OT: RIAA: It's 'Illegal' to Rip Your Own CDs to Your Own Computer

Discussion in 'Windows Vista General Discussion' started by jim, Jan 3, 2008.

  1. jim

    jim Guest

    (from
    http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/Entert...cording_industry_ups_ante_for_downloads/1429/)


    "Recording industry ups ante for downloads

    Published: Dec. 30, 2007 at 3:29 PM

    SCOTTSDALE, Ariz., Dec. 30 (UPI) -- The U.S. recording industry has
    intensified its fight against illicit downloading, saying it is illegal for
    someone to transfer music from a CD onto a computer.

    As part of the industry's ongoing legal effort against Jeffery Howell, a
    Scottsdale, Ariz., resident accused of sharing nearly 2,000 songs, industry
    officials said even legally owned discs should not be copied onto one's
    computer, The Washington Post reported Sunday.

    The Recording Industry Association of America's position that Howell broke
    the law when he copied a legally purchased disc to his computer was
    immediately attacked by a lawyer familiar with such charges.

    "The basic principle in the law is that you have to distribute actual
    physical copies to be guilty of violating copyright. But recently, the
    industry has been going around saying that even a personal copy on your
    computer is a violation," said Ray Beckerman, a lawyer who has represented
    several of the association's targets in the past.

    The Post said the industry's announcement comes in the wake of October's
    federal jury case in which a Minnesota woman was ordered to pay $220,000 to
    record companies for downloading 24 songs.


    © United Press International. All Rights Reserved.
    This material may not be reproduced, redistributed, or manipulated in any
    form."
     
    jim, Jan 3, 2008
    #1
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  2. jim

    Alias Guest

    Please note that this Gestapo crap only happens in the USA. In Europe,
    every time we buy a CD or DVD, we are paying an extra fee to pay
    royalties and fair use is the golden rule here.

    Alias
     
    Alias, Jan 3, 2008
    #2
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  3. jim

    Stephan Rose Guest

    On Thu, 03 Jan 2008 07:38:51 -0500, jim wrote:

    I wonder how much they like me stripping region coding and CSS encryption
    from my DVDs so that I can watch them from my Hard Drives and protect the
    physical DVDs. =)

    --
    Stephan
    2003 Yamaha R6

    å›ã®ã“ã¨æ€ã„出ã™æ—¥ãªã‚“ã¦ãªã„ã®ã¯
    å›ã®ã“ã¨å¿˜ã‚ŒãŸã¨ããŒãªã„ã‹ã‚‰
     
    Stephan Rose, Jan 3, 2008
    #3
  4. jim

    Tom Lake Guest

    Watch out or they'll put the MI5 on your trail! Just ask that guy who
    posts all over the place. 8^)

    Tom Lake
     
    Tom Lake, Jan 3, 2008
    #4
  5. jim

    Gilgamesh Guest

    <SNIP>

    I thought US copy right law had something called "Fair Use" that let you
    make backup copies of legitimatly purchased media. (Unfortunately that is
    not part of Australian copyright law :-( )
     
    Gilgamesh, Jan 3, 2008
    #5
  6. jim

    caver1 Guest


    That's why they want DRM and everything that goes
    with it. A way to get around the law.
    Saw an interview yesterday with one of the head
    people of the movie industry(can't remember his
    name). He said that fair use is no good because
    you cannot know ahead of time if the person making
    the copy is a pirate or not. So then there should
    be no legal way to make copies.
    Sounds like greed to me.
    caver1
     
    caver1, Jan 3, 2008
    #6
  7. jim

    Stephan Rose Guest

    Sounds like someone that won't be receiving any of my business to me.
    Matter of fact, it'll only make it more likely that I'd choose to buy an
    illegal copy instead. An illegal copy won't have the restrictions of a
    legal copy and would therefore likely be my preferred choice.

    Take music for instance. I have all my songs in a huge library on my hard
    drive. So if I want to listen to one particular song, I just have to type
    in it's name. If I just want to listen to any one random song of one
    artist but any album, I can do so too. If I want to listen to any random
    song of my collection, which is usually how I have my media player set
    up, I can do that as well.

    Now let's compare this with what the RIAA and other DRM advocates would
    like. They don't want me to copy the music from my CD. I can no longer do
    *ANY* of the above. I'm only able to listen to songs that are on the CD
    and nothing else.

