OVERLY LONG FILE NAMES - as impediment to COPYING FILES

Discussion in 'Windows 64 Bit' started by EverymanEndUser, Aug 16, 2005.

  1. I tend to use long file names, so as to identify needed files readily.

    If the file saves to my C drive in Windows XP Professional,
    I don't pay particular attention to the length of the file name
    that I've used.

    But in trying to COPY large files (e.g., a folder holding tens
    of thousands of sub-folders, with 2GB of saved data), most
    copying programs that I've encountered -- on 250 GB Maxtor
    external hard drives, on 40 GB HP external hard drives,
    on 2 GB Lexar flash drives -- not only will NOT COPY
    a file with an overly-long file name, but they also TERMINATE
    THE ENTIRE COPYING PROCESS INSTANTLY, merely on
    hitting a single too-long file name.

    Going into huge saved data files MANUALLY and MANUALLY
    reducing the length of each long file name is impossible.

    That's why we have COMPUTERS AND PROGRAMS:
    to automate important but tedious tasks and processes.

    I am hoping that someone somewhere has
    AN AUTOMATIC FILENAME-LENGTH TRUNCATION PROGRAM,
    or subroutine -- that could be run through my entire C drive
    prior to attempting to copy large files, or, even better,
    that could be run ON-THE-FLY in conjunction with any
    file-copying process, and that could truncate overly-long
    file names on-the-fly, as they are encountered, to permit the
    standard file-copying routines or algorithms to proceed
    without stopping, and even without losing those particular files
    with overlong names.

    IS THERE SUCH A FILENAME-LENGTH TRUNCATION PROGRAM?

    If so, how can I get an operational version, both for XP Professional
    and for XP Media Center?

    I'd have thought that this sub-routine would have been the most
    obvious thing in the world for MICROSOFT itself to have
    incorporated into Windows.

    But if it's available in Windows XP Professional or in XP Media Center,
    I'm not aware of it.
     
    EverymanEndUser, Aug 16, 2005
    #1
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  2. I don't really know what this has to do with 64bit Windows. I suspect you
    meant to post this somewhere else.

    There are lots of ways to automatically truncate names. And I'm not at all
    sure what you consider overly long. Certainly I've used plain old xcopy for
    file names up to 64 characters long. And if used with the /N switch, will
    automatically generate short names. Very short, in this case.
     
    Charlie Russel - MVP, Aug 16, 2005
    #2
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  3. EverymanEndUser

    Randy Guest

    It means he probably didn't read his operating system manual, and has
    run into trouble over it because of downloading billions of bits of copy-
    righted multimedia files to his system, on which they are all now basically
    quarantined.

    Karma strikes again... ;~)

    But seriously, many backup programs will include some sort of long file name
    translator which should help him out. Briefcase transfers might also be a
    solution (http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;307885)

    blah...
     
    Randy, Aug 17, 2005
    #3
  4. EverymanEndUser

    Joe Guest

    Try using UNC names, there is supposed to be a much larger limit on the
    entire pathname.

    For example, instead of:

    xcopy /s D:\folder E:\backup\20050817\folder

    use:

    C:> hostname
    ... displays the network name of your machine ...
    ... use this name in the place of "machinename" on the next line
    C:> xcopy /s \\machinename\D$\folder
    \\hostname\E$\backup\20050817\folder

    There are caveats on this. Search MSDN for "Path Lengths" - it is in
    Windows Base Services: Platform SDK.
     
    Joe, Aug 18, 2005
    #4
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