VERY Disappointed with Vista

Discussion in 'Windows Vista General Discussion' started by Winnowill, Mar 6, 2007.

  1. Winnowill

    Winnowill Guest

    Hi everyone,

    I’m not a tech or anything, I’m probably pretty close to “an average PC
    userâ€. I do the internet, email, some online groups, do some artwork and/or
    photo work in Adobe Photo Shop, listen to music/watch movies, Pretty basic
    stuff. The most ‘intense’ game I do is MS Flight Sim 2000. Not exactly
    high-end gaming.

    My family had 3 PC networked together to share internet, a printer/scanner
    and exchange files and stuff. 2 PCs ran XP Home and 1 ran XP Pro.

    We decided to replace the older of the 2 XP Home PCs since it was over 10
    years old. But, we had to wait for our income tax refunds to do it, and by
    that time, about the only thing you could get was Vista. Vista sounded OK,
    but I wasn’t all that interested in it. All I really wanted was a higher
    performance PC, so last week we bought an HP Pavilion a1740n (2GB RAM, 1.9GHZ
    Intel processor and a 320GB HD). Of course, it came with Windows Vista Home
    Premium.

    A new PC is supposed to do things better, faster and easier as well as doing
    more things than the old PC you’re replacing. Unfortunately, it didn’t turn
    out that way. With Vista, I have had nothing but annoyance and aggravation
    since I got the new PC hooked up and turned on.

    I’m now looking at brand new PC that simply refuses to believe that it’s
    part of a network (even tho it has to go thru another PC to connect to the
    internet). I’m looking at brand new PC that won’t allow me to easily access
    the Hotmail email accounts that we’ve had for years. (I’m used to pushing one
    button on the keyboard and having all out email accounts open up in Outlook
    Express). I’m looking at a new PC that SAYS how easy it’s Transfer Wizard is,
    but then tells you that it only works for files and settings. Transferring
    programs requires you to download another program, which is currently only in
    the beta stage, and that is set up to do “over 100 of the most popular
    programsâ€. Wow. Big, fat, hairy deal! I wonder how many of those programs are
    one that I use?

    So, I found my way in here, looking for answers. I found them, but not the
    ones that I wanted to find. OK, I can PROBABLY get the network to work, if I
    go thru some really complicated sounding procedures. I may or may not be able
    to transfer my programs to Vista, and once there, they may or may not work
    right. (3rd PlanIt, which is a model railroad planning program that I copied
    to Vista with a little flash drive works just fine, except that the RR tracks
    float in the air, and the ballast that are supposed to be sitting on is
    missing.) And of course, we’ll no longer be able to do our email with one
    push of a button.

    With all that, I’m giving serious thought to just scrapping Vista and
    putting XP Home into the new PC. I’ve weighed the Pros and Cons of Vista, and
    come up with this:
    Cons:
    -MAYBE I can set up the home network, maybe not. If I can, it’ll take a lot
    of work.
    -I’ll go from very convenient to VERY inconvenient use of email, unless I
    want ads all over the place.
    -I might easily get my stuff into Vista I may not. Programs may or may not
    work (right).

    Pros:
    None that I’ve found yet.

    So, I’m writing this post for 2 reasons. First, I’d like to hear thoughts
    from people who know Vista about whether or not I should just switch to XP
    Home. Second, if the opinion is to use XP, then I’ll need step-by-step
    instructions for how to do it, and how to do it without loosing drivers and
    applications such as LightScribe for the DVD/CD/multi thingy drive, since HP
    doesn’t give you any disks with a new PC. Supposedly, all the apps and
    drivers and such are located in the D (Recovery) drive.

    So, what do you all think? Stay with Vista or scrap it and go to XP?

    Thanks everyone.
    Susan
     
    Winnowill, Mar 6, 2007
    #1
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  2. Winnowill

    BigJim Guest

    your not the only one
     
    BigJim, Mar 6, 2007
    #2
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  3. Winnowill

    Justin Guest

    If your saying Vista was the opposite of "better, faster and easier" then
    your 10 year old PC then you got a lemon! Take it back right now and go
    with someone else.
    We would have to know more about your network.
    Who setup outlook express for you? Get them to set up Windows Mail for you
    again. Your 10 year old XP PC (hum...) did not come pre installed with "all
    out email accounts open up in Outlook Express." If you want it configured
    that way then you need to configure it that way. We can help but you need
    to provide more info about your accounts.
    It sounds like you don't really have a need for Vista. Honestly, it sounds
    like changing OSs (right now) will be too much for you to handle. No
    biggie! Maybe you can order online from Dell and buy a machine with XP
    installed. I believe they still allow you to opt for or against the Vista
    upgrade.
     
