Wise Registry Cleaner vs AusLogics Registry Defrag vs CCLeaner?

Discussion in 'Windows Vista Performance' started by Coderedpl, Sep 24, 2008.

  1. Not "options"... items that needed to be "cleaned".
     
    Paul Montgomery, Sep 26, 2008
    #21
    1. Advertisements

  2. Coderedpl

    flamingatom Guest

    I highly use lots of different registry cleaners, and im recently using
    uniblue powersuite, registry mechanic, registry first aid platinum
    registry repair, registry easy, registry genius, registry fix, ccleaner
    And it affects my whole system performance up to 300% mor
     
    flamingatom, Sep 30, 2008
    #22
    1. Advertisements

  3. Change your nick to "flamingidiot".
     
    Paul Montgomery, Sep 30, 2008
    #23
  4. Coderedpl

    winkygiser Guest

    I've tried *'digeus registry cleaner' (http://www.digeus.com)* on Vist
    x32. Can't compare with any other cleaners, cause there are not so man
    of them whitch support Vista, but this was quite nice
     
    winkygiser, Sep 30, 2008
    #24

  5. What benchmarking utility did you use to verify this monumental
    performance gain? Please provide the before and after longs so others
    can verify your claimed results.

    Or did you instead use an independent testing laboratory to establish
    the "300%" figure?

    No intelligent individual capable of critical thinking, much less any
    experienced computer professional, is going to believe your claims until
    you can offer objective evidence in support thereof.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/555375

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. ~Benjamin Franklin

    Many people would rather die than think; in fact, most do. ~Bertrand Russell

    The philosopher has never killed any priests, whereas the priest has
    killed a great many philosophers.
    ~ Denis Diderot
     
    Bruce Chambers, Oct 3, 2008
    #25
  6. Coderedpl

    hypsophrys Guest

    hi all. long time listener... actually, just breezing through and had
    to stop, register, and say *something* about the madness here. :)

    i'm a developer with ~15 years experience writing code for (mostly)
    windows. i currently run a team of guys that develops laboratory
    applications using c# (.net).

    there seems to be a culture of fear around registry tools. this is not
    entirely unhealthy, especially considering some of the horror stories
    we've all heard, but there are some valid reasons why keeping your
    registry maintained is good for system performance.

    these tools are certainly not for the faint of heart, nor the
    technically challenged. i also can't speak as to the logic (or lack
    thereof) used by any particular tool - as i haven't reviewed any source
    code. in fact, i came upon this because i am looking for a tool that i
    might have some faith in - we'll see. anyway, my opinion here is more
    philosophical, with a technical slant.

    the windows registry is a database. it is a tree structured container
    for simple data types, many of which are cross-references to other
    locations in the tree. others are pointers to file locations and other
    resources, and the remainder are basically configuration parameters...
    relationships/pointers are unenforced - meaning that a target can
    disappear, change, or move, and there is nothing to guarantee the
    pointer will be updated - that only happens if the software (or person)
    doing the modification is particularly conscientious.

    inconsistencies are common and quite problematic with databases, even
    those used only by a single application that follows consistent rules -
    stuff happens and data does get corrupted.

    the registry, though, is *not* a single-application database. it's
    highly shared, allowing unrestricted read/write access from multiple
    consumers (all the software which has installed itself on your machine,
    and any running application or service). this is bad news, and the
    inconsistencies pile up pretty quickly.

    why are inconsistencies bad? they can cause error conditions for any
    application (including windows and subsystems) that attempt to enumerate
    or access affected key(s). application errors usually have associated
    exception handlers -- extra code which has to run, and either workaround
    the problem or somehow log/notify, then continue. if the application
    doesn't have a handler, it will probably cause the OS to have to deal
    with a terminating app... in any case, exceptions slow software down.

    now, all that said, just removing a bad reference (even cascading this
    operation, by running a cleaner multiple times as suggested by someone
    earlier) doesn't necessarily fix a problem. it might, as many
    applications will ignore or recreate missing keys, or even notify the
    user that a reinstall/repair is needed. some, however, won't. and may
    still have problems - but probably nothing worse than you already had.
    in my experience as a windows user, and from the perspective of someone
    who's had to write exception logic, a missing reference is better than
    an inconsistent one.

    HTH

    --ian
     
    hypsophrys, Jan 12, 2009
    #26
  7. If only that were true. Instead, all too many naive users fall for the
    blandishments of snake oil salesmen and use automated registry cleaners
    to hose their systems.





    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/555375

    They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary
    safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. ~Benjamin Franklin

    Many people would rather die than think; in fact, most do. ~Bertrand Russell

    The philosopher has never killed any priests, whereas the priest has
    killed a great many philosophers.
    ~ Denis Diderot
     
    Bruce Chambers, Jan 16, 2009
    #27
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.