Which Version of Vista Provides the Highest Level for Online Secur

Discussion in 'Windows Vista General Discussion' started by FireWall2, Jan 14, 2007.

  1. FireWall2

    FireWall2 Guest

    Which Version of Vista provides the highest level for online security, 32-bit
    or 64-bit ?

    Or, is each Version, 32-bit and 64-bit Vista equal with providing online
    security ?
     
    FireWall2, Jan 14, 2007
    #1
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  2. FireWall2

    BillD Guest

    All Windows Vista editions have the same core, so the on-line security is
    almost the same. In addition a 64bit version gives more protection thanks to
    Patchguard that gives better kernel memory protection of processes
     
    BillD, Jan 14, 2007
    #2
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  3. Richard G. Harper, Jan 14, 2007
    #3
  4. FireWall2

    LoneWolf Guest

    FireWall2:

    The best place to get your answer is "Vista Help &
    Support". You have told us that so many times, it
    must be so !

    In the mean-time, get ride of that 'Disclaimer'. It
    has absolutely no legal standing, and since you
    are in the 'legal profession', you should be able to
    come up with something better than that.

    regards

    LoneWolf
    B.Bus; LLB; M.Bus

    '''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''
     
    LoneWolf, Jan 14, 2007
    #4
  5. FireWall2

    Peter Foldes Guest

    Only you can . Both versions are the same in this regard. Security depends on the individual and his finger as to where and how he uses the mouse to click to open something's.
     
    Peter Foldes, Jan 14, 2007
    #5
  6. FireWall2

    FireWall2 Guest

    Bild,

    Thank you for your correct response.

    Although, 64-bit, as you suggested, does indeed provide additional Security
    opposed to 32-bit Vista, thanks to "Patchguard".
     
    FireWall2, Jan 14, 2007
    #6
  7. FireWall2

    FireWall2 Guest

    Hello Richard G. Harper,

    As a MVP your knowledge of Vista greatly needs improving,

    As MVP, your Post can tarnish the integrity and reputation of Microsoft.

    The below is a small excerpt extracted from Microsoft, courtesy Jim Allchin.

    The true purpose for my Post was for deterring how many people are aware of
    the inherent Security provided by Vista; and the factual differences between
    32-bit and 64-bit Vista.

    Specifically learning how many, if any, MVPs are fully aware of Vista’s
    inherent Security. Seems as if my curiosity has been somewhat addressed,
    also, guessed at, for the characteristic differences between 32-bit Vista and
    64-bit Vista.

    Much more specific Vista technology easily could have been included within
    this Post, respecting time and space, for now, this should be adequate.
    Apologize for the loaded (Post) question. My reason, too many people within
    this Forum display a great lack of understanding regarding Vista's inherent
    Ultimate Security.

    Te below is selected text (the gist) for how 64-bit Vista provides the
    highest level of Protections (online or off-line) compared to 32-bit Vista.

    Below, Microsoft's (Jim Allchin) Response:
    Kernel Patch Protection also makes PCs more secure by helping protect
    against potentially malicious software known as rootkits, which modify the
    kernel in an attempt to hide from detection.

    Kernel Patch Protection is not new. Last year it was built into the 64-bit
    versions of Windows XP and Windows Server 2003. With Windows Vista, Kernel
    Patch Protection will likewise be incorporated into **64-bit versions only.**
    (emphasis added)

    We have been exploring ways to implement Kernel Patch Protection on 32-bit
    Windows systems, but have not done this yet, although some customers have
    requested it, because of limitations of the 32-bit architecture and because
    it will cause compatibility issues for some applications and devices that are
    already in use. In adapting applications and devices to take advantage of
    64-bit Windows, on the other hand, developers have an opportunity to resolve
    these compatibility issues.

    Some security vendors have asked Microsoft to provide instructions on how to
    disable Kernel Patch Protection in 64-bit versions of Windows, because their
    products include some features that modify the Windows kernel in undocumented
    and unsupported ways. Making exceptions and allowing some vendors special
    access to modify the Windows Vista kernel is unworkable. It opens the door
    wide for malicious software.

    For example, rootkits could be designed to present themselves to the
    operating system in the guise of a legitimate application that was given
    special access. Also, making exceptions will prolong the reliability problems
    that are caused by unsupported kernel modification, such as when multiple
    applications compete to patch the same kernel interfaces.

    In the case of security solutions, unsupported kernel modifications also
    limit your choices, by making it extremely difficult or impossible for
    multiple security solutions to co-exist reliably on a system. We want to work
    with security providers to make common extensions available, so that any
    security vendors can use them, and so that security software does not itself
    put your security and reliability at risk from malicious kernel modifications.

