Readyboost confusion

Discussion in 'Windows Vista Performance' started by Mark Linehan, May 26, 2007.

  1. Mark Linehan

    Mark Linehan Guest

    I would like to use readyboost on my system, but am wasting money left and
    right (LOL). I bought a thumbdrive, but it was too small and too slow. So I
    bought an Emprex 4GB USB 2.0 and it says it is high speed, but when I try to
    go into readyboost for it, it tells me "this device does not have the
    required performance characteristics for use in speeding up your system."

    I reformatted it for NTFS and it still does not work. Can anyone tell me
    exactly what I need for a readyboost flashdrive?? Is there some way I can
    get this 4GB to work? it says it is high speed. Any information is
    appreciated, thanks.


    --
    Mark Linehan
    http://www.markonline.info
    <a href="http://www.joost.com/" title="Joost&trade;"><img
    src="http://banners.joost.com/joost_002_en_120x60.jpg"
    alt="Joost&trade;"/></a>
     
    Mark Linehan, May 26, 2007
    #1
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  2. Mark Linehan

    Robert Moir Guest

    You DON'T need to format it to NTFS
    It DOES need to be plugged directly into the computer via a USB 2.0 port,
    and not via a hub.
    It DOESN'T have to have "High Speed" written on it (but it does actually
    have to perform fairly well).
    It DOES have to pass a few tests Windows performs to check if the drive and
    the port it is plugged into are fast enough.

    Are you using up-to-date USB controller drivers? And are the USB ports USB
    2.0?
     
    Robert Moir, May 26, 2007
    #2
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  3. "To use Windows ReadyBoost, PCs must be preinstalled with Windows
    Vista^(TM) and have access to a non-volatile flash memory buffer with at
    least 1GB of storage capacity. The flash memory buffer must also meet
    the requirements for random reads and random writes specified in the
    Windows Vista Logo "Storage-0009 WLP" specification:
    .. 5 MB/sec throughput for random 4k reads across the entire device
    .. 3 MB/sec throughput for random 512k writes across the entire device"

    "Q. What does it mean to be "Enhanced for Windows ReadyBoost^(TM)?
    A. The phrase "Enhanced for Windows ReadyBoost" will be used to market
    flash devices that are large enough and fast enough to consistently work
    with Windows ReadyBoost. A drive that is Enhanced for Windows
    ReadyBoost must be at least 512MB and must have random read and random
    write speeds of 5MB/sec and 3MB/sec, respectively."


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    Bruce Chambers

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    Bruce Chambers, May 26, 2007
    #3
  4. Mark Linehan

    Peter Guest

    The first USB flash drive that I've seen that actually is "Vista Compatible"
    and comes in 4gb or 8gb is the Sandisk Cruzer Contour being released this
    month.

    --
    Peter
    Toronto, Canada
    XP Pro SP2 x 2 + Vista Ultimate Triple Boot
    P4 HT @ 3ghz, 4gb DDR, 700gb HDD
    Soundblaster Audigy 4 PCI Sound
    ATI Radeon X1650 Pro AGP Graphics
     
    Peter, May 26, 2007
    #4
  5. Mark Linehan

    Mark Linehan Guest

    Okay I got this thing working tonight trying several different things. Which
    is it that you think made it start working??

    1. I turned on drive compression
    2. I turned indexing on for the drive
    3. I plugged it into a different USB port

    Could I have a mix of USB 1.0 and 2.0 ports?? They all look the same. I mean
    it doesn't matter much now because it is working with readyboost, but after
    scratching my head so long I am curious.
     
    Mark Linehan, May 27, 2007
    #5
  6. Mark Linehan

    Hertz_Donut Guest

    You bought a no-name, bargain basement thumb drive. The manufacturer can
    put any claim on speed he wants, as there are no clear
    guidelines as to what a "high speed" thumb drive is.

    Most reputable manufacturers, such as Sandisk, will label their thumbdrives
    as "ReadyBoost Compatible". As with any hardware,
    you get what you pay for. You opted for a cheap thumb drive that "appeared"
    to be a good deal...but you should do your homework
    before spending your money.

    Honu
     
    Hertz_Donut, May 27, 2007
    #6
  7. Steve Saunders, May 27, 2007
    #7
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