Two different software compatibility lists? huh??

Discussion in 'Windows Vista General Discussion' started by johnm, Feb 25, 2007.

  1. johnm

    johnm Guest

    I see (via a WinInfo newsletter) that Microsoft is releasing TWO
    Vista-Compatible Logo Lists (for software compatibility)
    (http://support.microsoft.com/kb/933305)

    Oh OK, I get it now. There's the "Certified for Windows Vista" List, then
    there's the "Works with Windows Vista" List.

    <slapping my forehead> But of course!!
    The first one pretty much guarantees it will work in Vista, while the second
    only IMPLIES it will.

    Hats off to the boys in marketing.
    That oughta clear things up for consumers.
     
    johnm, Feb 25, 2007
    #1
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  2. Hold hammer in hand. Then slap forehead.

    --


    Regards,

    Richard Urban
    Microsoft MVP Windows Shell/User
    (For email, remove the obvious from my address)

    Quote from George Ankner:
    If you knew as much as you think you know,
    You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!
     
    Richard Urban, Feb 25, 2007
    #2
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  3. Jonathan Yaniv, Feb 25, 2007
    #3
  4. I assume you did actually read the article where the distinction between
    the two levels is stated.

    The "Certified for Windows Vista" logo is a compatibility designation for
    applications and devices that have passed a rigorous testing program on
    computers that are running Windows Vista. The technical requirements for
    this designation target four core areas: reliability, security,
    compatibility with Windows Vista and future operating systems, and
    installation and removal.

    The "Works with Windows Vista" logo is a compatibility designation that is
    designed to encourage Windows Vista compatibility for the current generation
    of Windows-based applications. To receive this designation, software
    companies test their applications to make sure that the applications meet
    the program's guidelines.

    So what is your actual problem with the differentiator between the two ??
     
    Mike Brannigan, Feb 25, 2007
    #4
  5. Jonathan,

    You don't ask to be nominated as an MVP. After putting in your years of
    helping others (you have been around for about 2 weeks), you may be noticed
    and nominated. You strive to help others because you have the talent and
    like doing so - for a long period of time. The recognition is for what you
    have done in the "past" year, not the past weeks.

    Keep coming back and assisting as you can.

    --


    Regards,

    Richard Urban
    Microsoft MVP Windows Shell/User
    (For email, remove the obvious from my address)

    Quote from George Ankner:
    If you knew as much as you think you know,
    You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!
     
    Richard Urban, Feb 25, 2007
    #5
  6. Yep and believe it or not there is also a Vista compatible sticker, if
    or not Microsoft has a list for that don't know. LOL!

    1. Certified for Windows... my brand new high cost MB said so and it
    won't do SATA in Vista unless I cripple the drives and have them
    run as IDE drives.

    2. Works with Windows Vista, so claimed by Nivida card, but still
    don't have fully working drivers capable of supporting all the
    3D and special effects features.

    3. Vista compatible, well sort of, ut Easy Creator 9 causes a
    driver incompatible error message every time you boot.

    Got to love those clever marketing guys at Microsoft.
     
    Adam Albright, Feb 25, 2007
    #6
  7. johnm

    Mikeb Guest

    The big question is - is Vista Certified to work yet......
     
    Mikeb, Feb 25, 2007
    #7
  8. johnm

    johnm Guest

    uhm....., yes I did. I could explain what my -actual- point was but I fear
    it would get lost .. again.

    That last part has been a personal favorite of mine, and afaik been included
    in every certification requirement since Win95.

    The part about <drumroll> "....installation and removal.... "

    Back in 95 this was explained to us that in order to become "certified" an
    application had to, among other things, come with a proper, and WORKING
    uninstall routine.

    As anyone who has ever attempted to UNINSTALL a Windows application knows,
    most leave behind garbage trails a mile wide - leftover files, entire
    folders of now useless crap, spread across multiple locations, and let's not
    forget the hundreds of lines of clutter that will forever bloat your
    registry.

    I even recall as a beta tester back then bringing this up to MS, and how it
    seemed THEY were in fact the biggest offenders here. MS apps NEVER cleanly
    uninstalled.
    Even then it was a simple experiment that anyone could do, even without
    registry knowledge.
    Create a registry backup. Install Office. Uninstall Office. Make another
    registry backup. Compare before & after. ...Oh my.

    If MS doesn't follow their own criteria for certification, why should anyone
    else, and in fact, do they? probably not.
    Sorta raises a credibility question about the whole process don't ya think?
    some rigorous testing program.

    iow, Just more fodder from marketing - with no real world value.
     
    johnm, Feb 25, 2007
    #8
  9. Works With Windows Vista = The application developer does the testing
    himself. Now, seeing all the people who post here who think nothing of
    cheating and stealing, I don't think it a stretch to believe that the apps
    developer may just fudge a bit also to increase sales. He can worry about
    any consequences at a later date after he has your money.

    Certified For Windows Vista = The last step is that the application
    developer must pick one of the authorized testing services recommended by
    Microsoft, send them the application and have the application be certified.
    Likely to be a true picture as to whether, or not, the application will fly
    with Vista.

    That's a hell of a difference between the two Logo's.

    And, with either of the methods above, you will still have problems using
    different hardware combinations. They can't test them all.


    Read about them here!

    http://microsoft.mrmpslc.com/InnovateOnWindowsVista/Default.aspx?LangType=4105



    --


    Regards,

    Richard Urban
    Microsoft MVP Windows Shell/User
    (For email, remove the obvious from my address)

    Quote from George Ankner:
    If you knew as much as you think you know,
    You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!
     
    Richard Urban, Feb 25, 2007
    #9
  10. johnm

    johnm Guest

    uhm....., yes I did. I could explain what my -actual- point was but I fear
    it would get lost .. again.

    That last part has been a personal favorite of mine, and afaik been included
    in every certification requirement since Win95.

    The part about <drumroll> "....installation and removal.... "

    Back in 95 this was explained to us that in order to become "certified" an
    application had to, among other things, come with a proper, and WORKING
    uninstall routine.

    As anyone who has ever attempted to UNINSTALL a Windows application knows,
    most leave behind garbage trails a mile wide - leftover files, entire
    folders of now useless crap, spread across multiple locations, and let's not
    forget the hundreds of lines of clutter that will forever bloat your
    registry.

    I even recall as a beta tester back then bringing this up to MS, and how it
    seemed THEY were in fact the biggest offenders here. MS apps NEVER cleanly
    uninstalled.
    Even then it was a simple experiment that anyone could do, even without
    registry knowledge.
    Create a registry backup. Install Office. Uninstall Office. Make another
    registry backup. Compare before & after. ...Oh my.

    If MS doesn't follow their own criteria for certification, why should anyone
    else, and in fact, do they? probably not.
    Sorta raises a credibility question about the whole process don't ya think?
    some rigorous testing program.

    iow, Just more fodder from marketing - with no real world value.
     
    johnm, Feb 25, 2007
    #10
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