Readyboost and IDE CompactFlash

Discussion in 'Windows Vista Performance' started by Mark Gillespie, Dec 11, 2006.

  1. I have a 1GB Compact Flash card, and a IDE Internal CF adapter, however I
    can't get this running with ReadyBoost. Should I be able to?

    Thanks
     
    Mark Gillespie, Dec 11, 2006
    #1
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  2. Richard G. Harper, Dec 11, 2006
    #2
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  3. But I can use the same CF flash card via USB? Shurely this is wrong? IDE
    is lower latency..
     
    Mark Gillespie, Dec 11, 2006
    #3
  4. I doubt it's "wrong" - why would you want to use an IDE device for
    ReadyBoost when in theory it would/could be used as a direct IDE device? I
    suspect this is simply a teeny-tiny niche product that no one anticipated
    and therefore did not support.

    --
    Richard G. Harper [MVP Shell/User]
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    Richard G. Harper, Dec 12, 2006
    #4
  5. I want a permenent Readyboost, internal in my PC, not an Ugly USB Pen
    Drive hanging out the front, that's not a very niche chain of thought....
     
    Mark Gillespie, Dec 12, 2006
    #5
  6. Richard G. Harper, Dec 12, 2006
    #6
  7. Mark Gillespie

    Tom Lake Guest

    I want a permenent Readyboost, internal in my PC, not an Ugly USB Pen

    Look at an IDE card that provides USB ports. I have one that has a
    USB socket on the inside as well as four externally available ones.
    You could keep a pen drive plugged in there inside your computer.

    Tom Lake
     
    Tom Lake, Dec 12, 2006
    #7
  8. Mark Gillespie

    Robert Moir Guest

    No, and you don't really need or want to.

    Think about what readyboost actually does:
    (http://blogs.msdn.com/tomarcher/archive/2006/06/02/615199.aspx)

    It creates a 'cache' of your virtual memory onto a usb key because the
    access time is faster than that of a typical hard drive where you'd normally
    find virtual memory.

    If you have a device that connects natively via an IDE interface but works
    at fast flash memory speed, caching virtual memory file from your hard disk
    offers you nothing that cannot be served at least as well, if not better, by
    simply creating the virtual memory swap file onto your flash memory IDE
    device.

    Rob Moir
     
    Robert Moir, Dec 12, 2006
    #8
  9. Mark Gillespie

    hdc4 Guest

    I've been able to use SD flash memory cards for ready bost on my laptop's
    internal card reader. I just leave the card in all the time (just make sure
    your card is one of the newer ones with a fast read/write time). Much cheaper
    than upgrading the ram (but not necessarily as good)

    also, leaving a jump-drive sticking out the side of the laptop for this IS a
    huge annoyance-
     
    hdc4, Dec 16, 2006
    #9
  10. Mark Gillespie

    Matt S. Guest

    There will be such a device.. When Hybrid HDD's come on to the market(dont
    know for sure they have already or not) it will have a certain amount of
    flash memory inside the HD that will beable to serve as permanent
    readyboost. But, unfortunately it will only be permanent as long as you dont
    lose power..
     
    Matt S., Dec 21, 2006
    #10
  11. Mark Gillespie

    wayoung56 Guest

    I recently purchased a Toshiba Laptop with Windows Vista Home Premium. I
    noticed the ReadyBoost capability the first time I inserted a Sandisk 2GB USB
    Drive, so I started investigating. After reading several "Googled" pages on
    the web, I decided that a CompactFlash Card in a PCMCIA adaptor would be an
    ideal situation, much better than leaving a USB drive sticking out the side
    or back of the laptop.

    I had an existing 512MB CF card in a PCMCIA adaptor, and it didn't work. I
    guessed it wasn't fast or large enough to pass the ReadyBoost test. so I
    broke down and bought a faster Sandisk 2GB Ultra II CF card. And it didn't
    work either - lol. The strange thing is, it works fine if you stick it in an
    external USB 2.0 based card reader. When I stick it back in the internal
    adaptor, it is not recognized as being ReadyBoost capable again.

    Is this works as designed or something Microsoft needs to address in the
    future?
     
    wayoung56, Feb 14, 2007
    #11
  12. Mark Gillespie

    AJR Guest

    What does Event Viewer document? Go Admin tools>Event viewer>Adm and
    Services>Microsoft>Windows>Readyboost>Operational

    Could be that the USB 2.0 bus is faster than the built-in slot.
     
    AJR, Feb 14, 2007
    #12
  13. Mark Gillespie

    wayoung56 Guest

    Here's what the log entry reads after I insert the CF card in the adaptor:

    The device (Unknown Unknown) will not be used for a ReadyBoost cache because
    it is not attached to a supported interface.

