Tough One!

Discussion in 'Windows Small Business Server' started by Thad, May 19, 2004.

  1. Thad

    Thad Guest

    Question:

    Our company outsources their email hosting to a third
    party company and we use Outlook 2002 and 2003 to connect
    to their POP3 servers to send/receive email.

    However, we recently purchased Server 2003 Small business
    so that we could use the sharing calendar functionality
    (only) within outlook. We set up an exchange account for
    each user and installed this Exchange mailbox into each
    Outlook client.

    My strange question: is it possible to synchronize the
    Outlook POP3 (default) 3rd party mailbox Calendar with
    the new Exchange Mailbox Calendar that we have setup?
    Since the 3rd Party mailbox is set as default, we would
    currently have to duplicate efforts to get the two
    Calendars synchronized. also, our users want to do things
    like synchronize their Palm Pilots to a Calendar and not
    have to double this effort as well.

    I have a feeling this is a tough request. any help??

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
     
    Thad, May 19, 2004
    #1
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  2. Why not allow the SBS 2003 Server to go and retreive the pop3 email for the
    users from you ISP and it delivers it to the Users Outlook and then just use
    your Outlook Calendar's for all your needs that functionality is there with
    this SBS 2003 Server.

    Roger Crawford
    HTS
     
    Roger Crawford, May 19, 2004
    #2
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  3. Thad

    Thad Guest

    Is that tough to configure? Our company doesnt have much
    experience with that - is it as simple as having the
    server pull down the POP3 mail and fowarding it. in
    otherwords, do we need any funky front-end server or DMZ
    or other stuff like that? can the SBS simply pull down
    the email and forward on? how do users on the outside of
    the office get the email - do they need to be VPN'd in to
    the office?
     
    Thad, May 19, 2004
    #3
  4. The pop3 connector that comes with SBS2k3 will take care of pulling down
    email from a POP3 and directing that to your users so you can do away with
    the POP3 being pulled directly by the users. As far as the remote calendar
    goes, you could manually pull the data over to a shared calendar in a
    public folder on the SBS server. Initially, this involves a lot of work,
    but in the long run you will be able to function locally. Users should then
    be able to synch with their Exchange calendar with no issues. A shared
    calendar will still have to be updated manually. I hope this answers your
    question.

    Raphael Whitfield,

    Microsoft Corporation



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    --------------------
     
    Raphael Whitfield [MSFT], May 19, 2004
    #4
  5. The POP3 connector is easy to configure. The wizard walks you through
    connecting to each individual mailbox or a global mailbox and setting up
    routing to a local user. Users outside the office have several options.

    1. Outlook Web Access
    2. RPC over HTTP
    3. You can enable POP3 server and users can retrieve pop mail directly from
    Exchange.

    I hope this information helps.

    Raphael Whitfield,

    Microsoft Corporation



    Get Secure! - www.microsoft.com/security



    =====================================================

    When responding to posts, please "Reply to Group" via

    your newsreader so that others may learn and benefit

    from your issue.

    =====================================================



    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.


    --------------------
     
    Raphael Whitfield [MSFT], May 19, 2004
    #5
  6. Thad

    Guest Guest

    Thank you - it does answer part of my quesiton.
    most of our users are laptop users and do work from home
    half the time. how would they get their email while using
    a broadband or dialup connection from home (i.e., Not on
    the SBS2003's LAN)?
     
    Guest, May 19, 2004
    #6
  7. They would us the Outlook Web Access feature or the RPC over HTTP feature
    using there Outlook on the Laptops.

    Roger Crawford
    HTS
     
    Roger Crawford, May 20, 2004
    #7
  8. You could also have them VPN into the SBS LAN. This is another feature that
    comes with SBS and can be configured using the Remote Access Wizard in the
    Internet and Email section of the server management console.

    Raphael Whitfield,

    Microsoft Corporation



    Get Secure! - www.microsoft.com/security



    =====================================================

    When responding to posts, please "Reply to Group" via

    your newsreader so that others may learn and benefit

    from your issue.

    =====================================================



    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.


    --------------------
     
    Raphael Whitfield [MSFT], May 21, 2004
    #8
  9. Thad

    Thad Guest

    Thank you very much for your help here! this gives me
    direction and i really appreciate you taking the time to
    answer this!

    -T
     
    Thad, May 30, 2004
    #9
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