unlocking registration key

Discussion in 'Windows Vista Security' started by Lau, Jan 1, 2009.

  1. Lau

    Lau Guest

    With registration of a program that I got through internet I received a
    register key to make the use of the program possible. After clicking on it I
    got the message that Vista would not allow opening it since it extension .reg
    is considered a possible risk. I have been using the program with WindowsXP
    though without any problems. How do I unlock this key? I have tried the
    program Unlocker, but without succes.
     
    Lau, Jan 1, 2009
    #1
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  2. So, you obtained an illegal copy of a program and the reg hack to make it
    work is not functioning. Is that correct?

    No legally purchased program makes you hack the registry to enable the
    programs operation. All registry changes are taken care of during the
    install procedure.

    Maybe it is time you purchased the program.
     
    Richard Urban, Jan 1, 2009
    #2
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  3. Lau

    DevilsPGD Guest

    In message <> "Richard Urban"
    A swing and a miss, there are several out there that distribute a reg
    file to handle the registration.

    WinRAR is the most obvious I can think of.
     
    DevilsPGD, Jan 2, 2009
    #3
  4. In 20 years I have never run across a legitimate program distribution that
    was distributed as a WinRah file. Hacked programs (illegal) - yes!

    The programs I acquired (purchased) either had a setup.exe file that started
    the install where you put in the install key at the requested time, OR, I
    just unpacked the files into a folder of MY creation and ran the program
    (free - without any reg hack).

    I would certainly like a download link to one of the programs you are
    talking about so I can see for myself, if it isn't too much trouble.
     
    Richard Urban, Jan 2, 2009
    #4
  5. Lau

    Mick Murphy Guest

    A Registration Key for a Program will normally be obtained/sent to you by
    email.
    Then you copy and paste it into the Program.
    Vista accepts that.
     
    Mick Murphy, Jan 2, 2009
    #5
  6. Lau

    DevilsPGD Guest

    In message <> Lau
    You should be able to use the .reg file even though it's considered a
    security risk, but you'll need to authorize it to run as an
    administrator, as well as confirm that you trust the file.
     
    DevilsPGD, Jan 2, 2009
    #6
  7. Lau

    DevilsPGD Guest

    In message <> "Richard Urban"
    You misunderstand -- WinRAR was the example. http://www.rarlabs.com/

    Older versions came out with a .reg file, newer registrations come out
    with a .key file inside a specially coded .RAR, the key is actually a
    ..reg file internally, but WinRAR recognizes the .key version and
    attempts to register itself based on the specially coded .RAR.

    There is absolutely no way to enter any sort of registration code into
    the program directly, nor is the registered user release any different
    then the trial release (in other words, registered users grab the latest
    trial from the website to re-install or upgrade)

    Depending on your security settings and version, this self-registration
    based on a RAR'd .key file may or may not succeed as it's done on a
    per-machine basis rather then per-user basis.

    I had another package that was similar, some MP3 tagger back in the day
    when there weren't any decent open source solutions, although the
    company has long since gone under. I've still got the .reg file
    somewhere.

    I can't think of anything else, but I don't tend to register much
    commercial software, I prefer finding an open source alternative if
    possible or a free version then donating the cost of the commercial
    package to the O/S or free product instead.

    It's not particularly common, but it's not an automatic sign of
    something amiss.
     
    DevilsPGD, Jan 2, 2009
    #7
  8. Lau

    Sam Hobbs Guest

    You say "WinRAR recognizes"; in other words, registration is accomplished by
    executing WinRAR. The details of what is done internally is not important.
     
    Sam Hobbs, Jan 2, 2009
    #8
  9. Lau

    Lau Guest

    I receiced the .reg file in the regular way from the manufacturer of the
    software some 6 years ago. As told by this manufacturer, I just doubleclicked
    on the file and the the software could be used. I have done this again when I
    got a new machine with WindowsXP. Now I bought another PC, this time with
    Vista preinstalled on it. to which I want to transfer the software. But with
    Vista this turns out to be impossible. Vista just refuses to execute the .reg
    file since it considers it a threat. You said that this problem could be
    circumvented. But how can I do this?
     
    Lau, Jan 2, 2009
    #9
  10. Sorry I don't know a for sure answer, but have you tried opening the
    registry editor and importing the reg file?
     
    FromTheRafters, Jan 3, 2009
    #10
  11. Lau

    Lau Guest

    I have tried to read the content of the file by changing the extension by
    ..prn, but the content makes no sense for introducing something in regedit.
     
    Lau, Jan 3, 2009
    #11
  12. Lau

    Paul Adare Guest

    What is the actual extension of the file? If it is truly a .reg file then
    it will open in Notepad if you right-click it and choose open. Again, if it
    is a .reg file, the default action (noted in bold when you right-click it)
    will be Merge.
     