    Justin, Mar 6, 2007
    #3
  4. Winnowill

    nick Guest

    so you are of no help at all and just want to say that vista is good,
    and he doesn't know how to use it or his computer is bad.

    The more I read you posts the more trollish you sound..

    If you are such a hotshot help him with the information he gives bozo brain.

    But you cant because you know nothing about computers.. you only like to
    whine
    that vista is good. Go somewhere else to troll, loser.
     
    nick, Mar 6, 2007
    #4
  5. Winnowill

    Syspepr Guest

    I just installed a fresh copy of Vista Ultimate x64 on my home PC. As an IT
    professional with years of experience in windows OSes, I can truly say that
    this hasn't been the best experience I've ever had. The installation is long
    and painful and certainly doesn't seem to provide as many installation
    options at Windows XP. I prefer my HDD with a minimum of two partitions--one
    for the OS and apps, and one for my data. In XP, all your documents (i.e.
    word, excel, etc.) will be saved in one very convenient folder called My
    Documents--very aptly named and easy to manipulate. With Vista, you get a
    folder named for your profile and under this one folder are a subset of
    various other folders--complicated, confusing, and downright insidious. In
    order to change the location for this sub-folders, you apparently, must
    select them all one by one and type in the drive partition to which you want
    them to default. Sigh, in XP all you had to do was right click on My
    Documents and change the default drive path and it would automatically move
    all subfolders beneath it to the desired location.

    I'm also not at all fond of the method used to navigate between files and
    folders--far, far too complicated. They missed the boat entirely on this
    release. Instead of simplifying they over-complicated. I suppose we'll all
    be forced to get used to it but, I'll be keeping an XP machine around for a
    couple of years to come. I'm far more productive using a system with me and
    not AGAINST me.
     
    Syspepr, Mar 6, 2007
    #5
  6. Winnowill

    Good News! Guest

    So install XP, you must have a spare license now you've decommissioned your
    old PC....

    Vista is new, there will be problems. XP was the same as was Windows 3.1 all
    those many years ago!!

    : Hi everyone,
    :
    : I'm not a tech or anything, I'm probably pretty close to "an average PC
    : user". I do the internet, email, some online groups, do some artwork
    and/or
    : photo work in Adobe Photo Shop, listen to music/watch movies, Pretty basic
    : stuff. The most 'intense' game I do is MS Flight Sim 2000. Not exactly
    : high-end gaming.
    :
    : My family had 3 PC networked together to share internet, a printer/scanner
    : and exchange files and stuff. 2 PCs ran XP Home and 1 ran XP Pro.
    :
    : We decided to replace the older of the 2 XP Home PCs since it was over 10
    : years old. But, we had to wait for our income tax refunds to do it, and by
    : that time, about the only thing you could get was Vista. Vista sounded OK,
    : but I wasn't all that interested in it. All I really wanted was a higher
    : performance PC, so last week we bought an HP Pavilion a1740n (2GB RAM,
    1.9GHZ
    : Intel processor and a 320GB HD). Of course, it came with Windows Vista
    Home
    : Premium.
    :
    : A new PC is supposed to do things better, faster and easier as well as
    doing
    : more things than the old PC you're replacing. Unfortunately, it didn't
    turn
    : out that way. With Vista, I have had nothing but annoyance and aggravation
    : since I got the new PC hooked up and turned on.
    :
    : I'm now looking at brand new PC that simply refuses to believe that it's
    : part of a network (even tho it has to go thru another PC to connect to the
    : internet). I'm looking at brand new PC that won't allow me to easily
    access
    : the Hotmail email accounts that we've had for years. (I'm used to pushing
    one
    : button on the keyboard and having all out email accounts open up in
    Outlook
    : Express). I'm looking at a new PC that SAYS how easy it's Transfer Wizard
    is,
    : but then tells you that it only works for files and settings. Transferring
    : programs requires you to download another program, which is currently only
    in
    : the beta stage, and that is set up to do "over 100 of the most popular
    : programs". Wow. Big, fat, hairy deal! I wonder how many of those programs
    are
    : one that I use?
    :
    : So, I found my way in here, looking for answers. I found them, but not the
    : ones that I wanted to find. OK, I can PROBABLY get the network to work, if
    I
    : go thru some really complicated sounding procedures. I may or may not be
    able
    : to transfer my programs to Vista, and once there, they may or may not work
    : right. (3rd PlanIt, which is a model railroad planning program that I
    copied
    : to Vista with a little flash drive works just fine, except that the RR
    tracks
    : float in the air, and the ballast that are supposed to be sitting on is
    : missing.) And of course, we'll no longer be able to do our email with one
    : push of a button.
    :
    : With all that, I'm giving serious thought to just scrapping Vista and
    : putting XP Home into the new PC. I've weighed the Pros and Cons of Vista,
    and
    : come up with this:
    : Cons:
    : -MAYBE I can set up the home network, maybe not. If I can, it'll take a
    lot
    : of work.
    : -I'll go from very convenient to VERY inconvenient use of email, unless I
    : want ads all over the place.
    : -I might easily get my stuff into Vista I may not. Programs may or may not
    : work (right).
    :
    : Pros:
    : None that I've found yet.
    :
    : So, I'm writing this post for 2 reasons. First, I'd like to hear thoughts
    : from people who know Vista about whether or not I should just switch to XP
    : Home. Second, if the opinion is to use XP, then I'll need step-by-step
    : instructions for how to do it, and how to do it without loosing drivers
    and
    : applications such as LightScribe for the DVD/CD/multi thingy drive, since
    HP
    : doesn't give you any disks with a new PC. Supposedly, all the apps and
    : drivers and such are located in the D (Recovery) drive.
    :
    : So, what do you all think? Stay with Vista or scrap it and go to XP?
    :
    : Thanks everyone.
    : Susan
    :
     
