UAC

Discussion in 'Windows Vista Security' started by Julsie, Feb 25, 2008.

  1. Julsie

    Julsie Guest

    I have a program called DragonDictate which will not start in "elevated
    mode". So, after my computer has started I have to untick the UAC in the
    users account, restart my computer and start DragonDictate.
    My problem is that after a few hours DragonDictate ceases to function and
    when I check in the users account I see that the uac as once more "corrected
    itself" and it is ticked again which means I have to start procedure again if
    I want to use my dictation program.
    Is there no way at all whereby I can permanently cancel the uac. I am
    prepared to take the risks that may involve. To have to reboot my computer
    every few hours to get programmes to work is a real nuisance.

    I would really appreciate some help for this
     
    Julsie, Feb 25, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Did you install DragonDictate as Administrator?

    --
    @~@ Might, Courage, Vision, SINCERITY.
    / v \ Simplicity is Beauty! May the Force and Farce be with you!
    /( _ )\ (Xubuntu 7.04) Linux 2.6.24.2
    ^ ^ 20:03:01 up 13 days 10:03 0 users load average: 0.00 0.01 0.00
    ? ? (CSSA):
    http://www.swd.gov.hk/tc/index/site_pubsvc/page_socsecu/sub_addressesa/
     
    Man-wai Chang ToDie, Feb 25, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Julsie

    Mark Guest

    Uninstall DragonDictate.
    Delete any remnants you find... folders, files.
    Turn off UAC.
    Re-install DragonDictate.
    Leave UAC off. (If you turn it back on, DragonDictate will cease to
    function.)
    Some programs don't like it when UAC changes state after installation.

    Now standby for all the UAC advocates, who somehow managed to survive the
    last 30 years without it, telling you how bad it is to turn this off and how
    much fun it is to answer that stupid prompt 10 times a day or more.
     
    Mark, Feb 25, 2008
    #3
  4. Julsie

    Malke Guest

    What do DragonDictate's tech support people say?

    Malke
     
    Malke, Feb 25, 2008
    #4
  5. Julsie

    Julsie Guest

    Thank you all for replying.
    My problem simply is that If i turn off UAC it finds a way of reinstating!!!1
    I want to remove it permanently- UAC
     
    Julsie, Feb 25, 2008
    #5
  6. Never see the prompt.

    If you install programs the proper way, you never see it.
     
    Susan Bradley, Feb 25, 2008
    #6
  7. Julsie

    Mark Guest

    Congratulations!
    The proper way?
    You mean you don't take a disk out of the box and use the standard method of
    installation... you know: autorun.inf, setup.exe, install.exe, etc.?
    (I noticed you didn't post this miracle cure so it could be tested by those
    that install, test and remove ten or more programs a day.)
     
    Mark, Feb 25, 2008
    #7
  8. Julsie

    Phil Wilson Guest

    The miracle cure is to write apps and installation programs that don't
    require administrator privileges. Unfortunately hardly anybody can be
    bothered to do it because they've got used to NOT doing it (over the past 30
    yrs). Should games really require administrator privilege to install and
    run?
     
    Phil Wilson, Feb 26, 2008
    #8
  9. Julsie

    Kayman Guest

    Your real problem is that you refuse to listen to good advice.
    Start educate yourself!
    Re-read the responses from Malke, Susan and M-wai and act accordingly.
    Very bad idea!

    Do not work in elevated level; Day-to-day work should be performed while
    the User Account Control (UAC) is enabled. Turning off UAC reduces the
    security of your computer and may expose you to increased risk from
    malicious software.
    http://technet2.microsoft.com/Windo...8514-4c9e-ac08-4c21f5c6c2d91033.mspx?mfr=true

    Familiarize yourself with "Services Hardening in Windows Vista".
    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/technetmag/issues/2007/01/SecurityWatch/

    UAC is important to have running in the first place, and it's doubly true
    with the average consumer PC, which commonly has a non-technical user
    responsible for maintaining it.
    http://itsvista.com/2008/02/12-of-consumers-disable-vistas-uac-down-from-16/

    Peez of Pith :)
     
    Kayman, Feb 26, 2008
    #9
  10. Julsie

    Bob Guest

    I disagree. If you are running AV, AS (2 or more) and a firewall AND you
    have a working brain you don't need UAC.
     
    Bob, Feb 26, 2008
    #10
  11. No I blog about it. :)

    Stick the cdrom in,
    Browse to the cdrom,
    right mouse click on the setup file
    Run as administrator

    Install

    If the program is an older crappy one you use Luabuglight tool or
    Process Explorer to determine the needed registry keys/permissions to be
    tweaked.

    http://blogs.msdn.com/aaron_margosis/archive/2006/08/07/LuaBuglight.aspx
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896653.aspx

    You can change the 'run as XP sp2' or 'run as administrator' in the
    compatability tab, but I prefer the Luabuglight method as it's the same
    thing I need to identify to get these same programs to run without
    administrator rights on XP.

    It's no miracle cure, it's a tested process.

