turn off user account control

Discussion in 'Windows Vista Security' started by John A Grandy, Feb 16, 2009.

  1. How to turn off User Account Control ?

    The endless prompts are driving me batty ...
     
    John A Grandy, Feb 16, 2009
    #1
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  2. See this link from my website:
    http://www.winuser.co.uk/windows_vista_faq/08_turn_off_user_account_control.html

    --

    --
    John Barnett MVP
    Windows XP Associate Expert
    Windows Desktop Experience

    Web: http://www.winuser.co.uk
    Web: http://xphelpandsupport.mvps.org
    Web: http://vistasupport.mvps.org
    Web: http://www.silversurfer-guide.com

    The information in this mail/post is supplied "as is". No warranty of any
    kind, either expressed or implied, is made in relation to the accuracy,
    reliability or content of this mail/post. The Author shall not be liable for
    any direct, indirect, incidental or consequential damages arising out of the
    use of, or inability to use, information or opinions expressed in this
    mail/post..
     
    John Barnett MVP, Feb 16, 2009
    #2
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  3. Control Panel > Security Center > Other Security Settings


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/555375

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. ~Benjamin Franklin

    Many people would rather die than think; in fact, most do. ~Bertrand Russell

    The philosopher has never killed any priests, whereas the priest has
    killed a great many philosophers.
    ~ Denis Diderot
     
    Bruce Chambers, Feb 16, 2009
    #3
  4. John A Grandy

    Gordon Guest


    Why are you getting "endless prompts" I ONLY get a prompt when installing
    certain applications. I quite often go for days and days without any prompts
    at all. You shouldn't be getting "endless prompts" under normal use, unless
    you are using software that is not fully Vista compatible...
     
    Gordon, Feb 16, 2009
    #4
  5. John A Grandy

    Gordon Guest

    Gordon, Feb 16, 2009
    #5
  6. I have simply answered the OP's specific question which was how to turn UAC
    off. As far as the OP is concerned the prompts are 'driving him batty.' If
    there was a specific problem I would imagine that the OP would have pointed
    that out, in which case we could have elaborated a little more.

    While I agree, Yes we could have asked 'what is your specific problem' but I
    have found that, in many cases, a reply to ones specific questioning isn't
    always forthcoming. We spend a lot of time answering questions, not only on
    this newsgroup, but many others, and although most posts answered by me are
    flagged I don't always have the time to keep going back over old posts to
    see if someone has answered my specific question.

    Your own signature line says it all. We can only answer the question posed
    by the poster, if all the information isn't there we can only give an
    'approximate' answer and hope that that solves the problem. We certainly are
    not infallible, but we also do not get paid for our contributions to users
    problems and, in the end, we do have to juggle between a full time job and
    voluntary support technicians. We are not super human, we can't read minds,
    all we can do is answer the original question posed.

    --

    --
    John Barnett MVP
    Windows XP Associate Expert
    Windows Desktop Experience

    Web: http://www.winuser.co.uk
    Web: http://xphelpandsupport.mvps.org
    Web: http://vistasupport.mvps.org
    Web: http://www.silversurfer-guide.com

    The information in this mail/post is supplied "as is". No warranty of any
    kind, either expressed or implied, is made in relation to the accuracy,
    reliability or content of this mail/post. The Author shall not be liable for
    any direct, indirect, incidental or consequential damages arising out of the
    use of, or inability to use, information or opinions expressed in this
    mail/post..
     
    John Barnett MVP, Feb 16, 2009
    #6
  7. Under "Control Panel" select "User Accounts". Find the one you use and the
    bottom selection should say something like "turn user account control on or
    off". Excuse me if the text is not 100 % correct as I am using a Danish
    version and therefore do not know what it actually says in the English
    version
     
    Allan Michaelsen, Feb 16, 2009
    #7
  8. John A Grandy

    Gordon Guest


    I agree with all you say, but, as UAC is supposed to be a security function,
    my point was, that instead of just telling the OP how to turn off security,
    it might have been better to ask why he's getting all the prompts in the
    first place. (Could be malware, could be anything, if the OP is not actually
    doing anything himself to cause the prompts). I get UAC may be two or three
    times a week, while I'm doing an operation that requires raised access
    rights. If I suddenly started getting lots of UAC prompts when I wasn't
    doing anything, I personally wouldn't ask just how to turn it off, and I
    personally wouldn't expect any sort of computer professional to supply that
    simplistic response.

    Would you recommend turning off an AV application if it started giving lots
    of warnings?

    Just my 2p worth...
     
    Gordon, Feb 16, 2009
    #8
  9. John A Grandy

    Sam Hobbs Guest

    I agree that it is usually best to answer the question as stated, and doing
    that here is good. I know that when I ask a question, I am often frustrated
    when someone thinks I need to do something different and posts a message
    with something that does not help then argues with me when I explain that I
    actually do know what I am doing and that their suggestion does not help.

    Usually, I am in your position in the sense of being the person answering
    questions. I was the first person in the CodeGuru.com forums to reach 10,000
    posts and more than 99% of them were attempts to help others. I have also
    been answering questions in the MSDN forums. I know that people often ask
    for help solving a problem that they think is a solution to a more
    fundamental problem and that they should ask for help with the more
    fundamental problem.

