Stupid DHCP Question

Discussion in 'Server Networking' started by steves100, Sep 8, 2005.

  1. steves100

    steves100 Guest

    On a WIN2K3 server is it possible to assign a DHCP address during specific
    hours? I want to only let my nanny use her computer off hours. Her PC is a
    WIN98, so I can not set "LOGON HOURS", she could just hit ESC.

    Thanks

    Steve
     
    steves100, Sep 8, 2005
    #1
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  2. steves100

    Matt Gibson Guest

    No.

    And there's nothing to stop her from hard coding her IP address.

    Matt Gibson - GSEC
     
    Matt Gibson, Sep 8, 2005
    #2
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  3. steves100

    steves100 Guest

    Yeah I know that, that doesnt answer my question about only getting an
    address during certain hours.
     
    steves100, Sep 8, 2005
    #3
  4. steves100

    Matt Gibson Guest

    That was the "no" part ;-)

    Matt Gibson - GSEC

     
    Matt Gibson, Sep 8, 2005
    #4
  5. steves100

    CyberDroog Guest

    Group policies.
     
    CyberDroog, Sep 8, 2005
    #5
  6. steves100

    CyberDroog Guest

    Check out group policies. You can load a policy on the Win98 system such
    that no logon is permitted unless the system authenticates with the
    network.

    You don't have to do this through the server. Just run the policy editor
    on that system.
     
    CyberDroog, Sep 8, 2005
    #6
  7. steves100

    Matt Gibson Guest

    Win98 Workstation.

    Trying to lock down a win98 workstation is a futile act.

    Matt Gibson - GSEC
     
    Matt Gibson, Sep 8, 2005
    #7
  8. steves100

    CyberDroog Guest

    You won't lock it down as far as a power user is concerned (all you need to
    do is boot with a DOS floppy and edit the registry to remove the policies).
    But locking down for use by a nanny? No problem.

    Of course the obvious course of action is to just track her activities
    online. If she uses the system during work hours, fire her ass.
     
    CyberDroog, Sep 8, 2005
    #8
  9. steves100

    steves100 Guest

    I tried using Group Policies to only let Authenticated users logon. Doesn't
    seem to be working. Do I need to save it any where specific? Would this
    fix the ESC issue?

    Steve
     
    steves100, Sep 8, 2005
    #9
  10. Win98 does not acknowledge Group Policy.

    --
    Phillip Windell [MCP, MVP, CCNA]
    www.wandtv.com
    -----------------------------------------------------
    Understanding the ISA 2004 Access Rule Processing
    http://www.isaserver.org/articles/ISA2004_AccessRules.html

    Microsoft Internet Security & Acceleration Server: Guidance
    http://www.microsoft.com/isaserver/techinfo/Guidance/2004.asp
    http://www.microsoft.com/isaserver/techinfo/Guidance/2000.asp

    Microsoft Internet Security & Acceleration Server: Partners
    http://www.microsoft.com/isaserver/partners/default.asp
    -----------------------------------------------------
     
    Phillip Windell, Sep 8, 2005
    #10
  11. There are Local Policies that can be created using PolEdit on the Win98 box
    itself, but they are a pain to deal with and simply just aren't worth the
    trouble. They are, however, a very fast and efficient way make a mess with
    Win98.

    --
    Phillip Windell [MCP, MVP, CCNA]
    www.wandtv.com
    -----------------------------------------------------
    Understanding the ISA 2004 Access Rule Processing
    http://www.isaserver.org/articles/ISA2004_AccessRules.html

    Microsoft Internet Security & Acceleration Server: Guidance
    http://www.microsoft.com/isaserver/techinfo/Guidance/2004.asp
    http://www.microsoft.com/isaserver/techinfo/Guidance/2000.asp

    Microsoft Internet Security & Acceleration Server: Partners
    http://www.microsoft.com/isaserver/partners/default.asp
    -----------------------------------------------------
     
    Phillip Windell, Sep 8, 2005
    #11
  12. steves100

    CyberDroog Guest

    Groups Policies (i.e. Active Directory) on the server aren't going to work
    by default on a Win98 system. You can arrange it, but it might be more
    trouble than it is worth.

    I would suggest just running the system policy editor locally on the Win98
    system. You can keep the policy on the server, and direct the Win98 system
    to read it from there, but the policy file needs to be created on a Win98
    system.

    A simple overview of the process is here: http://www.zisman.ca/poledit/

    Microsoft's in depth coverage is here:
    http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/windows/98/all/reskit/en-us/part2/wrkc08.mspx

    Alternatively, you can just load a .reg file on the Win98 system to
    restrict login unless the system validates with the server (Note: all the
    system policies on Win98 are things you can do manually if you know the reg
    keys.) Below is the contents of my "Network Validation Lockout.reg". (I
    was kind of surprised I still had it since I haven't worked with a Win98
    system in quite some time.)


    REGEDIT4

    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Network\Logon]
    "MustBeValidated"=dword:00000001
     
    CyberDroog, Sep 9, 2005
    #12
  13. steves100

    CyberDroog Guest

    But with the group policy add-on, you can read the Win98 system policies
    from a policy file on the server.
     
    CyberDroog, Sep 9, 2005
    #13
  14. steves100

    CyberDroog Guest

    I probably should have mentioned that. Some of the effects of messing
    around with system policies on Win98 are anything but intuitive. The
    behavior resulting from an option being either checked, cleared, or
    greyed-out can sometimes seem mysterious.

    Luckily, you can just load a .reg file with the proper settings.
     
    CyberDroog, Sep 9, 2005
    #14
  15. steves100

    CyberDroog Guest

    Note: Change the 1 to a 0 to undo the action...


    --
    Democracy: Two wolves and a lamb voting on the issue of what to have for
    lunch.

    Republic: A Democracy where two hundred wolves and one hundred lambs elect
    two wolves and one lamb as their representatives to vote on the issue of
    what to have for lunch.

    Constitutional Republic: A Republic with a Constitution guaranteeing that
    lamb is not on the lunch menu. Eventually the Supreme Court rules - five
    wolves to four lambs - that mutton is not the same as lamb.

    Liberty: A Constitutional Republic where the lambs retain the right to keep
    and bear arms.
     
    CyberDroog, Sep 9, 2005
    #15
  16. steves100

    Dave Green Guest

    BIOS password and disabled floppy or correct boot order fixes that one.

    D
     
    Dave Green, Sep 12, 2005
    #16
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