    Is it too much for the consumer crowd? Absolutely which is why in her
    case if she can't get an update from the Vendor, which is what Malke was
    saying she would be better off adjusting the UAC to silently elevate.
    But turning it off turns off protected mode for IE.

    In my preference it would be

    Adjusting it to silently elevate --
    http://msmvps.com/blogs/bradley/archive/2008/02/08/keep-your-bikini-on.aspx
    Hacking the permissions --
    http://msmvps.com/blogs/bradley/archive/2008/02/20/installing-quickbook-2006-on-vista.aspx
    http://msmvps.com/blogs/bradley/archive/2008/01/26/dusting-off-command-line-for-vista.aspx

    Ain't rocket science, but I'd argue it's better than "turn it off and
    wait for the UAC advocates to post".
     
    Susan Bradley, Feb 26, 2008
    #11
  12. Why does one need 2 or more AS?

    UAC helps me and my working brain.

    It also forced vendors to start coding more appropriately.

    I don't need to be an administrator when I'm merely running software.
     
    Susan Bradley, Feb 26, 2008
    #12
  13. Julsie

    Mark Guest

    Thanks for the clarification, but if I had to do that for every program I
    load, test and uninstall I'd have given up on Vista a long time ago.
    Turning off the prompts with the registry entry simply elevates most
    programs (turns UAC off), but it is not supposed to elevate some, such as
    true admin commands (like policy changes, cmd, etc.)
    Additionally, it is not silent. It nags you every time it wakes up to tell
    you that UAC is turned off with a red shield and a tool tip balloon.
    Lastly, can't really test these programs for compatibility, installation and
    uninstall if I turn it off.

    The only benefit I see is that it leaves IE Protected mode on while turning
    UAC off.

    I don't have a real problem with UAC. I just hate to have to interface with
    a program that's dumber than me.
    Two viruses in 30 years is a good record for common sense and "running
    naked" without a loss in computer performance to all the protection schemes.
    Although I do use a firewall now... the default Windows version. Why Windows
    version? It's silent.
    (Make backups with an external hard drive and you can restore in 20 minutes.
    Much less troublesome than UAC.)
     
    Mark, Feb 26, 2008
    #13
  14. The silently elevate in the security policy does not. UAC is still on,
    it just silently elevates.

    Again, it's not turning it off, it's auto elevating it.
     
    Susan Bradley, Feb 26, 2008
    #14
  15. Julsie

    Paul Smith Guest

    That is utter nonsense. Why should applications have full access to the
    box?

    --
    Paul Smith,
    Yeovil, UK.
    Microsoft MVP Windows Shell/User.
    http://www.dasmirnov.net/blog/
    http://www.windowsresource.net/

    *Remove nospam. to reply by e-mail*
     
    Paul Smith, Feb 26, 2008
    #15
  16. Julsie

    Mark Guest

    http://technet2.microsoft.com/Windo...422c-b70e-b18ff918c2811033.mspx#BKMK_AdminUAC

    For the sake of having the facts straight, I just attempted both methods of
    setting UAC to No Prompts:
    Registry:
    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System]
    Change the value of ConsentPromptBehaviorAdmin from "2" to "0".
    This immediately results in the red shield and a balloon stating UAC has
    been turned off.
    Check security center: UAC is turned off.
    Attempt to install a cheap non-vista game: Program installs without a
    prompt.
    Allow computer to sleep: Nag upon return to life.
    Reboot: Nag upon return to life.
    Disabling nag prevents any security center issue from notifying you it
    is in trouble.

    Using secpol.msc to set UAC to No Prompts gave exact same results and
    amazingly set the same registry value to "0."

    Neither method produced a prompt when attempting to reset security
    settings if set for No Prompt.
    IE remained in Protected Mode for both cases.

    (I did not pursue all installed programs to seek those that were now
    confused and not functioning correctly as a result of switching UAC modes,
    but if UAC is still running, there should be no problems. It is actually
    disabling UAC that causes problems with these.)
     
    Mark, Feb 26, 2008
    #16
  17. Julsie

    Kayman Guest

    Your 'working brain' appears to be confused; UAC is much more then
    running/relying on anti-whatever things...do some reading and try to
    comprehend, Google is your friend ;-)
     
    Kayman, Feb 26, 2008
    #17
  18. Julsie

    benedito78 Guest

    ALL applications, especially malware should have full access to the box, if
    they don't, how will we get people to switch to Apple or Linux???? How will
    spammers get the message out? How will criminals get your bank logins?
    Curse you UAC!!!!

    -Lou
     
    benedito78, Feb 26, 2008
    #18
  19. Julsie

    Bob Guest

    Because it's MY box and I want to decide what has access to it. I don't want
    or need "big brother's" help.
    XP didn't need UAC and neither does Vista.
     
    Bob, Feb 26, 2008
    #19
  20. Julsie

    Bob Guest

    Thank you, but I've done my reading.

     
    Bob, Feb 26, 2008
    #20
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.