    Paul Adare, Jan 3, 2009
    #12
  13. Lau

    Lau Guest

    he actual extension is .reg. If I open it the way you said I keep getting the
    message from Vista that it will not open the file since it considers it
    unsafe.
     
    Lau, Jan 3, 2009
    #13

  14. Yes, that is the answer. Run regedit.exe as an administrator and
    import the .reg file.
     
    Blackstickman, Jan 3, 2009
    #14
  15. Lau

    Lau Guest

    Vista refuses to open the .reg file. It says that it considers it
    potentially dangerous. But I know for sure that it is not dangerous at all. I
    have used it for many years in WindowsXP without any problems. Vista seems to
    be made for dummies who do not know how to protect themselves against
    unwanted intruders.
    In order to get some idea on the content of the file I have changed the
    extension to .prn. The text that then appears is like
    "Key"="0lCz1kz1oiITB88gPE2mBMg+DkeHUH etc.. .To me this does not look like a
    text for the register. Or do you think it does? Where should it then be
    located in the register?
    I could ask the manufacturer of the software to get me a new registration
    key that will be accepted by Vista. But in some way I object to the way Vista
    is restricting the freedom of computer users. It considers us all dummies.
     
    Lau, Jan 3, 2009
    #15
  16. Lau

    DevilsPGD Guest

    In message <> "Sam Hobbs"
    If you buy a registration key today, then yes. My first purchase was
    just a .REG file that had to be manually installed, and this is still
    the copy I use right to this day.

    My second purchase is for my work machine, it included the newer
    specially coded RAR file which WinRAR recognizes -- However, this only
    works in some cases, not all, depending on your machine's security
    settings.
     
    DevilsPGD, Jan 3, 2009
    #16
  17. Lau

    DevilsPGD Guest

    In message <> Lau
    In my case, when I attempt to import a .reg I get a UAC prompt which I
    confirm, then a warning from regedit that the file might be harmful,
    which I also confirm, and at this point the changes are made.

    Another option might be to run "Regedit" first, then go to File -->
    Import, this might give some more useful clues.
     
    DevilsPGD, Jan 3, 2009
    #17
  18. Lau, does it still bring up the error message if you right click on it and
    select 'run as administrator' from the drop down list?

    --

    --
    John Barnett MVP
    Windows XP Associate Expert
    Windows Desktop Experience

    Web: http://xphelpandsupport.mvps.org
    Web: http://vistasupport.mvps.org
    Web: http://www.silversurfer-guide.com

    The information in this mail/post is supplied "as is". No warranty of any
    kind, either expressed or implied, is made in relation to the accuracy,
    reliability or content of this mail/post. The Author shall not be liable for
    any direct, indirect, incidental or consequential damages arising out of the
    use of, or inability to use, information or opinions expressed in this
    mail/post..
     
    John Barnett MVP, Jan 3, 2009
    #18

  19. Have you considered the very real possibility that the application in
    question simply isn't Vista-compatible, and that no amount of tinkering
    will make it work? What did the software manufacturer's technical
    support have to say when you asked them how to port their product to an
    OS for which it was not designed?


    And possibly that software, particularly if incompatible with Vista,
    would be a "threat" to the stability of a Vista system.


    If the File truly is a Vista-compatible registry file, simply open
    Regedit.exe with an administrative account, select File > Import, and
    select the desired *.reg file. (Mind you, if this isn't a
    Vista-compatible file, then you may do untold damage to your system; be
    sure to back up all of your data, as well as the the registry, and
    create a restore point before proceeding.)


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/555375

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. ~Benjamin Franklin

    Many people would rather die than think; in fact, most do. ~Bertrand Russell

    The philosopher has never killed any priests, whereas the priest has
    killed a great many philosophers.
    ~ Denis Diderot
     
    Bruce Chambers, Jan 3, 2009
    #19

  20. The fact that it worked on WinXP is absolutely *NO* reason to believe
    that it would work on Vista. They're two _different_ operating systems.


    Perhaps, but then, that is what exactly what the overwhelming majority
    of Microsoft's target customer base is.


    Who can say? If you'd simply open the file with a plain text editor,
    such as Notepad, as you've already been advised to do, someone should be
    able to help.


    While you're at it, why not ask them if their product is even
    Vista-compatible, to start with? (Had you taken this elementary and
    obvious step this first, you probably wouldn't have even had a problem
    to post, you know.)


    How does preventing the installation of incompatible and possibly
    damaging software "restrict the freedom of computer users?" If Vista
    had permitted the installation of potentially harmful software that then
    tanked your system, you'd just be whining that Microsoft doesn't do
    enough to protect your system and data.

    In this case, I'd have to say that you're proof of concept.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/555375

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. ~Benjamin Franklin

    Many people would rather die than think; in fact, most do. ~Bertrand Russell

    The philosopher has never killed any priests, whereas the priest has
    killed a great many philosophers.
    ~ Denis Diderot
     
    Bruce Chambers, Jan 3, 2009
    #20
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