The effects of a clean install

Discussion in 'Windows Vista Performance' started by Dave T., Aug 23, 2009.

  1. Dave T.

    Dave T. Guest

    When doing an install of Win 7, Does the entire drive get wiped, or just
    the C partition? I'm thinking of course of maintaining the recovery
    partition.

    Dave T.
     
    Dave T., Aug 23, 2009
    #1
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  2. Dave T.

    Bill Daggett Guest

    Problem is: you'll probably wipe the computer's ability to make use of
    the recovery partition using its boot manager that you see referenced
    when you start the system (Press F? to...).

    It's best that you make a complete backup of your drive before doing
    anything.

    Acronis True Image gets the most votes of confidence, but it will cost
    you close to $40 (check newegg.com for the lowest price). That is
    money well spent if you use it frequently to maintain an up-to-date
    backup of your system.

    A newcomer freebie that is getting good press is EASEUS Todo.

    Google it.
     
    Bill Daggett, Aug 23, 2009
    #2
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  3. Dave T.

    DL Guest

    Did not your PC supplier have a means of creating the recovery disks? most
    do.
    Since if your drive fails so will your option to use the recovery partition
     
    DL, Aug 24, 2009
    #3
  4. Dave T.

    Dave T. Guest

    I say again;

    When doing an install of Win 7, Does the entire drive get wiped, or just
    It should not matter whether I have recovery discs (which I do), I'm
    curious for an answer to the question. Why? I tested the disc when I
    made it, but the next time I put it in the tray, maybe it won't be good.
    I want to maintain the recovery partition.

    Dave T.
     
    Dave T., Aug 24, 2009
    #4
  5. Dave T.

    Dave Warren Guest

    In message <h6skqr$i42$-september.org> "Dave T."
    You can choose to upgrade, or to do a Custom install. If you do a
    Custom install then the entire *partition* gets wiped.

    However, the other's comments are very relevant in that even if the
    recovery partition is left intact, if it requires a special bootloader
    then it may not be usable.

    Note that only some recovery partitions use odd bootloaders, others are
    accessible from the BIOS directly, so this may not be an issue.
     
    Dave Warren, Aug 24, 2009
    #5
  6. Dave T.

    Dave T. Guest

    Dave, thanks for the info. I have a better understanding of it now. How
    can I determine whether or not the recovery partition is accessable from
    the BIOS? It is my intention to test Win 7 to decide whether or not I
    want to upgrade, and then revert back to Vista.
     
    Dave T., Aug 24, 2009
    #6
  7. Dave T.

    bruce2 Guest

    When you install Win 7, it will only install on the C: drive and will
    asked to be wiped out before installation. The other partitions
    including the recovery partition will not be touched unless you delete
    them.
     
    bruce2, Aug 24, 2009
    #7
  8. Dave T.

    Rick Rogers Guest

    Hi,

    In nearly all cases, the bootloader on the drive is modified by the
    manufacturer so that the user can access the recovery volume on demand. This
    has nothing to do with the system BIOS. If you install another OS, the boot
    sector will be modified by it and you will no longer have access to the
    recovery volume. Should you ever need to use it, you will need to contact
    the manufacturer for assistance (and likely have to pay for it) as the
    method of getting access back varies greatly.
     
    Rick Rogers, Aug 24, 2009
    #8
  9. Dave T.

    Dave T. Guest

    Rick,

    Understood, and thank you. Does this mean that the recovery disc would
    be unusable also?

    Dave T.
     
    Dave T., Aug 24, 2009
    #9
  10. Dave T.

    Dave T. Guest

    Thanks for the info Bruce.

    Dave T.
     
    Dave T., Aug 24, 2009
    #10
  11. Dave T.

    Rick Rogers Guest

    Hi,

    Quite the contrary, a recovery disk relies on the optical drive being listed
    as the first bootable device in the system BIOS ahead of the hard drive.
    Most systems are set this way by default. In this case, the hard drive (and
    the boot sector on it) is never loaded.
     
    Rick Rogers, Aug 24, 2009
    #11
  12. Dave T.

    Rick Rogers Guest

    The recovery volume will not be touched, but the bootloader used to access
    it will be, rendering it useless as you won't be able to access it.

    Win7 will call whatever volume it installs to as C:\, it does not have to be
    the existing C:\ drive. In fact, if C:\ is left intact and Win7 is installed
    to an alternate volumet, it will actually be relettered when Win7 is booted.
     
    Rick Rogers, Aug 24, 2009
    #12
  13. Dave T.

    Dave T. Guest

    Rick, thanks for all the info. If I read it all right, dual booting
    would be the better way to go, correct?

    Dave T.
     
    Dave T., Aug 24, 2009
    #13
  14. Dave T.

    Rick Rogers Guest

    Hi Dave,

    Dual booting will not preserve the bootloader for the recovery volume. There
    is only one boot sector on the hard drive, and it will be overwritten when
    you install any other OS, whether it is in a dual boot configuration,
    upgrade, or clean install.
     
    Rick Rogers, Aug 24, 2009
    #14
  15. Dave T.

    Dave T. Guest

    I get it now. Thanks a million Rick.

    Dave T.
     
    Dave T., Aug 24, 2009
    #15
  16. Dave T.

    Frank-FL Guest


    Why? The correct and safest route would be to contact the
    manufacturer and for a nominal cost get the recovery disks for your
    make, model and serial number. You are asking about something that
    may or may not happen three months down the road. (Windows 7)
     
    Frank-FL, Aug 25, 2009
    #16
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