    Good News!, Mar 6, 2007
    #6
  7. Winnowill

    keiron99 Guest

    I, too, am an average user. I got a new PC - lesser spec than yours it
    seems - and Vista. And I can tell you it is much faster. And the more
    you use it, the faster it gets. I gather that Vista learns how you use
    your PC, what programs and files you use the most, and keeps them
    ready and waiting for you.

    It's also much, much easier. If you've been using XP for years, you
    are probably just stuck in the groove of doing things the XP way. The
    Search and Help features are infinitely better than anything that has
    gone before.

    I could put a huge list together of pros for me - faster, easier, I
    feel much more comfortable letting the kids use it, much more fun and
    looks better (some may sneer at the last two, but anything that makes
    life in front of a pc a bit more pleasurable is fine by me).

    If your only problems are setting up a network (I did it without using
    any instructions, maybe I got lucky) and not being able to press a
    particular button to open your emails (I'm sure this can be sorted),
    then you really should find some better things in life to worry about!

    Give it a couple of weeks, resolve those minor issues, and you'll
    never go back.
     
    keiron99, Mar 6, 2007
    #7
  8. Winnowill

    SysAdminTH Guest

    Winnowill
    I had prepared the post below with almost the same heading but you beat
    me to it, thought I would still post here instead of a new thread as the
    theme is the same.
    Steve

    Vista A Disappointing Experience

    System Specs
    Gigabyte GA81945P-Pro
    Intel 805D Dual Core 2.66 GHz
    2GB DDR II 667Mhz RAM
    ATI Radion X1950 Pro 256 MB
    Realtek gb LAN
    Broardcom 1gb LAN
    1 * Seagate 320GB HDD
    2 * Seagate 250GB HDD
    1 * Seagate 200GB HDD
    2 * Seagate 120GB HDD
    Lite-On Multi DVD/CD Writer
    2 * LG Flatron 17†Widescreen Digital LCD Monitors

    I did not know quite what to expect when I install Windows Vista
    Ultimate but 6 weeks of daily usage for work and entertainment purposes
    leaves me wondering when the benefits of moving from XP will kick-in
    (notice I said moving to XP not upgrading). I have a lot of respect
    for many of Microsoft’s innovations and I have been using their products
    since the mid-eighties and make a good living selling and supporting MS
    based solutions, I have no axe to grind with them.

    Installing
    I first attempted to upgrade from XP to Vista and followed all the
    correct procedures however everything was terribly slow and the system
    was generally unhappy so I bit the bullet and did a clean install. This
    time things went much better although the install routine was quite time
    consuming.