    Here is what we are doing to maintain the integrity and security of 64-bit
    Windows, while still addressing the needs of our security partners:

    • Contrary to some media reports, Microsoft will not weaken the security of
    64-bit Windows by enabling some applications to modify the kernel of the
    operating system.

    • We have applied our no-exceptions policy against kernel patching to
    Microsoft applications as well as third party applications,

    ***No application can bypass or weaken Kernel Patch Protection***—this is
    essential to improving security and reliability for you. Note that many
    third-party security companies provide highly competitive products without
    modifying the Windows kernel in unsupported ways. (above emphasis added)










    --
    Firewall

    Disclaimer:
    Accept Vista as it is, or, Abandon Vista


     
    FireWall2, Jan 14, 2007
    #7
  8. FireWall2

    FireWall2 Guest

    Hello Peter Foldes,

    Respectfully, your knowledge of Vista greatly needs improving.

    A MVP Posting *wrong* information can tarnish the integrity and reputation
    of Microsoft.

    The below is a small excerpt extracted from Microsoft, courtesy Jim Allchin.

    The true purpose for my Post was for deterring how many people are aware of
    the inherent Security provided by Vista; and the factual differences between
    32-bit and 64-bit Vista.

    Specifically learning how many, if any, MVPs are fully aware of Vista’s
    inherent Security. Seems as if my curiosity has been somewhat addressed,
    also, guessed at, for the characteristic differences between 32-bit Vista and
    64-bit Vista.

    Much more specific Vista technology easily could have been included within
    this Post, respecting time and space, for now, this should be adequate.
    Apologize for the loaded (Post) question. My reason, too many people within
    this Forum display a great lack of understanding regarding Vista's inherent
    Ultimate Security.

    Te below is selected text (the gist) for how 64-bit Vista provides the
    highest level of Protections (online or off-line) compared to 32-bit Vista.

    Below, Microsoft's (Jim Allchin) Response:
    Kernel Patch Protection also makes PCs more secure by helping protect
    against potentially malicious software known as rootkits, which modify the
    kernel in an attempt to hide from detection.

    Kernel Patch Protection is not new. Last year it was built into the 64-bit
    versions of Windows XP and Windows Server 2003. With Windows Vista, Kernel
    Patch Protection will likewise be incorporated into **64-bit versions only.**
    (emphasis added)

    We have been exploring ways to implement Kernel Patch Protection on 32-bit
    Windows systems, but have not done this yet, although some customers have
    requested it, because of limitations of the 32-bit architecture and because
    it will cause compatibility issues for some applications and devices that are
    already in use. In adapting applications and devices to take advantage of
    64-bit Windows, on the other hand, developers have an opportunity to resolve
    these compatibility issues.

    Some security vendors have asked Microsoft to provide instructions on how to
    disable Kernel Patch Protection in 64-bit versions of Windows, because their
    products include some features that modify the Windows kernel in undocumented
    and unsupported ways. Making exceptions and allowing some vendors special
    access to modify the Windows Vista kernel is unworkable. It opens the door
    wide for malicious software.

    For example, rootkits could be designed to present themselves to the
    operating system in the guise of a legitimate application that was given
    special access. Also, making exceptions will prolong the reliability problems
    that are caused by unsupported kernel modification, such as when multiple
    applications compete to patch the same kernel interfaces.

    In the case of security solutions, unsupported kernel modifications also
    limit your choices, by making it extremely difficult or impossible for
    multiple security solutions to co-exist reliably on a system. We want to work
    with security providers to make common extensions available, so that any
    security vendors can use them, and so that security software does not itself
    put your security and reliability at risk from malicious kernel modifications.

    Here is what we are doing to maintain the integrity and security of 64-bit
    Windows, while still addressing the needs of our security partners:

    • Contrary to some media reports, *** Microsoft will not weaken the security
    of 64-bit Windows by enabling some applications to modify the kernel of the
    operating system. *** (emphasis added)

    • *** We have applied our no-exceptions policy against kernel patching to
    Microsoft applications as well as third party applications *** (emphasis
    added)

    *** No application can bypass or weaken Kernel Patch Protection ***—this is
    essential to improving security and reliability for you. Note that many
    third-party security companies provide highly competitive products without
    modifying the Windows kernel in unsupported ways. (above emphasis added)
     
    FireWall2, Jan 14, 2007
    #8
  9. FireWall2

    Kerry Brown Guest

    You really need to change your tune. Do you really think that all of the
    people trying to show you the errors of your perception of the way security
    in Vista works are wrong? You need to do some more detailed technical
    research rather than relying on press releases for your information. You
    quote people you have never met as if you know them personally. When you are
    called on this you ignore it and start quoting someone else. Please cease
    and desist from posting bad advice and false information.
     
