Vista Freecell not operating correctly

Discussion in 'Windows Vista Games' started by mk9lobo, Jan 6, 2009.

  1. mk9lobo

    mk9lobo Guest

    Hi,

    I am not much of a computer person, but like to play Freecell. My
    Vista version has devleoped a glitch...a line of cards appears in
    between the usual sites and cannot be moved normally, therefore making
    the game useless. This happens every time, and starting a new game does
    not correct the stiuation. Can I unistall this game and reinstall from
    back up discs? If so could someone give me detailed directions?
     
    mk9lobo, Jan 6, 2009
    #1
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  2. mk9lobo

    Mark Guest

    Perhaps someone else has has seen this problem, I haven't heard of it. I
    don't know if it will fix it or not, but uninstalling and re-installing
    freecell is easy and won't hurt anything. Depending on your configuration
    you may need your original Vista disk (it will prompt for the disk if it
    needs it)

    1) On the start menu, on the side you should see "Control Panel", click on
    it.
    1a) if the Control Panel link isn't there, use the search box at the bottom
    of the start menu and type in Control Panel

    2) In the Control Panel - if you have "Classic View" selected - run the
    "programs and Features" icon.
    2a) if you have "Control Panel Home" view selected - click on "Programs"
    (not the links under it but the large "Programs" link)

    3) Look for "Turn Windows features on or off" and click it, you should get a
    list of windows features with Games at the top.

    4) click the little plus-sign next to Games to open up the list of installed
    games.

    5) uncheck FreeCell and click OK. it will spend a couple of minutes deleting
    files and then the game is gone.

    to re-install, do the same, just add a checkmark next to FreeCell.

    Note: be careful not to change any other checkmarks, installing or
    uninstalling pieces of Windows must be done carefully and with knowledge of
    what security risks it may introduce.

    let us know if the reinstall fixes the problem.


    Hope that helps!
    Mark
     
    Mark, Jan 7, 2009
    #2
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  3. mk9lobo

    mk9lobo Guest

    I tried that method and no joy. I think this problem happened after
    downloaded SP 1. If I go back to an earlier date it might fix th
    situation but I would still have to reinstall the SP 1. I have back u
    discs but they would not have the update either
     
    mk9lobo, Jan 8, 2009
    #3
  4. You can reinstall it on the windows program's control panel
     
    James Matthews, Feb 14, 2009
    #4
  5. mk9lobo

    CurlieBlond Guest

    I also have the problem and think I inadvertently moved the column while
    trying to make a card transfer. I actually did this twice and one time it
    fixed itself. I tried the reinstall method described and it didn't work.
    Please help me!
     
    CurlieBlond, Mar 11, 2009
    #5
  6. mk9lobo

    haunt Guest

    Want to get rid of Windows Vista? Discovered that none of the software (and even some hardware) you've been using for years is compatible? You're not alone.

    Windows Vista has been out for a year and a half now, and public opinion is still fiercly divided. Those who purchased ultra-fast new computer systems may love it, but the rest of the public, especially those who upgraded an older PC from Windows XP to Windows Vista probably wish they never had.

    It's possible to go back to Windows XP, though it may not be easy. Especially not if you purchased a new system with Windows Vista but now find yourself pining for the easy charms (and fast loading times) of Windows XP.

    Why would anyone want to go back to Windows XP? Well, because it still works just fine.

    After all, you know that Windows XP runs fast, and you know it likes the software applications you've already paid good money for. Windows Vista has a lot of new features, and may prove to be the better OS in the long run, but for right now, many, many users will be better served within the familiar confines of Windows XP.

    First the unfortunate truth: There is no 'undo' button for getting rid of Windows Vista. Sadly, there is no easy way to go back to Windows XP as such. you'll either have to remove the entire operating system and start fresh with Windows XP, or do nothing at all.

    Making Preparations

    Before PCSTATS gets into the nitty-gritty of preparing your computer for a Vista Exorcism, let's go over how to save your essential files, emails and contact information. Vista is going to be completely wiped off your computer forever, so you will need to preserve those precious bits of yourself that are already stored in the ill-fated OS.

    If you've used Windows Mail in Vista and can't afford to be without your valuable email messages and contact info, here's how to back it up. Once backed up you can return it to Outlook Express or Windows Mail installed on Windows XP, for that matter.

    Backing up E-Mail

    Windows Vista stores all emails in the .eml file format at the location 'C:\Users\Username\AppData\Local\Microsoft\WindowsMail\ Local Folders' where 'Username' is the user name that you use in Windows Vista. You will have to enable the viewing of hidden files and folders to navigate to this location. To enable hidden file viewing, open any directory, then go to 'organize/folder and search settings' and click the 'view' tab. Enable the 'view hidden files and folders' option.