    3rd Party Driver Support
    After the basic system was up and running I needed to get my dual
    monitor setup up and running with the latest drivers from ATI. In XP
    adding removing additional monitors was a breeze and I was able to
    hotswap monitors with no problem, I cannot currently do this in Vista
    which needs a reboot and fiddle about with the ATI control panel.
    Microsoft and ATI should have worked this out before releasing this product.

    I next connected my HP Photosmart 7960 which was recognized but no
    specific Windows drivers were available. HP does not have a Vista driver
    for this model either I ended up having to us a Microsoft driver for the
    7800 series. Once again Microsoft and HP should have worked this out.

    Next on the list was getting my HTC Universal and HTC Artemis WM5 phones
    synced to my PC, I downloaded the Windows Mobile Device Center beta
    (all that was available at the time) which would allow me to copy files
    but would not automatically detect either devices for syncing until I
    double clicked the device in WMDC. Now been fixed but should have been
    ready at official release.

    Networking
    Was able to connect to and join my domain fairly easily and setup a
    couple of VPN connections without too much trouble so no complaints on
    this one.

    As to the design layout and work flow of networking in Vista IMHO it is
    a step backwards, I work with many different network connections on a
    daily basis and there are far too many mouse clicks and panes to get
    through to do the simplest of tasks. i.e The consolidated network
    connection icon now means additional steps to disconnect or view status
    and it is not possible to see at a glance what connections are active
    which might have been inadvertently left open.

    Aero Interface
    In general I like the look and feel of the Aero Interface but every time
    a UAC confirmation pop up or a media player other than Microsoft’s own
    is used my screen flashes black while the mode is reset. This is very
    distracting and feels like Aero is still in the experimental stages of
    development.

    File Explorer
    File Explorer is possibly the biggest regression of any Windows feature
    ever. Just opening a local folder can take 40 seconds while Explorer
    scans it’s contents. I had to disable thumbnail viewing due to the
    fact that displaying them would cause Explorer to hang, so as a keen
    digital photographer this is a big drawback.

    The biggest fault is in file moving/copying where it just hangs for ages
    calculating transfer time before actually doing anything. File transfer
    from the command prompt works like a fine.

    The breadcrumbs in the address bar are fine for those who want to use
    them but why take away the UP level button? Surely it’s easier just to
    click UP until you get where you’re going than to have to read and
    process what could be a long complicated bread crumbed folder path, it
    definitely makes navigation more tedious for me.

    Terminal Services Remote Desktop
    I used to be able to enter an IP address or computer name, username,
    password and domain to make a connection to a remote server this can no
    longer be done in Vista’s remote desktop. Remote Desktop tries to work
    out what I should be entering and gives me no option to edit the domain.
    So I then have to wait for the login failure and enter login details
    manually.

    UAC
    This really is a mixed blessing and leaving the flashing black screen
    issue apart UAC is a good idea in principle but in practice I see the
    UAC half a dozen times a day or more, how long will it be before myself
    and many other users become so inured to this that we just click
    continue by force of habit? UAC needs some intelligence to be really
    useful.

    Games
    Only playing Medieval Total War at the moment but works the same as on XP.

    Conclusion
    I have to say the whole experience has been disappointing, nothing
    disastrous but I was not expecting to see my productivity decrease with
    no discernable benefits. Even after so many years of development Vista
    is not ready to persuade me that it holds real benefits for me or my
    customers over Windows XP. I can see it will be useful to those who
    never learned to browse safely and protect their PC but it’s a hard sell
    for the rest of us. The transition from Windows 98 to Windows 2000 was
    of a real, tangible, cost justifiable benefit and moving to XP was
    painless but less beneficial however I worry about Vista because I can’t
    see the point of it, yes I know it’s more secure but that is not enough
    for a major version release, rather than thinking up new names for old
    features I would have preferred some real innovation apart from a 3d
    interface.

    I hope there is a mother of a service pack in the wings which will at
    least get me back to XP functionality.
     
    SysAdminTH, Mar 6, 2007
    #8
  9. Winnowill

    CJM Guest

    Essentially that is correct. All the problems that were mentioned are not
    problems with Vista. It's the OPs lack of understanding about Vista.
    Hmmm... me think your are trolling.
    How can somebody 'whine' that something is good?
    Right back at yer....
     
