Permissions

Discussion in 'Windows Vista Security' started by Johnny Fosse, Jan 29, 2009.

  1. Johnny Fosse

    Mike Torello Guest

    No. MS is trying to protect the user from him(her)self.

    I don't need a nanny.
     
    Mike Torello, Jan 30, 2009
    #21
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  2. Johnny Fosse

    Kathy Guest

    No I am NOT BLONDE and I take great offence to that comment. I have 2 very
    smart blonde daughters. Can you tell me whyy I have directories that don't
    exist and folder I can't access? If I want to access a folder on computer
    why can't I? All I want to know is a way to access my computer???? Why do
    you guys have a problem with that? Why do any of the folders have to be
    hard to access? If I choose to access something and mess up my computer,
    why can't I?

    Kathy
     
    Kathy, Jan 30, 2009
    #22
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  3. Johnny Fosse

    Kathy Guest

    THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!!!!!!
    Like you said I want to access everything. It is my computer and I don't
    want anyone telling me I can't access things. I too have been able to
    access some things and don't know I did it.

    Once again thanks

    Kathy
     
    Kathy, Jan 30, 2009
    #23
  4. Johnny Fosse

    Gordon Guest

    Because, if you bother to listen, they are NOT FOLDERS. They are JUNCTION
    POINTS.

    read this:

    Windows Vista Junction Points:

    http://www.svrops.com/svrops/articles/jpoints.htm
     
    Gordon, Jan 30, 2009
    #24
  5. :eek:D

     
    FromTheRafters, Jan 31, 2009
    #25
  6. Johnny Fosse

    Dave Guest

    Standard reply I've been posting for the past 2 years....

    Vista uses a different file structure than XP does/did. Those familiar
    folder names you may be used to, like "My Documents", "Documents &
    Settings", etc.
    are not folders in Vista. They are junction points, and are used for legacy
    programs which were written to utilize the XP file structure. They will
    redirect the programs to use the equivalent Vista folders.
    If you keep the protected operating system files hidden, you won't see them.

    XP -> Vista......
    Documents & Settings -> \Users
    My Documents -> \Users\youraccount\Documents
    My Music -> \Users\youraccount\Music
    Application Data -> \Users\youraccount\AppData
    etc.
     
    Dave, Jan 31, 2009
    #26
  7. She's not even as smart as the proverbial blonde!
    You speak in generalities ("things", "something") and want specifics
    for answers. When you get the specifics (the explanation of junction
    points) you apparently don't read them.

    That's just plain dumb.
     
    Randall Flagg, Jan 31, 2009
    #27
  8. I had a directory (folder) named under DOS that Win98 had a problem with.
    The folder icon appeared in the file browser window named with an
    underscore.
    When double-clicked I got a message box stating 'this folder does not exist'
    or
    some such...yes, computers can be aggravating. Why show me the icon if the
    folder does not exist (and yet it does - I created it).

    XP had a great out of the box experience, but needed to be 'hardened' for
    better security. Vista's OOBE is a sharp contrast, but can be 'softened' to
    be more like XP.

    If I understand it correctly, Windows 7 puts that softening on a GUI
    slider. Vista's methods can be easily googled for.

    Disabling UAC

    Activating the real administrator in Vista
     
    FromTheRafters, Jan 31, 2009
    #28
  9. Johnny Fosse

    Kathy Guest

    OK, so they ARE NOT FOLDERS, they are JUNCTIONPOINTS. I could care a less
    what they are called, if they are visable on my computer why can't I access
    them?
    You know people learn a lot better when teachers are not rude. I came on
    here to learn something not be put down.
     
    Kathy, Jan 31, 2009
    #29
  10. Johnny Fosse

    Gordon Guest

    Umm because there is nothing in them. When you are driving, you don't access
    a sign-post, do you? There's nothing in it. It POINTS to where you want to
    go. Same with Junction points.
    To further your analogy, there are THOUSANDS of dll files on your machine.
    Do you want to access those? Would you even understand what they do? Yes you
    could mess with them, and then we'd just get lots of hassle trying to right
    the wrongs you have done to your machine.
    Just accept the fact that there are inaccessible files and folders on your
    machine. Yes, find out what they do, knowledge is good, but leave them
    alone!
     
    Gordon, Jan 31, 2009
    #30
  11. Johnny Fosse

    SuperXero Guest

    The real administrator account doesn't get told no
     
    SuperXero, Jan 31, 2009
    #31
  12. Johnny Fosse

    Guest Guest

    OK, I've found why we're having such a polarized discussion.
    I DON'T USE WINDOWS EXPLORER. Somewhere around windows 95, it became
    more hindrance than help. As a general rule, never use ANY windows
    built-in function if a third-party tool exists. You'll have lower
    blood pressure and fewer fits of anger.

