Speed differences between 32-bit and 64-bit Vista?

Discussion in 'Windows Vista Hardware' started by Phillip Pi, Dec 28, 2006.

  1. Phillip Pi

    Phillip Pi Guest

    Hi.

    Since I installed both 32-bit and 64-bit Vista Ultimate Edition on my
    old test machine (ASUS K8V SE Deluxe, Athlon 64 3200+ [754 CPU], 512 MB
    of RAM, SATA HDD, etc.), I notice the speeds are identical. I can't see
    and feel any improvements. I did install the ATI Radeon 9600 AIW drivers
    to help the video speed, but I just don't see the speed differences. Am
    I expecting too much or missing something? I don't have any other
    program installed so far. It's just a bare Vista with the latest ATI/AMD
    video drivers from ati.com/amd.com.

    Thank you in advance. :)
    --
    Phillip Pi
    Senior Software Quality Assurance Analyst
    ISP/Symantec Online Services, Consumer Business Unit
    Symantec Corporation
    www.symantec.com
     
    Phillip Pi, Dec 28, 2006
    #1
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  2. x64 doesn't run faster. Clockspeed is determined by the hardware.
    Performance would increase if you up the ram to 1GB.
     
    Colin Barnhorst, Dec 28, 2006
    #2
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  3. Phillip Pi

    Theo Guest

    You won't see any difference while running 32-bit programs.
    You will only see a significant improvement in programs
    written for the 64-bit environment. Panorama Factory,
    http://www.panoramafactory.com/ used to have a comparison
    between 32-bit and 64-bit, but I couldn't find it just now.
     
    Theo, Dec 28, 2006
    #3
  4. Phillip Pi

    Phillip Pi Guest

    Aren't all the default Vista programs 64-bit? Or are they still in 32-bit?



    --
    Phillip Pi
    Senior Software Quality Assurance Analyst
    ISP/Symantec Online Services, Consumer Business Unit
    Symantec Corporation
    www.symantec.com
     
    Phillip Pi, Dec 28, 2006
    #4
  5. The bundled programs can be either. The kernel is 64bit.
     
    Colin Barnhorst, Dec 28, 2006
    #5
  6. Phillip Pi

    Phillip Pi Guest

    Ah. Hmm, maybe that's why I can't feel/see the differences.


    --
    Phillip Pi
    Senior Software Quality Assurance Analyst
    ISP/Symantec Online Services, Consumer Business Unit
    Symantec Corporation
    www.symantec.com
     
    Phillip Pi, Dec 28, 2006
    #6
  7. The clock speed is the same so you would not see differences. Performance
    of either platform on a 64bit cpu is a matter of the hardware. Where you
    would see a difference is between running a 32bit OS on a 32bit system
    versus a 64bit system. The increased efficiency (head room) on a 64bit
    system will benefit the 32bit OS in varying degrees.
     
    Colin Barnhorst, Dec 28, 2006
    #7
  8. Phillip Pi

    Phillip Pi Guest

    Are you saying if I had a dual core Athlon 64 939/AM2 setup, I would
    notice the performance differences on the same box?


    --
    Phillip Pi
    Senior Software Quality Assurance Analyst
    ISP/Symantec Online Services, Consumer Business Unit
    Symantec Corporation
    www.symantec.com
     
    Phillip Pi, Dec 28, 2006
    #8
  9. Phillip Pi

    LaRoux Guest

    Where it's really going to make a difference is when you go beyond the 4GB
    limit on the 32-bit Vista. Even Home Basic will support 8GB on x64 and Vista
    Ultimate x64 will support up to 128GB.

    I know this sounds like overkill today but you can bet you right index
    finger software makers will figure out a way to use up every bit as quick as
    prices fall enough for people to realistically purchase it. I wouldn't be at
    all surprised to see mid-level desktop systems with 2-4GB installed and
    supporting 16-32GB on sale this time next year.

