Pagefile size for 64-bit Windows 2003 Server

Discussion in 'Windows 64 Bit' started by Sabo, Eric, Aug 21, 2007.

  1. Sabo, Eric

    Sabo, Eric Guest

    I already checked out KB889654.



    I really have no clue what I should make the minimum and maximum pagefile
    size on a 64-bit server that has 32 GB of physical memory in the server.
    Should I make the minimum 8 GB and the maximum 34 GB.



    Any help would be appreciated.
     
    Sabo, Eric, Aug 21, 2007
    #1
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  2. Sabo, Eric

    Theo Guest

    I think Microsoft's guidance is:

    "There is no specific recommendation for page file size.
    Your requirements will be based on the hardware and software
    that you use and the load that you put on the computer. To
    monitor page file usage and requirements, run System
    Monitor, and gather a log during typical usage conditions.
    Focus on the following counters."

    To me the key is to monitor your system and base your
    decision on your system's workload. Maybe it will make more
    sense if you read thru the KB again.
     
    Theo, Aug 21, 2007
    #2
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  3. I couldn't say what size a server would require, you could try the Divide &
    Rule principle - set the maximum size for a while, then halv it for a while,
    then go half-way between the upper and the lower remains and you should
    quickly find something that works well, finally up this figure some 10 - 20
    % - but I'd suggest you do not use the min-max values, set both to the same
    value and you'll prevent the system from ever having to re-size the file. (A
    leeeengthy operation that could bog down your machine for longer than I
    imagine you would dream it would?)

    MS suggest 1,5 x size of installed RAM, but I doubt that all data that flows
    through your memory would fit as 'pageable' data. More important, probably
    is that you put it on the fastest drive you can lay your hands on


    Tony. . .
     
    Tony Sperling, Aug 21, 2007
    #3
  4. Sabo, Eric

    Theo Guest

    The 1.5 is pretty much for desktop computers. The TB he
    refers to suggests monitoring the workload and then has a
    table to help calculate the desired page file for a server.
     
    Theo, Aug 21, 2007
    #4
  5. Sabo, Eric

    Sabo, Eric Guest

    If I have 32 GB Physical memory, the server might never hit the pagefile
    that much.

    I am totally lost on this, never had a server with this much physical
    memory.
     
    Sabo, Eric, Aug 22, 2007
    #5
  6. If you are running a Server OS, I assume you have tools to set up monitoring
    as Theo suggests. Beyond this, isn't the OS setting a default size? That
    would usually not be far off the mark, I would certainly take that as a good
    place to start. You wouldn't risk much by setting experimental values, go
    beyond/below your needs and the performance should suffer, but depending on
    your useage and the amount of data, you might need to tweak the default
    substantially. With a server, I don't think you will get any
    recommendations - it would be dependent on the workload.

    In a situation when you cannot tell if your performance is good or bad, it's
    probably close to O.K. and finding the optimal size might not show as any
    significant performance boost - tweaking is for when you know you are
    unhappy and something probably is wrong.

    Anytime when we are unsure, it is vastly more important to get it up and
    running, any troubles are certain to surface sooner or later.


    Tony. . .
     
    Tony Sperling, Aug 22, 2007
    #6
  7. Yes, I agree. Monitoring must be the way to go if you have too know. The
    Resource Kit is geared to do this, but it isn't 64bit so you would have to
    rely on the OS standard utilities. With a Server OS - I only assume it can
    be done regardless?

    I was working with a guy once - his standard reply to customers was: "If you
    have to ask, you don't want to know!"

    I always silently thought it was alright to tell them to experiment and find
    out them selves. At least when dealing with harmless trivia.


    Tony. . .
     
    Tony Sperling, Aug 22, 2007
    #7
  8. Sabo, Eric

    Theo Guest

    I think the KB is a pretty good guide on how to calculate
    your page file. Try running the System Monitor as the
    article suggests.

    Extract from the KB889654:

    "How to calculate page file size
    Use one or more of the following methods to help you
    calculate page file size.
    Method 1: Use performance logs to understand the paging
    activity on your computer
    1. Click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then
    click Performance.
    2. Expand Performance Logs and Alerts, click Counter Logs,
    right-click the blank space in the right-pane, and then
    click New Log Settings.
    3. In the Name box, type a name for the log, and then click OK.
    4. On the General tab, click Add Counters.
    5. Click Use local computer counters.
    6. In the Performance object list, click Paging File.
    7. Click Select counters from list, click % Usage, and then
    click Add.
    8. In the Performance object list, click Memory.
    9. In Select counters from list, click Available Bytes, and
    then click Add.
    10. In Select counters from list, click Pages Input/sec,
    click Add, and then click Close.
    11. Click OK.
    Use the log that you collect during typical computer use to
    understand the paging activity on your computer. Then,
    adjust the page file size accordingly.


    Method 2: Use the Page File Bytes Peak counter to calculate
    page file size
    1. Click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then
    click Performance.
    2. Click System Monitor.
    3. In the right pane, click + (the Add button).
    4. Click Use local computer counters.
    5. In the Performance object list, click Process.
    6. Click Select counters from list, click Page File Bytes
    Peak, click Add, and then click Close.
    7. Let the counter run during typical use of your computer.
    8. Note the maximum value for the Page File Bytes Peak
    counter, and then multiply the value by 70. The sum of the
    equation is the size to set for your page file.

    Method 3: Calculate the minimum and maximum page file size
    To determine the approximate minimum page file that is
    required by your system, calculate the sum of peak private
    bytes that are used by each process on the system. Then,
    subtract the amount of memory on the system.

    To determine the approximate maximum page file space that is
    required for your system, calculate the sum of peak private
    bytes that are used by each process on the system. Then, add
    a margin of additional space. Do not subtract the amount of
    memory on the system. The size of the additional margin can
    be adjusted based on your confidence in the snapshot data
    that is used to estimate page file requirements.

    Note This estimate is accurate only if the snapshot of data
    that is used to make the calculations is accurate."
     
    Theo, Aug 22, 2007
    #8
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