation by MS that the EULA must be presented to
    the user. IANAL, but common sense dictates then it would have to
    stipulate such restrictions about the hardware in the EULA that is
    presented to the user which means that there would be a hard link to the
    hardware requirement on the MS website. Otherwise it is most likely an
    unconscionable contract.

    --
    Priceless quotes in m.p.w.vista.general group -
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    "Fair use is not merely a nice concept--it is a federal law based on
    free speech rights under the First Amendment and is a cornerstone of the
    creativity and innovation that is a hallmark of this country. Consumer
    rights in the digital age are not frivolous."
    - Maura Corbett
     
    The poster formerly known as 'The Poster Formerly , Feb 4, 2008
    #16
  17. Gary Mount

    SG Guest

    No argument from me on this :>)
    It should be very clear to all and remove all the LAWYER talk so everyone
    can understand it. VBG
    If they would just use the KISS method.
     
    SG, Feb 5, 2008
    #17
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