Registry Search Tool... Cleaning Up Vista Registry...

Discussion in 'Windows Vista General Discussion' started by Susan, Jan 11, 2009.

  1. Susan

    Susan Guest

    All for Vista 64-bit Ultimate:

    1.) I've had a third falling out over 25 or so years with Symantec/Norton
    and am looking for a Registry search tool where you can search for a
    particular 'word' much as you do now but where it will list all the finds,
    review ones you want to delete, uncheck ones you want to keep and finally
    make it so (delete them). Doing this one at at time is such a waste of
    time--hundreds of occurrences of 'Symantec' and I still have 'Norton',
    'Ghost', and '360' to purge out of the Registry. (BTW, Norton's removal
    tool hardly touched Registry entries, left empty Windows Explorer folders,
    and was not product selective--did they even think of the Registry?) This
    time around I would rather find a manual way to scrubbing the Registry but
    also a tool that will seek out orphaned key remnants too!

    2.) Also the Registry... Why doesn't the Registry tree close up
    automagically? Is there any easy way of doing this?

    3.) Also the Registry... Might the tool(s) you recommend up above also
    include compacting (getting rid of) the Registry free space?

    4.) Under Services I have Disabled and Stopped the Windows Search and
    Superfetch services. However I'm pretty sure the main hog all along was
    Norton 360. It doesn't matter though since I don't find any loss not having
    Indexing and/or Superfetch. Indexing I also turned off first in both my C:\
    and D:\ drives. I also turned off Windows Defender from its own window. I
    don't think I found it listed as a service or as an add/remove program or
    Windows feature? Are there any other useless services out of the huge list
    of services you might recommend me to Disable if they aren't?

    5.) I'm currently using Webroot which I used and liked in the past with
    Windows XP. When I switched to Vista 64-bit they hadn't quite released
    their new version that seems to work just fine and doesn't offer the
    intrusive atmosphere Norton 360 had. I added their Securities Suit though
    and now have a minor problem/concern. I seem to be double-firewalling. If
    I turn off Vista's firewall it thinks I'm unprotected? I'll be checking
    with Webroot Monday about this but thought one of you might know something
    about this (a simple fix) over the weekend.

    The main thing are finding tools that work best with the Vista 64-bit
    Ultimate Registry. Thank you.
     
    Susan, Jan 11, 2009
    #1
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  2. Susan

    Charlie42 Guest

    The built-in registry editor in Windows allows you to search for strings.
    Run it as administrator, type "regedit" in your start menu search box, then
    right click > Run as Administrator.

    Also, you could download a tool like CCleaner. It will probably make the job
    easier for your. NB: Do *not* use the automatic registry cleanup feature,
    and do *not* delete registry entries unless you are 100% sure of what you
    are doing.
    Sadly, even Symantec's own tool will not rid a computer completely of their
    products. However, you should run the tool two or three times with reboots
    in between. This way, the removal tool is able to delete more Symantec
    residue.

    CCleaner will not, and might I add: why should it? I doubt you will notice
    any performance increase at all by compacting the Windows registry. Leave it
    to Windows to maintain the registry, doing it yourself really has not been
    necessary for almost a decade of Windows versions.
    Like you say, Norton is the major culprit. I would recommend you just leave
    other services for now, at least until you can assess what performance your
    computer has gained from uninstalling Norton.

    I definately recommend you reenable Windows Defender. Running without it
    exposes your computer to malware, even if you have other security programs
    in place. It is generally adviced to run multiple anti-spyware scanners.
    Do not run multiple firewalls, they may conflict and cause connection
    problems.

    Security software that do not integrate properly with Windows is not
    something I would use. Search this newsgroup for "best security", "best anti
    virus" and so on. You will find a heap of advice on better programs to
    obtain.

    Charlie42
     
    Charlie42, Jan 11, 2009
    #2
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  3. Susan

    Flavius Guest

    Not always- sometimes especially if you many times install an
    uninstall programs compacting registry are recomended and reall
    increase performance

    I recomend
    freeware:'Quicksys RegDefrag - Defrag, Optimize and Compact Window
    Registry' (http://www.regdefrag.com/

    commercial:'TuneUp America - TuneUp Utilities 2009
    (http://www.tune-up.com/products/tuneup-utilities/
    of course it is tweaker but it have excellent registry cleaner an
    registry defragge
     
    Flavius, Jan 11, 2009
    #3

  4. There is no such thing as a "good" (meaning useful or beneficial)
    registry cleaner, free or otherwise. Some are less harmful than others,
    but because they're all nothing but snake oil, I won't recommend any.

    Why do you even think you'd ever need to clean your registry? What
    specific *problems* are you actually experiencing (not some program's
    bogus listing of imaginary problems) that you think can be fixed by
    using a registry "cleaner?"

    If you do have a problem that is rooted in the registry, it would
    be far better to simply edit (after backing up, of course) only the
    specific key(s) and/or value(s) that are causing the problem. After
    all, why use a chainsaw when a scalpel will do the job? Additionally,
    the manually changing of one or two registry entries is far less likely
    to have the dire consequences of allowing an automated product to make
    multiple changes simultaneously. The only thing needed to safely clean
    your registry is knowledge and Regedit.exe.

    The registry contains all of the operating system's "knowledge" of
    the computer's hardware devices, installed software, the location of the
    device drivers, and the computer's configuration. A misstep in the
    registry can have severe consequences. One should not even turning
    loose a poorly understood automated "cleaner," unless he is fully
    confident that he knows *exactly* what is going to happen as a result of
    each and every change.