    Listen to a random song I own? Not possible.
    Listen to a random song from any one artist (or selection of)? Not
    possible.
    Quickly find one particular song I'd like to listen to? While it may be
    physically possible to locate the CD quickly, it's still a hassle to have
    to switch physical media.

    Bottom line, I *DON'T* want that. It makes life for me as a consumer more
    difficult and reduces my ability to enjoy my content.

    Now if I buy illegal copies...

    Listen to a random song I own? Possible.
    Listen to a random song from any one artist? Possible.
    Quickly find one song? Possible.
    Do anything else I like? Possible.

    So why would anyone, in a DRM world, choose DRM content when non-DRM
    content has clear advantages when it comes to actually using the content?

    The same goes for movies. I actually have external hard drives that
    contain copies of my movies. As I use my computer with a TV attached to
    view my movies, this makes it very easy for me to watch any movie I want
    which I *legally* own.

    --
    Stephan
    2003 Yamaha R6

    å›ã®ã“ã¨æ€ã„出ã™æ—¥ãªã‚“ã¦ãªã„ã®ã¯
    å›ã®ã“ã¨å¿˜ã‚ŒãŸã¨ããŒãªã„ã‹ã‚‰
     
    Stephan Rose, Jan 3, 2008
    #7
  8. jim

    caver1 Guest

    caver1, Jan 3, 2008
    #8
  9. jim

    mikeyhsd Guest

    as had been reported elsewhere. the individual had the ripped music in a download folder for a P2P program.
    that's how they were found.

    no where near the same thing as simply copying the music to your computer.








    (from
    http://www.upi.com/NewsTrack/Entert...cording_industry_ups_ante_for_downloads/1429/)


    "Recording industry ups ante for downloads

    Published: Dec. 30, 2007 at 3:29 PM

    SCOTTSDALE, Ariz., Dec. 30 (UPI) -- The U.S. recording industry has
    intensified its fight against illicit downloading, saying it is illegal for
    someone to transfer music from a CD onto a computer.

    As part of the industry's ongoing legal effort against Jeffery Howell, a
    Scottsdale, Ariz., resident accused of sharing nearly 2,000 songs, industry
    officials said even legally owned discs should not be copied onto one's
    computer, The Washington Post reported Sunday.

    The Recording Industry Association of America's position that Howell broke
    the law when he copied a legally purchased disc to his computer was
    immediately attacked by a lawyer familiar with such charges.

    "The basic principle in the law is that you have to distribute actual
    physical copies to be guilty of violating copyright. But recently, the
    industry has been going around saying that even a personal copy on your
    computer is a violation," said Ray Beckerman, a lawyer who has represented
    several of the association's targets in the past.

    The Post said the industry's announcement comes in the wake of October's
    federal jury case in which a Minnesota woman was ordered to pay $220,000 to
    record companies for downloading 24 songs.


    © United Press International. All Rights Reserved.
    This material may not be reproduced, redistributed, or manipulated in any
    form."
     
    mikeyhsd, Jan 3, 2008
    #9
  10. jim

    bb Guest

    Yes we do, but the RIAA thinks that too should be illegal.

    They think that every copy should be separately purchased from them. Want a
    backup? - buy another copy. Want it on your IPOD? - buy another copy.
    Invite someone over to listen? - buy a "performance license".

    Sing "Happy Birthday(c)" to your family, friends and co-workers? The RIAA
    wants to hit you will a copyright lawsuit.

    CNET did a example in this video podcast:
    http://reviews.cnet.com/Buzz_Report_RIAA_thugs_on_your_right/4660-12578_7-6785792.html?tag=vid
     
    bb, Jan 3, 2008
    #10
  11. jim

    Mark Kent Guest

    If its based on England and Wales law, then you will have something
    called the "fair deal".
     
    Mark Kent, Jan 3, 2008
    #11
  12. jim

    HeyBub Guest

    Contracts trump "fair use." If you agree (EULA) to not copy the CD, then
    "fair use" flys out the window. But wait, it's worse.

    If a company includes some sort of control over the product, and you
    circumvent that control, you're guilty of violating the DMCA (Digital
    Millenium Copyright Act). Lexmark put a chip in its toner cartridges which
    prevented their being refilled (the printer interrogated the chip). A toner
    re-fill company (Static Control) reverse-engineered the chip and Lexmark
    sued under the DMCA. Lexmark ultimately lost the case and all the appeals,
    but it didn't stop them from trying.