    CJM, Mar 6, 2007
    #9
  10. Winnowill

    CJM Guest

    Depends if he had a valid retail licence or not. You can't transfer OEM
    licences like that.
    Indeed.
     
    CJM, Mar 6, 2007
    #10
  11. Winnowill

    CJM Guest

    Vista is apparently much quicker to install (on average) than XP. In my
    personal experience it was a bit quicker, but more importantly, it was a lot
    more intelligent - it just got on with the job.
    Graphics and sound drivers are probably the biggest problem area at the
    moment. This will change weekly as the manufacturers gradually get their act
    together.
    Once again it's HP's fault I'm afraid.
    ad infinitum.
    It's better for novices, but I agree, it's a few clicks extra that pros
    could do without.
    You can disable that secure desktop feature-thingy in the policy editor. You
    can disable UAC as well if you wish.
    Haven't had this problem at all. In fact, IMHO it's faster than XP.
    This seems to be a common complaint. I'm not sure if it's slower or if it
    simply seems slower.
    Agreed. Disable the Up button by default but leave it in surely?

    It's much slower to navigate because you have to take care to hit the right
    folder with your mouse to go up to the right level. The Up button was always
    the same size and in the same place.
    Not experience this. RDC works fine for me.
    It's an annoying PITA. I agree with the principle but not with the
    implementation. It should be a more configurable experience.
    I disagree, but at least it's a reasoned appraisal rather than 'VI$ta
    $ukks...meh!'

    I think Vista is great. It's so much more enjoyable to use - I'm tired of XP
    now. There is no killer feature that would encourage enterprises to upgrade
    en masse, but I think it would be reasonable for them to start using Vista
    on new machines.
    Q3 2007 apparently.
     
    CJM, Mar 6, 2007
    #11
  12. Winnowill

    Alias Guest

    What can Vista do that XP can't do that would justify the high cost of
    Vista and the hardware one needs to buy to install it?

    Alias
     
    Alias, Mar 6, 2007
    #12
  13. One networking issue got me puzzled for ages. The default workgroup name is
    different in Vista than it is in XP. If you don't change the workgroup name
    on your new Vista machine to match the other machines on the network all
    sorts of weird things happen.

    Specifically, networking seems to work, but it takes ages (several minutes)
    to see the other machines. And for some reason they come and go.

    I could understand it if it either worked or didn't work, but this half-way
    business had me messing about for ages.

    Thack
     
    Steve Thackery, Mar 6, 2007
    #13
  14. Winnowill

    SysAdminTH Guest

    CJM

    Thanks for your comments however I disagree that drivers are not
    Microsoft's problem, a company like Microsoft can make things happen and
    partners with hardware vendors and for the good of the customer should
    have made more effort to ensure that the major peripherals suppliers and
    chipsets were onboard at launch.

    MS makes WM5 and Vista so the 'ad infinitum' was not relevant it was not
    a hardware issue but a WM5/Vista problem.

    File Explorer operations are measurably slower.

    I suppose I don't really get what Vista is for, after the shiny new Aero
    interface wears off what's left that XP doesn't deliver faster and more
    efficiently?
     
    SysAdminTH, Mar 6, 2007
    #14
  15. Winnowill

    Paul-B Guest

    This has puzzled me for a long time. Whilst not being able to boast
    (unlike some of the posters here) that I have a client-base running
    into the tens of thousands of servers/workstations, my own client base,
    of local sme's, covers a radius of up to 50 miles from Oxford, and the
    total number of servers/workstations I look after probably runs to 300
    plus.

    I cannot think of a single reason why any one of them should upgrade to
    Vista over the current mix of XP and 2K currently being used. There are
    no advantages to be gained, rather the opposite, given the number of
    problems which Vista brings with it.

    Every PC I supply and maintain has and will continue to have XP Pro as
    a working o/s (except the few I'm currently supplying which are running
    Linux).

    Maybe after Vista SP1 comes along that may change, but I see no reason
    why any of my clients, who use their computers as an integral part of
    their businesses and therefore cannot afford unnecessary downtime,
    should consider using Vista.

    And before anone says I have no experience of it, I am running Vista on
    one of the PC's on my network, not because I want to but because I have
    to. And it's still not a patch on XP Pro.
     