    As you can see, the directories here mimic the various mail boxes in Windows Mail. Each contains multiple .eml files which correspond to individual email messages. Their names are not particularly revealing, so if you want to be picky about the messages you save, export the whole lot and delete the ones you don't want later. To export these messages to Windows XP, we simply need to copy the data onto removable media such as a USB drive or burn it to a CD. If you have a second hard disk or partition, you can also move the data to a folder there for safekeeping.
     
    haunt, Apr 17, 2009
    #6
  7. mk9lobo

    Slap Guest

    That would be a silly thing to do.
     
    Slap, Apr 18, 2009
    #7
  8. mk9lobo

    Joe Guest

    Never had a problem with Vista that I could not resolve. Vista has been out
    almost 3 years, Win7 is due out soon, why bother with a downgrade at this
    point?

    I do agree that if you were stupid enough to upgrade from an old XP system,
    then you get what you pay for. Next time try upgrading the hardware with
    the software. You'll have a better experience.
     
    Joe, Apr 23, 2009
    #8
  9. mk9lobo

    JohnWedgwood Guest

    I had the same issue, tried reinstalling freecell, copying files from
    another computer with no luck but finally deleted the saved game under
    users/name/saved games and the problem went away. I had previously
    tried to move to a new game presumably making the saved game useless,
    but that hadn't worked either.
     
    JohnWedgwood, May 8, 2009
    #9
  10. mk9lobo

    Matt Hart Guest

    Right, don't forget the fact that some hardware (such as gasp, motherboards) were not designed to be backwards compatable, and that the people trying to slipstream files into the xp install disc will get to deal with the fun hours-long battle of learning how to do these things.

    Not worth it, just make Vista pretend to be XP, seeing as you can change the settings to almost mimic it visually... less time than it takes to reinstall XP.

    Anywho, for those wondering, a lot of the crap has been fixed in Vista now, and I've only encountered one problem on it since using it on my laptop.
    Want to get rid of Windows Vista? Discovered that none of the software (and even some hardware) you've been using for years is compatible? You're not alone.

    Windows Vista has been out for a year and a half now, and public opinion is still fiercly divided. Those who purchased ultra-fast new computer systems may love it, but the rest of the public, especially those who upgraded an older PC from Windows XP to Windows Vista probably wish they never had.

    It's possible to go back to Windows XP, though it may not be easy. Especially not if you purchased a new system with Windows Vista but now find yourself pining for the easy charms (and fast loading times) of Windows XP.

    Why would anyone want to go back to Windows XP? Well, because it still works just fine.

    After all, you know that Windows XP runs fast, and you know it likes the software applications you've already paid good money for. Windows Vista has a lot of new features, and may prove to be the better OS in the long run, but for right now, many, many users will be better served within the familiar confines of Windows XP.

    First the unfortunate truth: There is no 'undo' button for getting rid of Windows Vista. Sadly, there is no easy way to go back to Windows XP as such. you'll either have to remove the entire operating system and start fresh with Windows XP, or do nothing at all.

    Making Preparations

    Before PCSTATS gets into the nitty-gritty of preparing your computer for a Vista Exorcism, let's go over how to save your essential files, emails and contact information. Vista is going to be completely wiped off your computer forever, so you will need to preserve those precious bits of yourself that are already stored in the ill-fated OS.

    If you've used Windows Mail in Vista and can't afford to be without your valuable email messages and contact info, here's how to back it up. Once backed up you can return it to Outlook Express or Windows Mail installed on Windows XP, for that matter.

    Backing up E-Mail

    Windows Vista stores all emails in the .eml file format at the location 'C:\Users\Username\AppData\Local\Microsoft\WindowsMail\ Local Folders' where 'Username' is the user name that you use in Windows Vista. You will have to enable the viewing of hidden files and folders to navigate to this location. To enable hidden file viewing, open any directory, then go to 'organize/folder and search settings' and click the 'view' tab. Enable the 'view hidden files and folders' option.


    As you can see, the directories here mimic the various mail boxes in Windows Mail. Each contains multiple .eml files which correspond to individual email messages. Their names are not particularly revealing, so if you want to be picky about the messages you save, export the whole lot and delete the ones you don't want later. To export these messages to Windows XP, we simply need to copy the data onto removable media such as a USB drive or burn it to a CD. If you have a second hard disk or partition, you can also move the data to a folder there for safekeeping.
     
    Matt Hart, May 14, 2009
    #10
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