    Having repeatedly seen the results of inexperienced people using
    automated registry "cleaners," I can only advise all but the most
    experienced computer technicians (and/or hobbyists) to avoid them all.
    Experience has shown me that such tools simply are not safe in the hands
    of the inexperienced user. If you lack the knowledge and experience to
    maintain your registry by yourself, then you also lack the knowledge and
    experience to safely configure and use any automated registry cleaner,
    no matter how safe they claim to be.

    More importantly, no one has ever demonstrated that the use of an
    automated registry "cleaner," particularly by an untrained,
    inexperienced computer user, does any real good, whatsoever. There's
    certainly been no empirical evidence offered to demonstrate that the use
    of such products to "clean" WinXP's registry improves a computer's
    performance or stability. Given the potential for harm, it's just not
    worth the risk.

    Granted, most registry "cleaners" won't cause problems each and
    every time they're used, but the potential for harm is always there.
    And, since no registry "cleaner" has ever been demonstrated to do any
    good (think of them like treating the flu with chicken soup - there's no
    real medicinal value, but it sometimes provides a warming placebo
    effect), I always tell people that the risks far out-weigh the
    non-existent benefits.

    I will concede that a good registry *scanning* tool, in the hands
    of an experienced and knowledgeable technician or hobbyist can be a
    useful time-saving diagnostic tool, as long as it's not allowed to make
    any changes automatically. But I really don't think that there are any
    registry "cleaners" that are truly safe for the general public to use.
    Experience has proven just the opposite: such tools simply are not safe
    in the hands of the inexperienced user.

    A little further reading on the subject:

    Why I don't use registry cleaners
    http://www.edbott.com/weblog/?p=643

    AumHa Forums • View topic - AUMHA Discussion: Should I Use a Registry
    Cleaner?
    http://aumha.net/viewtopic.php?t=28099


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/555375

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. ~Benjamin Franklin

    Many people would rather die than think; in fact, most do. ~Bertrand Russell

    The philosopher has never killed any priests, whereas the priest has
    killed a great many philosophers.
    ~ Denis Diderot
     
    Bruce Chambers, Jan 11, 2009
    #4

  5. This is not a snake-oil cleaner, but a scanner that's more powerful
    than Regedit's built-in search toll:

    RegScanner v1.51
    Copyright (c) 2004 - 2007 Nir Sofer
    Web Site: http://www.nirsoft.net


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/555375

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. ~Benjamin Franklin

    Many people would rather die than think; in fact, most do. ~Bertrand Russell

    The philosopher has never killed any priests, whereas the priest has
    killed a great many philosophers.
    ~ Denis Diderot
     
    Bruce Chambers, Jan 11, 2009
    #5

  6. Documentation? Benchmarks from before and after? Oh, and make
    sure they either been notarized or verified by an independent
    laboratory. In other words, only when someone finally produces
    verifiable scientific evidence will I give such claims a lick of credence.

    Please provide documented, independently verifiable scientific evidence
    that using such a product actually improves the stability and
    performance of a computer. If you do, you'll be the first to have ever
    done so.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/555375

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. ~Benjamin Franklin

    Many people would rather die than think; in fact, most do. ~Bertrand Russell

    The philosopher has never killed any priests, whereas the priest has
    killed a great many philosophers.
    ~ Denis Diderot
     
    Bruce Chambers, Jan 11, 2009
    #6
  7. Is this the toll that failed you:

    Uninstalling your Norton products on Windows XP (Link may wrap)
    http://service1.symantec.com/Suppor...iew=docid&pid=2006032009205413&pkb=sharedtech


    Yes, it is poor programming on Symantec's part. That's one of the main
    reasons why I don't know a single IT Professional who would recommend
    the use of Symantec's consumer-grade products.

    It's not that the registry is "untouchable," per se, but rather that
    some missed Symantec remnant is restoring registry entries upon reboot.


    But, since I
    This would be a question to direct towards the maker of Webroot.
    It's not so much meaningless as it is pointless. The most you'd do is
    free up a microscopic amount of hard drive space. The "gain" would be
    undetectable.
    You might find these useful:

    ERUNT and NTREGOPT
    http://www.larshederer.homepage.t-online.de/erunt/


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/555375

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. ~Benjamin Franklin

    Many people would rather die than think; in fact, most do. ~Bertrand Russell

    The philosopher has never killed any priests, whereas the priest has
    killed a great many philosophers.
    ~ Denis Diderot
     
    Bruce Chambers, Jan 16, 2009
    #7


  8. Susan-
    Try Regseeker: http://www.hoverdesk.net/freeware.htm to remove *specific registry
    entries related to the Norton install.

    Then go to the "Find in registry" & type in "Norton" & it will come up with all the
    registry items related to that.
    Then you can repeat the process by typing "Symantec" in the search box & it will show
    all those items that you can remove.

    You can select which ones to remove by using the Ctrl & Shift keys or you can just
    click on the "Select" check mark & scroll to Select All.
    Then it's just a matter of hovering over those entries & click to remove the selected
    items.

    *Be sure that the "backup before deletion" box is checked & it will create a .reg
    file that easily restored if needed.(should be already checked by default)

    It also has a "Search files" feature. Just stay away from the "Clean the Registry"
    feature.


    ~Gary
     
    Gary Brandenburg, Jan 19, 2009
    #8
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