    My view is that if you want to listen to music on your computer, iPod,
    cell-phone, or audio system without bothering the rights of anyone else,
    then WRITE AND RECORD YOUR OWN TUNES!

    Or, do what I do. When contacted by one of those prissy outfits that wanted
    me to pay $35/year for our "music on hold" stuff, I put her on hold for
    about a minute, then asked: "Do you recognize that music?"

    "No," she replied.

    "It's Mozart. Being played by the Soviet National Symphony, a country that
    no longer exists. Now answer me this: Just who the **** would you be paying
    royalties TO?"

    "Never mind," she said.
     
    HeyBub, Jan 3, 2008
    #12
  13. jim

    Beamguy Guest

    This appears to be a new policy of the RIAA - and they have not yet had time to update their website. They go into more detail
    elsewhere, but here it is from straight from their webpages...

    http://www.riaa.com/faq.php

    11. How is downloading music different from copying a personal CD?

    Record companies have never objected to someone making a copy of a CD for their own personal use. We want fans to enjoy the music
    they bought legally. But both copying CDs to give to friends and downloading music illegally rob the people who created that music
    of compensation for their work. When record companies are deprived of critical revenue, they are forced to lay off employees, drop
    artists from their rosters, and sign fewer bands. That's bad news for the music industry, but ultimately bad news for fans as well.
    We all benefit from a vibrant music industry committed to nurturing the next generation of talent.
     
    Beamguy, Jan 3, 2008
    #13
  14. jim

    Tim Slattery Guest

    It does. The RIAA and MPAA wish it would go away, and tend to act like
    it doesn't exist. Electronic books restrict that right too, as well as
    the "right of first sale". That's a BIG reason I don't like eBooks.
    Bummer!
     
    Tim Slattery, Jan 3, 2008
    #14
  15. jim

    roy69 Guest

    I thought it was the same in the Uk. If you buy a CD, ripping it to your
    own PC to keep it in your library was legal.


    --
    roy69

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    roy69, Jan 3, 2008
    #15
  16. jim

    Stephan Rose Guest

    Well I'm not a musician and I don't think my voice matches that of
    Hamasaki Ayumi =P

    That said...the RIAA can just suck my balls. Luckily, I don't listen to
    any of the crap the RIAA puts out in the first place.

    Precious, absolutely precious. I love it!

    --
    Stephan
    2003 Yamaha R6

    å›ã®ã“ã¨æ€ã„出ã™æ—¥ãªã‚“ã¦ãªã„ã®ã¯
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    Stephan Rose, Jan 3, 2008
    #16
  17. jim

    nessuno Guest

    Yes, but I thought I had read somewhere that region coding is illegal
    in Australia (that is, the dvd readers sold there play anything,
    regardless of region).
     
    nessuno, Jan 3, 2008
    #17
  18. jim

    caver1 Guest


    MS sympathizers try to place all the blame on the
    movie and recording industry. But what they don't
    want to realize is that the movie and recording
    industry is taking their business plan directly
    from MS. You own nothing. Everything by license or
    subscription. Always paying.
    This is why most intelligent people are fighting them.
    I agree with copywrite protection but there must
    be limits.
    caver1
     
    caver1, Jan 3, 2008
    #18
  19. jim

    caver1 Guest


    Agreed. But at the same time the RIAA (makes me
    think of rabies) also states that any copies are
    illegal no matter what the purpose. They won't
    fight that view in court because they know they
    will lose.
    At the same time someone owns a gun. Most crimes
    committed with a gun use illegal guns. So all guns
    should be illegal and everyone that owns one has
    committed a crime. No proof of crime needs to be
    brought forth.
    No I don't own a gun.
    That is what the basis of our laws are based on.
    You must prove that the person committed the crime
    not that he/she is capable. If the latter was true
    there would be no one outside of prisons.
    If the Gov't by law cannot use the law to that
    effect why should a business?
    caver1
     
    caver1, Jan 3, 2008
    #19
  20. jim

    HeyBub Guest

    Uh, the "Gestapo" was a European thing.

    The US operates under the rule of contract: that is, a willing buyer and a
    willing seller agreeing to terms of a transaction. We take a dim view of
    thieves.

    Often we shoot them. Sometimes we shoot a pre-thief.
     
    HeyBub, Jan 3, 2008
    #20
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