Vista And Ram

Discussion in 'Windows Vista Performance' started by lofty73, Apr 29, 2007.

  1. lofty73

    Rock Guest


    That has nothing to do with unused RAM sitting around doing nothing versus
    taking that same RAM and populating it with data. You're analogy doesn't
    apply.
     
    Rock, Apr 30, 2007
    #21
    1. Advertisements

  2. lofty73

    Julian Guest


    Whoever wrote it up on Wiki wasn't that impressed...
    "The performance improvement seen by using this idea is questionable [1]. In
    the cases where a system has 512MB of RAM (the bare minimum for Windows
    Vista - not advisable), the largest gains are 7%. However, on systems with
    1GB or more, Readyboost has a negligible effect (small enough to be
    experimental error)."
     
    Julian, Apr 30, 2007
    #22
    1. Advertisements

  3. lofty73

    Julian Guest

    'k
     
    Julian, Apr 30, 2007
    #23
  4. lofty73

    DanR Guest

    Well, if page files are slower then RAM but not so slow that this user would
    notice the difference than why have more than ½GB of RAM. Just let the
    memory swap places continuously. We all know that's not a good idea. So I
    wonder if Vista (Windows in general) is wise enough to just let go of
    certain data in memory when new bits are asking to get in.
     
    DanR, Apr 30, 2007
    #24
  5. lofty73

    Pete Russell Guest

    "So I wonder if Vista (Windows in general) is wise enough to just let go of
    data in memory when new bits are asking to get in."

    Yes it is, Does a good job at it. I run alibre design 3d cad on vista and it
    has no problems.
     
    Pete Russell, Apr 30, 2007
    #25
  6. lofty73

    Lord Takyon Guest


    For what exactly? Your running progs get as much as they need, the rest is
    basically filled up with stuff you regularly use, so if you launch any of
    these apps they start quicker.

    Trust me, it does help. It is a bit weird trying to work in that manner,
    especially after years of trying to keep RAM clear. If a running app wants
    more memory then some if this cached stuff is dumped almost instantly and
    the space is given to the running app that wants it.

    That is how I understand it at a basic level, I am sure someone here will
    correct me if I am wrong.
     
    Lord Takyon, Apr 30, 2007
    #26
  7. lofty73

    Lord Takyon Guest


    Your argument is flawed my friend. You need to get a better understanding
    of how it works.
     
    Lord Takyon, Apr 30, 2007
    #27
  8. lofty73

    Lord Takyon Guest


    I experimented with Ready Boost, no difference for me. However my brother
    does notice a difference with it, very strange. Very possibly tied to both
    the actual machine AND the users usage.
     
    Lord Takyon, Apr 30, 2007
    #28
  9. lofty73

    Lord Takyon Guest


    I currently run a 1Gig system, but I only use 34% once it has booted and
    settled down. You need to look at what crap is running in the background.
     
    Lord Takyon, Apr 30, 2007
    #29
  10. lofty73

    Lord Takyon Guest


    I have to say it was weird at first seeing all my RAM used all the time, but
    this system does run well. It previously had XP on, and the usage speed of
    Vista is just as fast as XP ever was, but I get the added bonus of it seems
    so much smoother, everything opens fast and runs well, practically no
    bottlenecks and slowing of this machine, and trust me, my machines work
    hard.
     
    Lord Takyon, Apr 30, 2007
    #30
  11. lofty73

    Conor Guest

    You can't. A great deal of that memory is used by Prefetching and is
    released as soon as its needed.
     
    Conor, Apr 30, 2007
    #31
  12. lofty73

    Conor Guest

    It is being used.
     
    Conor, Apr 30, 2007
    #32
  13. lofty73

    Julian Guest

    That's a stroke of luck... I'm here to learn.
    (Thus, must err.)
     
    Julian, Apr 30, 2007
    #33
  14. lofty73

    Pete Russell Guest

    Yes, From what I make of it. If you have a consistent pattern of system
    usage it will spoeed it up more for you because the superfetch will be able
    to clearly tell what programs you are going to use and offload them to the
    readyboost instead of the hard drive. Also if you have a slow HD as in a
    laptop you will likely see a larger difference that someone running a high
    speed disk on a desktop.


     
    Pete Russell, Apr 30, 2007
    #34
  15. lofty73

    Pete Russell Guest

    It is now called superfetch and the system cache. :) just FYI
     
    Pete Russell, Apr 30, 2007
    #35
  16. lofty73

    Conor Guest

    I was trying to rack my brains to remember its proper name so prefetch
    ended up being bashed out on the keys.
     
    Conor, May 1, 2007
    #36
  17. lofty73

    Pete Russell Guest

    Yeah, Vista can do that to ya. :)
     
    Pete Russell, May 2, 2007
    #37
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.