    Kerry Brown, Jan 14, 2007
    #9
  10. FireWall2

    Robert Firth Guest

    A Post from a MVP, containing *wrong* information can tarnish the integrity
    Remember, MVPs are in no way representatives of Microsoft. In general, they
    people who have provided beneficial assistence in the newsgroups over a long
    term period.

    --
    /* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
    * Robert Firth *
    * Windows Vista x86 RTM *
    * http://www.WinVistaInfo.org *
    * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * */
     
    Robert Firth, Jan 14, 2007
    #10
  11. FireWall2

    FireWall2 Guest

    Hello Kerry Brown,

    Respectfully, the gross lack of knowledge demonstrated by some MVPs
    (not-paid and not-employees of Microsoft) within these Forums, regarding
    Vista and BitLocker, is simply appalling and disgraceful for Microsoft's
    integrity and reputation.

    Something must be done for rectifying that very serious mistake, ASAP !!!
     
    FireWall2, Jan 14, 2007
    #11
  12. Actually, x64 operating systems can leverage the advanced security features
    of the newest 64bit cpu's.

     
    Colin Barnhorst, Jan 14, 2007
    #12
  13. FireWall2

    FireWall2 Guest

    Hello Robert Firth,

    Since http://windowshelp.microsoft.com/communities/newsgroups is indeed a
    Microsoft Based Web Site, the MVPs indeed are ** representatives ** of
    Microsoft.

    Yes, the MVPs are * not-paid - and - not-employees * of Microsoft.

    Instead, MVPs are volunteers; many offering personal dogma, not factual
    Technical Information gleaned from Microsoft.

    Some MVPs are simply down right arrogant, insulting, and rude when they do
    not have the knowledge for addressing specific Microsoft user issues. The
    secondary results, an enormous disgrace for Microsoft's integrity and
    reputation.
     
    FireWall2, Jan 14, 2007
    #13
  14. Richard G. Harper, Jan 14, 2007
    #14
  15. FireWall2

    FireWall2 Guest

    Kerry Brown,

    Any person that has the audacity and boldness for discrediting statements
    from Jim Allchin and Mike Nash has no right for making Posts within these
    Forums, specifically certain MVPs. The secondary results are more than
    reprehensible; those MVPs should forever be removed from these Forums due to
    their disrespect toward Microsoft.

    Just because I am acquainted with people that you are not acquainted means
    absolutely nothing, other than complete nonsense gibberish hot-air filled
    enormous lack of knowledge, specifically regarding Vista and BitLocker.

    Immediately, something must be done rectifying that gross error within
    certain MVPs.

    Respectfully,
     
    FireWall2, Jan 14, 2007
    #15
  16. Jupiter Jones [MVP], Jan 15, 2007
    #16
  17. "Just because I am acquainted with people that you are not..."
    More of this anonymous name dropping.
    You have already shown this to fiction.
    Your denials fool no one except possibly yourself.

    "...has no right for making Posts within these Forums"
    And now you determine who has rights to post?
    NO, you DON'T.
    You can not make the determination since you do not own these newsgroups.
    You do NOT have that right.
    You are NOT Microsoft.
     
    Jupiter Jones [MVP], Jan 15, 2007
    #17
  18. FireWall2

    Peter Foldes Guest

    Answers are inline


    I doubt it

    I am not an MVP
    Explain it to me\us in your own layman words on what the above means. If you copy someone's statement then make sure that you understand it.

    This is a vain attempt of copying someone's quote by someone that is not understanding it correctly



    Do you know what is Kernel? I doubt it. Do not rush to look it up and post it . Your understanding of the Kerenel seems to be non existant as it looks like in your posting.


    The line above is from me and taken\copied from another post where I have posted it


    --
    Peter

    Please Reply to Newsgroup for the benefit of others
    Requests for assistance by email can not and will not be acknowledged.





     
    Peter Foldes, Jan 15, 2007
    #18
  19. Is that because it pleases you to view MVP's that way? I realize I am
    asking a rhetorical question, but anytime someone makes such a sweeping
    statement I think it is made to serve their own prejudices and not as
    factual experience.
     
    Colin Barnhorst, Jan 15, 2007
    #19
  20. Is this your official polling station now?

    --


    Regards,

    Richard Urban
    Microsoft MVP Windows Shell/User
    (For email, remove the obvious from my address)

    Quote from George Ankner:
    If you knew as much as you think you know,
    You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!
     
    Richard Urban, Jan 15, 2007
    #20
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