    When I insert the same CD card in an external USB Card Reader, the log entry
    reads:

    The device (Generic STORAGE DEVICE) is suitable for a ReadyBoost cache. The
    recommended cache size is 1890304KB. The random read speed is 3012 KB/sec.
    The sequential write speed is 2509 KB/sec.

    and the next log entry reads:

    A ReadyBoost cache was successfully created on the device (Generic STORAGE
    DEVICE) of size 1840 MB.

    Does this mean we need to ask Microsoft to build support into the Operating
    System for devices attached to the PCMCIA bus in addition to the USB bus?

    Thanks for the information!!!
     
    wayoung56, Feb 14, 2007
    #13
  14. Mark Gillespie

    AJR Guest

    You got it! Some interesting facts - Vista creates a "ReadyBoost cache"
    whether or not a ReadyBoost device is attached - evidently this cache
    permits removal of the device without loss of data -data is duplicated
    (performance?) - data moved to the ReadyBoost device is encrypted in case
    data is left on the device when removed.
    Also confusion exists about ReadyBoost. At times there will be posts
    regarding notice that after "activating" ReadyBoost there is no increase of
    RAM indicated. ReadyBoost does not boost or increase RAM - it is an external
    memory device that increases (boosts) the "prefetch function" (Vista
    Superfetch) of the swap file.

    \

    @
     
    AJR, Feb 15, 2007
    #14
  15. Mark Gillespie

    Kevin Young Guest

    My understanding is that the PCMCIA interface is to slow to allow for
    ReadyBoost compatibility. The Expresscard interface has been added to
    many recent laptops and is much faster. I wasn't even aware that my
    laptop had an Expresscard port until a week ago because from the outside
    it look just like two PCMCIA slots. I was planning to go the same route
    as you and read elsewhere that PCMCIA would not work which led me to
    Expresscard and then to realising I had one built-in.

    -----Original Message-----
    From: wayoung56 [mailto:]
    Posted At: February-14-07 2:53 PM
    Posted To: microsoft.public.windows.vista.performance_maintenance
    Conversation: Readyboost and IDE CompactFlash
    Subject: Re: Readyboost and IDE CompactFlash

    Here's what the log entry reads after I insert the CF card in the adaptor:

    The device (Unknown Unknown) will not be used for a ReadyBoost cache
    because
    it is not attached to a supported interface.

    When I insert the same CD card in an external USB Card Reader, the log
    entry
    reads:

    The device (Generic STORAGE DEVICE) is suitable for a ReadyBoost cache.
    The
    recommended cache size is 1890304KB. The random read speed is 3012
    KB/sec.
    The sequential write speed is 2509 KB/sec.

    and the next log entry reads:

    A ReadyBoost cache was successfully created on the device (Generic STORAGE
    DEVICE) of size 1840 MB.

    Does this mean we need to ask Microsoft to build support into the
    Operating
    System for devices attached to the PCMCIA bus in addition to the USB bus?

    Thanks for the information!!!
     
    Kevin Young, Feb 15, 2007
    #15
  16. On Wed, 14 Feb 2007 12:15:30 -0800, wayoung56
    Perhaps the PCMCIA bus is too slow? Let's search that... no that
    should be OK, as worst-case data rate appears to be around 4Ms,
    whereas flash drives are typically under 1Ms.

    There may be other reasons why PCMCIA isn't an acceptable interface to
    SD cards or USB flash drives; other latencies, related overheads, or
    just that it's a dying standard that isn't worth developing a new
    feature to use. I'd use the card reader, and move on; if buying a new
    laptop, I'd want one with a native SD card slot (as is common now)


    Saws are too hard to use.
    Be easier to use!
     
    cquirke (MVP Windows shell/user), Feb 17, 2007
    #16
  17. Mark Gillespie

    NormD Guest

    I had the same thought. Supported memory need not be a USB "pen." In a new
    machine I installed a USB-based card reader and stuck in a fast (150x) 4 GB
    SD memory card. If you really want to hide it, put the USB port inside the
    case and plug in the memory and leave it!
     
    NormD, Feb 20, 2007
    #17
  18. Mark Gillespie

    n4wi Guest

    Why should it hang out the front? Why not the back, if you don't have a USB
    on the back get a 2 port USB Bracket and up plug one or two of the front ones
    and put it in the back. I have a 4 Ghz in the back and it works great and you
    don't see it from the front.
    Fred
     
    n4wi, Jul 11, 2007
    #18
  19. Mark Gillespie

    RedSpy Guest

    I too am looking at the following scenarios:
    -Buy a 8 GB 266x Compact Flash with and IDE adapter for use with ReadyBoost
    on my PC
    --This is $155 total.
    -Buy a high speed ExpressCard SSD drive for my laptop’s use

    I think it is a very reasonable request for ReadyBoost to work on this
    hardware configuration if ReadyBoost is considered a hard drive cache
    mechanism. Surely there is some way to force Vista to use these devices.
     
    RedSpy, Aug 6, 2007
    #19
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