Tree

Discussion in 'Windows 64 Bit' started by Uffe Kousgaard, Sep 23, 2010.

  1. The Tree command from the very old DOS days is missing in win64. Does anyone
    know of a replacement? Text output is desired.
     
    Uffe Kousgaard, Sep 23, 2010
    #1
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  2. Uffe Kousgaard

    Lynn McGuire Guest

    The Tree command from the very old DOS days is missing in win64. Does anyone
    It is in Windows 7 x64:

    [C:/dii/bench/dii]% which tree
    C:/windows/system32/tree.com

    C:\dii\bench>tree
    Folder PATH listing for volume ok
    Volume serial number is CC97-BE43
    C:.
    ├───chm
    ├───dii
    ├───gui
    └───guitest

    Lynn
     
    Lynn McGuire, Sep 23, 2010
    #2
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  3. But missing in xp64. I grabbed a copy from win2003/32 and it works OK here.

    I thought it was a 16-bit application, since it was missing.
     
    Uffe Kousgaard, Sep 23, 2010
    #3
  4. Uffe Kousgaard

    Lynn McGuire Guest

    It is in Windows 7 x64:
    The critical thing missing from windows x64 is edit.com. That
    has been unforgivable in my opinion.

    Lynn
     
    Lynn McGuire, Sep 23, 2010
    #4
  5. That codes is so old that it would take a complete re-write just to get it
    up to 32-bit. I'm not surprised that it hasn't been ported. Though I
    understand your desire for a good character mode text editor. My solution
    has been Vim -- it fully supports 64-bit.
     
    Charlie Russel-MVP, Sep 24, 2010
    #5
  6. This is one of many things that didn't make it into XP x64. Tree is,
    however, available in Win7 64-bit. As both a 32-bit and 64-bit command.
     
    Charlie Russel-MVP, Sep 24, 2010
    #6
  7. Uffe Kousgaard

    Paul Guest

    TreeSize Free is a good little piece of freeware. Besides displaying the
    tree, it has the advantage of showing hidden directories, that can be
    manipulated.
    Paul
     
    Paul, Sep 24, 2010
    #7
  8. Uffe Kousgaard

    Lynn McGuire Guest

    That codes is so old that it would take a complete re-write just to
    Thanks for the suggestion but I just dont like vi very much and I
    was a unix programmer for many years. I still use vi to maintain
    our website and marvel at it's compactness.

    Lynn
     
    Lynn McGuire, Sep 24, 2010
    #8
  9. Vim (and its GUI brother, gVim) is a lot more powerful and friendly that
    pure vi, though you can use it just as if it were vi. There are also ports
    of emacs floating around you could use. But expecting a 16 bit program to
    work is something we've already discussed several times. Run it in XPMode,
    or find a new one.
     
    Charlie Russel-MVP, Sep 25, 2010
    #9
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