    As for the UAC is concerned, I do find articles explaining how to turn off
    UAC but I don't find anything explaining the problems that might exist if I
    do; what vulnerabilities are possible that the UAC protects us from. If
    turning off the UAC makes an Administrator account behave essentially the
    same as the way that an Administrator account behaves in XP then for those
    of us that "know what we are doing" and use a limited account for everything
    that does not need Administrator privileges then it seems reasonable to turn
    it off. I wish someone would explain that and I have not seen that type of
    explanation.
     
    Sam Hobbs, Feb 16, 2009
    #9
  10. John A Grandy

    Spirit Guest

  11. John A Grandy

    Gordon Guest


    Do a lot of posting here do we? Who rattled your cage?
     
    Gordon, Feb 16, 2009
    #11

  12. UAC is a love/hate function with no grey area in-between. I have it turned
    OFF..
     
    Mike Hall - MVP, Feb 17, 2009
    #12
  13. John A Grandy

    Gordon Guest


    But you, I presume, know what you are doing. The OP presumably, may not....
     
    Gordon, Feb 17, 2009
    #13
  14. John A Grandy

    Mark H Guest

    How did we ever live without UAC?

    If you didn't have problems with malware before UAC, you probably don't need
    UAC now.
    With any other detection scheme, all those prompts would be called "false
    positives" and leads to ignoring the prompt.
    In that sense only, UAC is garbage.

    Is it protecting me? Not unless you actually pay attention to all those
    prompts and recognize who started the process.

    Nothing beats safe hex.
     
    Mark H, Feb 17, 2009
    #14
  15. John A Grandy

    Gordon Guest


    Of course. I expect someone with MVP status to know what they are doing.
    Most people do not - along with running as an admin account on a daily
    basis, which is also a major factor in the proliferation of viruses and
    Trojans.
    And in any case - if one does WORK with the machine rather than fiddling and
    messing with it, then the instance of UAC popping up is negligible. I get
    UAC maybe two or three times a WEEK.
     
    Gordon, Feb 17, 2009
    #15
  16. John A Grandy

    Mark H Guest

    If your antivirus asked you every time you clicked on a file:
    "The file you are about to open may be a virus. Do you wish to continue?"

    How long before you turned it off?

    If your firewall produced a message every time you accessed the internet:
    "Your computer is attempting to connect with the internet. This could result
    in the loss of personal information. Do you wish to continue?"

    How long before you turned it off?

    Live in whatever fear makes you feel safer.
    Still malware free after 30+ years on computers.

     
    Mark H, Feb 20, 2009
    #16
  17. John A Grandy

    Mark H Guest

    Well, you missed it completely.

    The point is not what an AV or Firewall does, it's that UAC produces too
    many false positive responses to be considered anything but a nuisance.

    I believe that in a company environment where standard setups are the only
    allowed software, you would hardly or never see the prompts. That's not me.
    I test software, restoring backups between every test to revert back to a
    "standard" machine. So, I see the prompts 20 to 30 times a day. And, yes, I
    just click Continue since I already know what is driving the prompt.

    I don't turn UAC off, because it would invalidate the testing and it tends
    to cause other errors with permissions during installation of files when
    turned off and I have to know what the customer is going to run into as they
    would experience it.

    Yes, I typically operate as an admin over 50% of the time since I am not
    part of a greater network with a bunch of people who would install garbage
    for me if I didn't right the rules to block it. And, despite this, I still
    don't get malware. I do use an AV, Firewall, Router and occasionally scan
    for the garbage, but seldom find anything more than "spyware" cookies. (The
    "more" is still classified as spyware, not malware.)
     
    Mark H, Feb 21, 2009
    #17
  18. No, you have missed the point entirely.
    They are NOT false positive responses. Whatever you are trying to do
    requires escalated privileges to use the user-admin account's full-
    rights access token to perform the task or allow a program to run that
    needs full-admin-rights to execute, with UAC enabled.
    That's you.
    You are correct that it will cause problems with UAC disabled, because
    the admin-account you're using out of the box that Vista gives one is
    not a full-admin-rights account even with UAC disabled. In certain
    situations with UAC disable, the user-admin account must still be
    escalated and it can't be escalated, therefore, the problem.
    As far as your testing, you do know about the hidden-full-admin-rights
    at all times admin account? You can use that account to test with, leave
    UAC enabled, and you will not get any UAC prompts, because it's already
    escalated to full-admin-rights. And yes, it's that same account that's
    on the previous versions of the NT based O/S(s).

    <http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/wind...idden-administrator-account-on-windows-vista/>
    <http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc709691.aspx>

    Here is a little FYI for you, anything that runs with the O/S can be
    fooled just like the O/S can be fooled, because it all written by human
    beings and we are not perfect.

    <http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc512587.aspx>

    You shouldn't lean on your little detection crutch too hard. You should
    look around from time to time to see what's running on the machine with
    the proper tools.

    <http://www.windowsecurity.com/artic...d_Rootkit_Tools_in_a_Windows_Environment.html>
     
    Jack the Ripper, Feb 21, 2009
    #18
  19. John A Grandy

    Sam Hobbs Guest

    Another possibility is that the developers might not be using the least
    privileges that their software needs and instead required Administrator
    privileges.
     
    Sam Hobbs, Feb 21, 2009
    #19
  20. John A Grandy

    Sam Hobbs Guest

    If there were a very real possibility that prompts such as that could
    prevent malware from getting executed (or not killed depending on the
    definition of executed) then it would be foolish to turn them off.
     
    Sam Hobbs, Feb 21, 2009
    #20
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