    Paul-B, Mar 6, 2007
    #15

  16. Being a an IT professional with years of experience in windows OSes, I am
    surprised you don't find the new user shell folders to be an improvement,
    for you personally. I have a lot of gripes about Vista, especially its
    current state, but that is one of the definite improvements IMO.

    ss.
     
    Synapse Syndrome, Mar 6, 2007
    #16
  17. Winnowill

    jerry Guest

    In other words, if you don't have a sufficient understanding of VISTA, you
    should opt out? It seems to me that that applies to 99% of all computer
    users since VISA is brand new and 100% of users who are non-geek consumers.
    If it ain't easy to use by the lowly masses, then it is a problem with the
    OS. In this day and age, we should expect the OS to become more and more
    invisibile to the end user.
     
    jerry, Mar 6, 2007
    #17
  18. Winnowill

    keiron99 Guest

    I was amazed at how quick and easy installation was. Much much better
    than XP. And for most of us (non pros) it's a once in five years
    thing. I also understood what I was doing with Vista, the instructions
    on screen are much clearer.
    product.

    Something's wrong there. I've set Vista up on my own PC and a couple
    of mates - we don't experience this.

    Again, this is not my experience. With my PC (old AMD dual core, 1 gb
    RAM), it's lightning fast, and the more you access a file, the quicker
    it is to load in future. (I think this is "Superfetch" in operation?)

    Again, I just don't experience this at all. And I've been moving
    hundreds of gb around setting up my new PC.
    I suppose they could have left UP in as well, but for me, this is one
    of the best innovations - it's just so easy to see where you are at
    any time. Whatsmore, with UP you had to click through it several times
    if you wanted to go up a few levels - now it's just a single click.
    I agree, noone ever reads the small print! I guess you can switch it
    off though and you can understand why MS included it to be fair..

    If I had Vista at work, rather than just at home, my productivity
    would massively increase. Finding folders and files and managing them
    is just so much easier. For me, probably the single best feature is
    the Details Pane and Preview Pane. Simply brilliant features.

    I think a lot of people who've adopted or been exposed to Vista early
    are IT enthusiasts and pros. These people are comfortable getting
    "under the bonnet" and rather enjoy that. Vista, it seems to me, has
    the end user very much in mind and on that score I think it's a
    resounding success. It's quicker, dead easy to find things, apparently
    a lot more secure (I'm certainly more comfortable letting my 10 year
    old on), easier to configure and - not to be sniffed at - looks a
    whole lot better.
     
    keiron99, Mar 6, 2007
    #18
  19. Winnowill

    CJM Guest

    There are lots of problems in all walks of life. You can't just bleat about
    them and then give up.

    If the OP thinks he can do better with XP or Linux then he should install
    it. But he/she will still have problems because they lack the objectiveness
    and the cool head to solve problems and learn new things. If they can't get
    simple things like workgroup network sorted in Vista they will have no
    chance in XP.

    Blaming Vista for problems that are more likely to be non-Vista problems
    won't get you anywhere. Vista is far from perfect but it's the best
    out-of-the-box OS I've ever seen - providing you have supported hardware.
    There are plenty of design decisions I disagree with, but the pale into
    insignificance compared to all of the things they have got right.

    The people whining about Vista now will be the same people whining about
    Vista+1 in 3-5yrs time.

    The vast majority of people are impressed by the power and speed of Vista.
    The OP isn't however. But instead of looking at the empirical evidence, they
    knee-jerk to the assumption that Vista is at fault rather than HP for
    delivering a poorly configured machine.

    Speaking of which... the last desktop processor from intel rated at 1.9GHz
    was the Pentium 4 back in 2001. Have they bought a 6 year old machine? That
    would explain the slow speed.

    But no, what they actually have is a 1.83GHz Core 2 Duo E6300. Overlooking
    the OPs error, we can see that they have one of the fasters processors on
    sale. I bet there are dozens of people on this NG with the same CPU, yet
    none of them will complain about it being slow in Vista - which again
    suggests that the problem lies with the OP's HP machine.

    The bottom line is that lack of knowledge and lack of nous in the user does
    not make Vista a bad OS.
     
    CJM, Mar 6, 2007
    #19
  20. Winnowill

    CJM Guest

    It's funny you quoted that section...

    My response is.. 'There is no killer feature that would encourage
    enterprises to upgrade en masse, but I think it would be reasonable for them
    to start using Vista on new machines.'
     
    CJM, Mar 6, 2007
    #20
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