VPN - When connected from remote location, why is the 'Server IP Address' not the actual server's IP

Discussion in 'Windows Small Business Server' started by Alan, Mar 13, 2006.

  1. Alan

    Alan Guest

    Hi All,

    This is just an 'out of interest' type question.

    I connect to our SBS 2003 Premium server using a VPN connection, from
    a Win XP Home client

    If I click on the connection icon in the task bar, and select the
    'details' tab, it lists the 'Server IP Address' as 10.0.0.XX (where XX
    is greater than 10).

    However, the actual server I am connecting to has an IP in the range
    (10.0.0.1 to 10.0.0.9)

    What is going on there?

    Thanks,

    Alan.

    --

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    Alan, Mar 13, 2006
    #1
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  2. Alan

    Joe Guest

    The VPN connection does not terminate on the server LAN IP address.
    It is a PPP (Point-to-Point Protocol) link which is a tiny network with
    two nodes. Both nodes are assigned by SBS from its pool of VPN
    addresses. While the link is up, both the SBS and the remote computer
    have an additional network interface, and routing between this
    interface and others can be controlled. That is why the main network
    interface (and any others, for that matter) of a client computer must be
    in a different subnet to the SBS, so the client computer knows which
    interface (main or VPN) to send messages to.

    It's possible to make the VPN pool of addresses whatever you like, so
    that they are not in the same subnet as the SBS LAN. You would do this
    if you wanted to isolate the VPN link from the LAN, so only the server
    itself was accessible over the link.
     
    Joe, Mar 13, 2006
    #2
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  3. Alan

    Alan Guest


    Superb reply Joe - Thanks!


    --

    The views expressed are my own, and not those of my employer or anyone
    else associated with me.

    My current valid email address is:



    This is valid as is. It is not munged, or altered at all.

    It will be valid for AT LEAST one month from the date of this post.

    If you are trying to contact me after that time,
    it MAY still be valid, but may also have been
    deactivated due to spam. If so, and you want
    to contact me by email, try searching for a
    more recent post by me to find my current
    email address.

    The following is a (probably!) totally unique
    and meaningless string of characters that you
    can use to find posts by me in a search engine:

    ewygchvboocno43vb674b6nq46tvb
     
    Alan, Mar 14, 2006
    #3
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