     
    LaRoux, Dec 28, 2006
    #9
  10. Performance differences between what?

     
    Colin Barnhorst, Dec 28, 2006
    #10
  11. Phillip Pi

    Robert Moir Guest

    I'm not sure _why_ you expect to see a performance difference in the first
    place.

    Think of 64 bit as increasing the ability to carry heavier loads over longer
    distances rather than increasing the ability to sprint for 100 metres.
     
    Robert Moir, Dec 28, 2006
    #11
  12. Phillip Pi

    Phillip Pi Guest

    Differences between 32-bit and 64-bit on the same 64-bit machine. I was
    expecting 64-bit to be a bit smoother and faster.


    --
    Phillip Pi
    Senior Software Quality Assurance Analyst
    ISP/Symantec Online Services, Consumer Business Unit
    Symantec Corporation
    www.symantec.com
     
    Phillip Pi, Dec 29, 2006
    #12
  13. Phillip Pi

    Phillip Pi Guest

    Ah. I thought the bits were for speeds. Nevermind then!


    --
    Phillip Pi
    Senior Software Quality Assurance Analyst
    ISP/Symantec Online Services, Consumer Business Unit
    Symantec Corporation
    www.symantec.com
     
    Phillip Pi, Dec 29, 2006
    #13
  14. A 64bit cpu us more efficient in running both x86 and x64 operating systems
    than a 32bit cpu is. An x64 OS is more efficient where heavy memory
    requirements come into play and you have added memory above what an x86 OS
    can support. But it is the greater number of registers, larger caches, and
    other architectual advances of the 64bit cpu's that matters, not so much the
    code. That is not to say that code written to run 64bits natively won't
    perform better than 32bit code; it will. You can see performance gains, but
    not because the code is running faster.
     
    Colin Barnhorst, Dec 29, 2006
    #14
  15. Phillip Pi

    JW Guest

    If a 64 bit CPU can transfer data in 64 bit blocks instead of 32 bit blocks
    I would certainly expect that any application such as the OD itself that
    moves blocks data around to perform faster since it is the OS that moves the
    data normally and not the application and therefore itg can be done with 1/2
    of the number of move instructions being executed. Or course you would only
    see this gain with applications or OS functions that move a lot of date
    which certainly is not a lot of them.
     
    JW, Dec 29, 2006
    #15
  16. Phillip Pi

    Lang Murphy Guest

    So... gotta ask that stupid question... if'n I run VM's... and I do...
    LOL... am I going to benefit from x64 with it's higher RAM ceiling in which
    I could possibly run more VM's, even if the app is 32bit?

    Lang
     
    Lang Murphy, Dec 29, 2006
    #16
  17. Of course. VPC and the memory mangager will handle it fine. The ram
    allocation is a block of the host's memory but the 16bit or 32bit OS in the
    vm has sees its own address space starting at zero.
     
    Colin Barnhorst, Dec 29, 2006
    #17
  18. Phillip Pi

    Robert Moir Guest

    The bit 'width' of a processor doesn't map directly to speed. It maps to how
    much 'heavy lifting' of data it can do in one go, and this can lead to a
    speed increase, but it isn't a direct and obvious mapping.
     
    Robert Moir, Dec 29, 2006
    #18
  19. Phillip Pi

    Tom Lake Guest


    If the OS is 32-bit, however, it will only use half of the moved data at a time. the
    other 32-bits are "wasted" and the same number of fetches has to be done
    whether the processor is 32- or 64-bit. If the OS is 64-bit, all the data is used
    from every fetch. To get 64 bits using a 32-bit OS requires two reads of memory
    The first read gets 64 bits but the OS can't use that and so uses only the low
    32 bits and does another read to get the high 32 bits. A 64-bit OS, of course,
    gets all 64 bits in one read.

    Tom Lake
     
    Tom Lake, Dec 29, 2006
    #19
  20. Phillip Pi

    Theo Guest

    Theo, Dec 29, 2006
    #20
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