very very slow network - sometimes

Discussion in 'Windows Vista Networking' started by A.Translator, Nov 11, 2007.

  1. A.Translator

    A.Translator Guest

    I have a small cabled network with three XP machines and one Vista Home Premium
    laptop. Internet is no problem. The XP machines have no problem seeing Vista's
    shared files. But the Vista laptop somtimes takes ages before it sees the XP
    machines, sometimes it is almost immediate. That bugs me: there is no
    consistency. With exactly the same settings Vista will sometimes take up to
    half an hour (!) to see the XP machines and sometimes "only" minutes (once
    Vista sees the XP boxes, it can drag files and things over normally).

    Any ideas how to remedy this?
     
    A.Translator, Nov 11, 2007
    #1
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  2. A.Translator

    Chuck [MVP] Guest

    Adriana,

    What exactly are you doing when you measure this mysterious time before one
    computer "sees" the other? What do you do to change things, after that time,
    until the next time? Are you turning computers off (which computers?), are you
    rebooting computers (which computers?), do you log off computers (which
    computers?)?

    Where does the Vista computer "see" the XP computer? The Network window, or the
    Network Map? These are 2 different things.

    There are a number of issues which computers running Windows Vista can introduce
    into a network.
    <http://nitecruzr.blogspot.com/2006/12/windows-xp-and-vista-on-lan-together.html>
    http://nitecruzr.blogspot.com/2006/12/windows-xp-and-vista-on-lan-together.html

    The RWin Auto Tuning problem seems to affect local connections.
    <http://nitecruzr.blogspot.com/2007/06/autotuning-in-vista-maybe-not-ready-for.html>
    http://nitecruzr.blogspot.com/2007/06/autotuning-in-vista-maybe-not-ready-for.html

    And look at your protocol stack.
    <http://nitecruzr.blogspot.com/2005/05/fix-network-problems-but-clean-up.html>
    http://nitecruzr.blogspot.com/2005/05/fix-network-problems-but-clean-up.html

    Finally, look at the network setup as a whole. Compare logs from "browstat
    status", "ipconfig /all", "net config server", and "net config workstation",
    from each computer. Read this article, and linked articles, and follow
    instructions precisely (download browstat!) (note how to use the command window
    in Vista):
    <http://nitecruzr.blogspot.com/2005/05/troubleshooting-network-neighborhood.html#AskingForHelp>
    http://nitecruzr.blogspot.com/2005/05/troubleshooting-network-neighborhood.html#AskingForHelp

    --
    Cheers,
    Chuck, MS-MVP 2005-2007 [Windows - Networking]
    http://nitecruzr.blogspot.com/
    Paranoia is not a problem, when it's a normal response from experience.
    My email is AT DOT
    actual address pchuck mvps org.
     
    Chuck [MVP], Nov 11, 2007
    #2
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  3. A.Translator

    A.Translator Guest

    Wow, that is a ton of information, lots of it way above my head, but I will
    look into it. Thank you.

    As I said, though: once it works, it works without a glitch, so I must be doing
    something right.
    I am not a native English speaker, but thought that computers in networks saw
    each other, ie recognised each other's existence and allowing each other to
    transport files back and forth. Any way, that is what I mean by "seeing".
    Once the network works, there is no time lap. The minutes-long wait occurs
    after switching off the Vista machine. When restarting that one, the network is
    sometimes accesible after several seconds or minutes, sometimes indeed only
    after half an hour. I have been trying to find out if things get sped up by my
    actively using the Vista machine, in stead of just staring at it. So far I
    haven't noticed any difference (but I have no professional bench mark
    instruments) with lots or less activity. I can't keep on looking at the
    Network window (or folder, I mean the one that pops up after clicking "network"
    in de Menu Start) so I do turn my attention to other things on the Vista.
    Internet, Word, that sort of thing. And then, sometimes, when I go back to
    Network, lo and behold the other computers are there. But sometimes they are
    still invisible.

    I am in the process of transporting files and settings from my Windows Desktop
    to my Vista Laptop, so I do get to look in Network quite often.
     
    A.Translator, Nov 11, 2007
    #3
  4. A.Translator

    Chuck [MVP] Guest

    Read it as best you can, and ask questions. Writing about it from scratch is
    not something I try to do frequently. Most of it I wrote to explain the details
    to myself, so I sympathise with you when you say "way above my head", because it
    feels that way to me too sometimes. There are an almost infinite amount of
    details, that make YOUR network work the way YOU want it to (when you get them
    right of course).

    There's no magical, built-in ability of "computers in networks to see each
    other". What YOU observe in My Network Places ("Network" in Vista) is the
    output of a painfully complex subsystem known as the NT Browser (please don't
    confuse this with Internet Explorer etc). The browser is a peer-peer resource
    enumeration facility. I think this article is a bit lighter on technical
    detail.
    <http://nitecruzr.blogspot.com/2005/04/nt-browser-or-why-cant-i-always-see.html>
    http://nitecruzr.blogspot.com/2005/04/nt-browser-or-why-cant-i-always-see.html

    I really like the RWin Auto Tuning issue right now, as one factor in your
    problem. If that's not a possible improvement, then run the logs I suggest and
    we'll peruse them. But give the article above a read too, as it is the core of
    your symptoms.

