Tweak Vista Home Premium to join a Domain!

Discussion in 'Windows Vista Security' started by Niggiebro, Dec 19, 2007.

  1. Niggiebro

    Niggiebro Guest

    Hey all,

    Just checking to see if anyone has come around or knows of a Tweak to
    have Vista Home Premium join a Domain.

    I know of one that worked with XPMC 2005 and it worked great!!! :D

    The only reason I'm looking for such a Tweak is so that after mapping a
    Drive, Login and restarting my system I don't have to re-login to the
    mapped Drive again, because MS didn't think this through! :mad:

    You are given the option to Manage Your Network Passwords, but you
    really *CANNOT!!! :mad: *Because that option is Shaded Out! You can only
    manage a user name and password for a Web Site or Program... :(

    I hope someone can relate...

    Thx! :D
     
    Niggiebro, Dec 19, 2007
    #1
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  2. Niggiebro

    Malke Guest

    You can't "tweak" Vista Home to join a domain. The reason you were able
    to get one particular version of XP MCE to join a domain is that MCE is
    a superset of XP Pro, not Home. XP Pro can join a domain; XP Home can't.

    If you need a Vista Home machine to join a domain, upgrade it to
    Business, Ultimate, or Enterprise.


    Malke
     
    Malke, Dec 19, 2007
    #2
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  3. Upgrade to Vista Business or Enterprise.


    All you need do is please a simple drive mapping script in your Start
    folder to handle the task for you

    Microsoft isn't the one who purchased an OS that doesn't meet his needs.




    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. ~Benjamin Franklin

    Many people would rather die than think; in fact, most do. ~Bertrand Russell

    The philosopher has never killed any priests, whereas the priest has
    killed a great many philosophers.
    ~ Denis Diderot
     
    Bruce Chambers, Dec 20, 2007
    #3
  4. Niggiebro

    Chris Game Guest

    Unfortunately MSFT *is* the one who defined the features for the
    various SKUs[1], without much apparent thought. The selection issue
    became so complex, many people ended up with the edition they
    thought they needed, but which disabled some feature the customer
    really needed![2]

    [1] this stupid piece of jargon apparently means: stock keeping
    unit.

    [2] See
    http://www.microsoft-watch.com/content/vista/what_went_wrong_with_windows_vista.html
    point 10.
     
    Chris Game, Dec 20, 2007
    #4


  5. Which part of the word "Home" (see subject line) do you not understand?
    When did Microsoft ever offer a "Home" OS that was capable of joining
    a domain?

    I'd say it was the OP who made the purchase "without much apparent
    thought," wouldn't you?


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. ~Benjamin Franklin

    Many people would rather die than think; in fact, most do. ~Bertrand Russell

    The philosopher has never killed any priests, whereas the priest has
    killed a great many philosophers.
    ~ Denis Diderot
     
    Bruce Chambers, Dec 21, 2007
    #5
  6. Niggiebro

    GTS Guest

    The OP's real concern isn't joining a domain, but the inability of Home
    versions to cache credentials (a common misstatement by less technical end
    users). That's a serious limitation even in "Home" versions used in a home
    workgroup setting. This can sometimes be circumvented by using non-password
    (guest) file sharing, but not always, depending on the mix of OS's involved.

    As you advised, using a batch file in start up had been generally the best
    solution, and we use that frequently with XP Home. Note however that this
    doesn't work as easily in Vista as UAC prevents it from running. Many of
    these version distinctions, exist purely for marketing reasons to drive up
    the price of Windows while circumventing possible oversight given MS's
    monopoly status. This problems causes considerable frustration to average
    users who just want to share a few files in a simple home network. I would
    respectfully suggest that blaming the user for not being an expert and
    anticipating the problem is somewhat lacking in fairness.
    --

     
    GTS, Dec 21, 2007
    #6
  7. Niggiebro

    Chris Game Guest

    Fairly put; I'm afraid though that Bruce follows the MSFT line in
    pigeon holing 'home' users without any real knowledge of what they
    need in an OS. Forcing users to upgrade to the ultimate version just
    to get simple things to work properly is downright underhand, and of
    course the information available to purchasers before sale is
    usually severely limited, it's only when you get the DVD home and
    install it that the limitations come to light.
     
    Chris Game, Dec 21, 2007
    #7
  8. Niggiebro

    Stretch Guest

    I would have thought the real issue was overhead. Takes more resources
    to run a domain. It also has to be administered. Then you need
    to set up clients and servers, etc. More resources than the normal
    home user needs or wants to waste. Then there's how.

    Plus, there's security issues. Too complex for a stand alone system like
    home basic or premium.
     
    Stretch, Dec 23, 2007
    #8
  9. Niggiebro

    Niggiebro Guest

    I would have thought the real issue was overhead. Takes more resources
    to run a domain. It also has to be administered. Then you need
    to set up clients and servers, etc. More resources than the normal
    home user needs or wants to waste. Then there's how.

    Plus, there's security issues. Too complex for a stand alone system like
    home basic or premium.

    --
    Curtis D. Levin KD4ZKW

    You guys are all right! ! ! It's true what M$ is doing, but to take away a
    simple thing like mapping a drive and managing a network account, (that
    means Windows saving you login and password), things that were easily done
    on Windows 95 - Me... I mean come-on!

    I understand yes that servers, clients, group policies, active directory,
    accounts, permissions..... is a bit too much for your everyday HOME USER,
    but yes don't you think they have the right the share a file or two and stay
    locked on it the next time you start-up your system?

    I know there's some developer out there just hating this very thing and
    everthing that M$ is during, that they'll find the tweaks to get around
    these issues and will put it out there and that's why I am just asking? ;)
     
    Niggiebro, Dec 23, 2007
    #9
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