Sleep Vs Hibernate while Travelling

Discussion in 'Windows Vista General Discussion' started by Sumit, Jan 17, 2008.

  1. Sumit

    Sumit Guest

    Hello,

    I would be grateful if someone could help me out with this one.

    Which is the recommended way of carrying a laptop? Should it be Sleep or in
    Hibernate mode while it is being carried around in a case or a sleeve? I
    would have thought that carrying a laptop in sleep was safe. However,
    recently I had found it had woken up and got really hot -- until finally it
    was shutoff due to a safety feature that prevents it from overheating.

    Which mode do most of you prefer when you carry your computers around?

    Thanks.
    Sumit.
     
    Sumit, Jan 17, 2008
    #1
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  2. Sumit

    copihaus Guest

    I particulary do not use any of those features but Hibernation Mode is most
    recommendable as in uses the Hard Drive to save System status rather than
    RAM as Sleep mode does. Consider the power usage if you are concerned about
    battery life though, as Sleep mode stops the Drive but needs to keep feeding
    the electronics while Hibernation requires a full hard restart from cold
    with the advantage of saving time at boot time as it just restores your
    previous session. I don't really know which of both is better at power
    saving but it really depends of the circumstances. In terms of speed Sleep
    Mode is ahead just cause the way it was named differences them.

    You just said it yourself, Sleep mode could arise the overheating issue
    ending up loosing your current session should it also run out of battery
    without you noticing. In Hibernation mode you still have the chance of
    finding a socket somewhere to resume your work rather than running in the
    middle of an airport carrying a hot tray shouting for power ..... for
    example.

    If really depends on the case. Sleep mode is also faster as it dumps
    everything on RAM and is most useful if you move from a coffee shop to a
    waiting lounge; hibernation would be more useful if it is going to be a
    little while longer until you will be able to use your laptop again, for
    which I would just recommend a normal shut down.

    I just carry an extra spare battery just in case and swap them from time to
    time for life prolonging matters more than anything.
     
    copihaus, Jan 17, 2008
    #2
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  3. Sumit

    copihaus Guest

    I particulary do not use any of those features but Hibernation Mode is most
    recommendable as in uses the Hard Drive to save System status rather than
    RAM as Sleep mode does. Consider the power usage if you are concerned about
    battery life though, as Sleep mode stops the Drive but needs to keep feeding
    the electronics while Hibernation requires a full hard restart from cold
    with the advantage of saving time at boot time as it just restores your
    previos session. I don't really know which of both is better at power saving
    but it really depends of the circumstances. In terms of speed Sleep Mode is
    ahead just cause the way it was named differences them.

    You just said it yourself, Sleep mode could arise the overheating issue
    ending up loosing your current session should it also run out of battery
    without you noticing. In Hibernation mode you still have the chance of
    finding a socket somewhere to resume your work rather than running in the
    middle of an airport carrying a hot tray shouting for power ..... for
    example.

    If really depends on the case. Sleep mode is also faster as it dumps
    everything on RAM and is most usefull if you move from a coffee shop to a
    waiting lounge; hibernation would be more usefull if it is going to be a
    little while longer until you will be able to use your laptop again, for
    which I would just recommend a normal shut down.

    I just carry an extra spare battery just in case and swap them from time to
    time for life prolonging matters more than anything.
     
    copihaus, Jan 17, 2008
    #3
  4. Sumit

    Tim Slattery Guest

    In "Sleep" mode RAM is still powered, so that it will not lose its
    contents. Disk drives and monitors are powered down. I think the CPU
    has to stay up, so that it can handle the "wake up" event, and current
    certainly has to flow through the motherboard in order to get to the
    RAM. There's usually some kind of LED display that lets you know that
    the machine is in sleep mode.

    So you've got some current flowing through your machine. That will
    generate some heat. If your machine can't dissipate that heat as fast
    as it generates it, the heat will build up, as you've seen. I guess
    the bag you carried it in tended to keep heat in.

    When you hibernate your machine, it saves everything - RAM contents,
    video memory contents, whatever - to a disk file and turns itself off.
    No current flows, no heat builds up. So if you're having heat troubles
    with a sleeping machine, it seems to me that the solution is to
    hibernate it instead.
     
    Tim Slattery, Jan 17, 2008
    #4
  5. Sumit

    MICHAEL Guest

    Hibernate, mostly

    Sleep, if I am at home.

    However, sometimes I just shut down my laptop when traveling if it
    will be a few hours going unused.


    -Michael
     
    MICHAEL, Jan 17, 2008
    #5
  6. Sumit

    Kerry Brown Guest


    I power mine down. After a lot of experience with many laptops and many OS'
    I've learned that both sleep and hibernation will eventually bite you. As
    you've found sleep still consumes some power. You may have some overheating
    problems and you will eventually deplete the battery and possibly lose data.
    With hibernation if the hibernation file gets corrupted you can end up in a
    boot loop where the computer won't start. The only fix is to boot from a CD
    and delete the hibernation file. I've seen this happen in all versions of
    Windows from Win 3.1 and Linux so it's not OS specific.
     
    Kerry Brown, Jan 17, 2008
    #6
  7. Richard G. Harper, Jan 17, 2008
    #7
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