    I use totalcommander for my file browser.
    Somehow, totalcommander has managed to provide a stable, consistent
    user interface that incorporates most of the functions I ever need since
    windows 3.1. And it doesn't break or change every time M$ has a brain
    fart. It just keeps on working perfectly. I click the same menu item
    I clicked 10 years ago and it still does the same thing.

    When I click on documents and settings in windows explorer, I get
    "access denied".
    When I click on documents and settings in totalcommander, I get taken
    to the place the junction point pointed to (c:\users)...as it should.
    I never noticed because it's completely transparent...as it should be.

    My left mouse button is a legacy device attempting to access the legacy
    folder and per your explanation, should behave as if it were working.
    Windows explorer fails this test.

    By screwing around with ownerships and permissions in a manner I couldn't
    reproduce, I managed to make it work in totalcommander.
    Never bothered to try it in windows explorer before.

    For the most part, clicking on an icon does pretty much what I expect.
    I just wish I could document exactly what I did to coerce Vista into
    behaving that way. I expect that my system is much more vulnerable
    to attack than it would be if I knew what I was doing.

    In general, if I want something, I'll ask for it. If I didn't ask for
    it, don't do it.
    Vista FAILS that test.
    Vista's stock answer to any attempt is "NO!". You gotta
    go find a workaround to get anything done. And, more seriously,
    it does all manner of
    stuff you DON'T want done. More workarounds...GRRRRR!!!!
     
    Guest, Feb 1, 2009
    #32
  13. Johnny Fosse

    DDW Guest

    Like, everyone was supposed to guess that, hmm?

    I think I know where you belong, so in there you go...

    DDW
     
    DDW, Feb 1, 2009
    #33
  14. Johnny Fosse

    Sam Hobbs Guest

    You would have gotten better responses if you had first tried to understand
    why things are the way they are. I agree that there is room for improvement.
    I think there is no reason whatsoever to show "My Documents" in the user
    directory since the user directory itself is not real (it is a subdirectory
    of "Users"). You would have gotten a better response if you had asked why
    you can't access "My Documents" instead of assuming you must.

    I have seen thousands of questions; literally thousands in programming
    forums. Developers often ask questions without reading documentation and
    without searching for previous answers. People that volunteer to help others
    get frustrated with people that spend a minute or two asking a question yet
    expect (at least hope for) useful answers that often require more than a few
    minutes of time. People asking questions often don't understand why we are
    so frustrated.

    You got many responses asking that you be more specific. I can understand
    you don't understand the frustration of seeing so many questions saying
    things like "doesn't work" without specifics.

    The most important ingredient of a good question is research. If you try to
    find answers yourself first then you are more likely to get help. It also
    helps to understand that people are volunteering their time to help.
     
    Sam Hobbs, Feb 1, 2009
    #34
  15. Johnny Fosse

    Sam Hobbs Guest

    There it is. You are asking for help so you can mess up your computer, which
    means it is likely you will be back asking for more help fixing something
    and you won't understand how you messed it up and you will provide
    insufficient information. You will waste a lot of time; yours and those of
    others trying to help.

    I think most or all people that help others here will prefer that you don't
    ask for help here when in the future you mess up your computer in a manner
    you don't understand and you are doing something Windows is trying to
    protect you from messing up.
     
    Sam Hobbs, Feb 1, 2009
    #35
  16. Johnny Fosse

    Kathy Guest

    If I mess up my computer I will fix it or format it and start over.
    I get the feeling noone gets my point. I know they are junction points, but
    why show them if you can't access them?
    I want to know what is on my computer. On my computer they look like an
    ordinary folder. If you look back at the first response, won't you
    immediately feel put down and defensive? My default user folder is not
    empty. I could not access it until I changed the security options. So are
    the rest empty?

    Kathy
     
    Kathy, Feb 1, 2009
    #36
  17. Johnny Fosse

    Gordon Guest

    Why would you WANT to access your "default folder"
    I suggest you do a course in computing.

    PLONK!!!
     
    Gordon, Feb 1, 2009
    #37
  18. Johnny Fosse

    SuperXero Guest

    If you have read permissions on a folder then you can open it. If yo
    don't well then your not an administrator and the administrator has no
    assigned you read permissions. How hard is that to understand

    A regular user cannot open other users folders by default as they ar
    protected by permissions.

    SuperXer
    HackingManual.Ne
     
    SuperXero, Feb 1, 2009
    #38
  19. I know for sure that something is empty... I think it's your head.
     
    Addison Steele, Feb 1, 2009
    #39
  20. Not completely true, even the administrator can be denied access
    to some things.
    Is it too hard to read where the OP mentioned she *is* running as
    admin (albeit, protected admin). If you are going to be arrogant, at
    least be correct.
    ....and MIC.
     
    FromTheRafters, Feb 1, 2009
    #40
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