    --
    Cheers,
    Chuck, MS-MVP 2005-2007 [Windows - Networking]
    http://nitecruzr.blogspot.com/
    Paranoia is not a problem, when it's a normal response from experience.
    My email is AT DOT
    actual address pchuck mvps org.
     
    Chuck [MVP], Nov 12, 2007
    #4
  5. A.Translator

    A.Translator Guest

    Chuck [MVP] schreef op 12-11-2007
    I will try the logs once I got my nerve back:
    just went into the command prompt in Vista and typed:
    netsh interface tcp set global autotuning=disabled {enter}

    (it was never the Internet that wasn't accessible, just my local network)

    then restarted and tried again: no improvements in network speed.
    By then I was sweating heavily and feeling very nervous so I thought I'd turn
    this autotuning back on by typing in the command window:

    netsh interface tcp set global autotuning=enabled {enter}

    On which Windows responed: cannot execute command, incorrect parameter. (or
    words to that effect; my Windows speaks Dutch).

    So how do I get things back to where they were?

    I think I'd rather put up with the long wait before I can get files from other
    computers in the network than go trough this nerve wracking experience again.

    Hey, wait! Just restarted the Vista laptop again, after (unsuccesfully) trying
    to re-enable autotuning, and the whole network is instantly visible and
    accesible! Was the autotuning the cause after all? Do I have to go and look for
    a new modem/router now?

    Just tried again and restarted the Vista laptop: back to the old situation,
    network not yet visible. Does the command only work the once? One 'session'? Is
    that why I couldn't / shouldn't try to turn autotuning back on?

    Thanks a lot for your patience and information.
     
    A.Translator, Nov 12, 2007
    #5
  6. A.Translator

    A.Translator Guest

    A.Translator schreef op 12-11-2007
    Should this have been
    netsh interface tcp set global autotuning=normal?
     
    A.Translator, Nov 12, 2007
    #6
  7. netsh int tcp set global autotuninglevel=enabled
     
    Jeffrey Randow, Nov 13, 2007
    #7
  8. A.Translator

    Chuck [MVP] Guest

    I don't think anybody knows what Microsoft did with this one.

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/934430

    Manually determine whether Windows Scaling is being handled incorrectly by the
    firewall device. To do this, follow these steps:
    1. Click Start button, click All Programs, click Accessories, and then
    click Command Prompt.
    2. At the command prompt, type the following command, and then press ENTER:
    netsh interface tcp set global autotuninglevel=disabled
    This command disables the Receive Window Auto-Tuning feature.
    3. Try to make a non-HTTP network connection.

    Note If the connectivity problem is resolved, contact the manufacturer of the
    firewall device for steps to correct the issue.
    4. At a command prompt, type the following command, and then press ENTER:
    netsh interface tcp set global autotuninglevel=normal
    This command enables Receive Window Auto-Tuning again so that you can take
    advantage of the increase in network throughput performance that this option
    provides

    --
    Cheers,
    Chuck, MS-MVP 2005-2007 [Windows - Networking]
    http://nitecruzr.blogspot.com/
    Paranoia is not a problem, when it's a normal response from experience.
    My email is AT DOT
    actual address pchuck mvps org.
     
    Chuck [MVP], Nov 13, 2007
    #8
  9. A.Translator

    Chuck [MVP] Guest

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/934430

    Manually determine whether Windows Scaling is being handled incorrectly by the
    firewall device. To do this, follow these steps:
    1. Click Start button, click All Programs, click Accessories, and then
    click Command Prompt.
    2. At the command prompt, type the following command, and then press ENTER:
    netsh interface tcp set global autotuninglevel=disabled
    This command disables the Receive Window Auto-Tuning feature.
    3. Try to make a non-HTTP network connection.

    Note If the connectivity problem is resolved, contact the manufacturer of the
    firewall device for steps to correct the issue.
    4. At a command prompt, type the following command, and then press ENTER:
    netsh interface tcp set global autotuninglevel=normal
    This command enables Receive Window Auto-Tuning again so that you can take
    advantage of the increase in network throughput performance that this option
    provides

    --
    Cheers,
    Chuck, MS-MVP 2005-2007 [Windows - Networking]
    http://nitecruzr.blogspot.com/
    Paranoia is not a problem, when it's a normal response from experience.
    My email is AT DOT
    actual address pchuck mvps org.
     
    Chuck [MVP], Nov 13, 2007
    #9
  10. A.Translator

    A.Translator Guest

    Chuck [MVP] schreef op 13-11-2007
    I did all that, and performance seems improved (i.e. the XP-machines show up
    within seconds/minutes on the Vista-machine now - nothing like the half hour I
    had to wait before), but in fact nothing has changed, since I put auto-tuning
    back to normal. Baffling, but I am happy and grateful for your help.
     
    A.Translator, Nov 13, 2007
    #10
  11. A.Translator

    A.Translator Guest

    A.Translator schreef op 13-11-2007
    That was yeasterday evening. This morning I am still waiting, after more than
    half an hour. I guess I will have to look into getting a new router (mine is
    indeed pretty ancient)
     
    A.Translator, Nov 13, 2007
    #11
  12. I know what you mean. There are two different autotuning netsh
    scripts - one autotuning and one autotuninglevel...
     
    Jeffrey Randow, Nov 14, 2007
    #12
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