Workstations not logging on to new windows2003 server.

Discussion in 'Server Setup' started by TonyV, Dec 20, 2004.

  1. TonyV

    TonyV Guest

    My company will be switching over form NT4 Server to Windows2003 soon on new
    server

    hardware. All workstations are running Windows XP Pro (with local profiles).

    I loaded a testbox with server2003 as a domain controller (same domain name
    as on NT4

    server), created a new user account on windows2003 (with same username &
    password as on

    NT4 Server).
    Then connected it via crossover cable to one of the current xp PC's (sp2
    loaded) to see

    if it would log onto the new server.

    I could not get the workstation to log on unless I make it a workgroup
    member & then

    re-join the domain. It then creates a new local profile and logs in perfectly.
    Once the workstation rebooted after the 1st logon, it does not log on
    successfully

    again. The event viewer shows entries that it could not find the domain
    controller.

    I was hoping that all the current XP PC's would log on to the new
    windows2003 server,

    using same settings & credentials without a hitch, but this does not seem to
    be the

    case. I also want to use the same domain name.

    It also seems that I might have to recreate all the local profiles again.

    Can somebody please explain to me what the problem is here?...and give some
    advice.

    Secondly, will it be wise to consider using roaming profiles? I'm concerned
    about the

    additional server load, storage requirements & network traffic that roaming
    profiles

    might create.

    Your assistance will be much appreciated.
     
    TonyV, Dec 20, 2004
    #1
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  2. TonyV

    Miha Pihler Guest

    Hi Tony

    What is describe is expected behavior. You created _new_ domain and of
    course you can't just logon with PC from old domain to new domain without
    first joining it to new domain.

    To achieve what you need (e.g. same name, no new profiles, no need for
    disjoining server from current domain) you will have to upgrade your current
    domain (your NT domain to Windows 2003 domain) and not setup new domain.

    Here is a good guide how to upgrade NT domain to Windows 2003 domain.

    Upgrading Windows NT 4.0 Domains to Windows Server 2003 Active Directory
    http://www.microsoft.com/resources/...all/deployguide/en-us/dssbe_upnt_overview.asp

    Feel free to post back with any questions that you might have...

    I hope this helps,

    Mike
     
    Miha Pihler, Dec 20, 2004
    #2
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  3. TonyV

    TonyV Guest

    Hi Miha,

    I don't think an upgrade would work well as Win2k3 will be loaded on new
    server hardware.
    I would also prefer to do a fresh install of Win2k3 so it will be new &
    fresh, although it will take longer to get everything configured the way it
    used to be. I do not like upgrades to much as the final product are not
    always stable.

    I changed the domain name on my win2k3 testbox to something different. Then
    let my XP PC join that domain. It works, but the logon takes about 3
    minutes...not sure why?

    We only have a single domain in our company & there are only 55 users in
    total.
     
    TonyV, Dec 21, 2004
    #3
  4. TonyV

    Miha Pihler Guest

    Hi,

    My answers are in-line...

    You can do the upgrade (if you want) on "temporary" hardware and after you
    upgrade your domain move all the roles to new hardware and clean
    installation of OS.
    Make sure you have your DNS setup correctly. Is your Active Directory (AD)
    server also a DNS server?
    How is DNS set on AD under TCP/IP properties? Does it point to Active
    Directory DNS (in general this would be your Active Directory server). On
    Windows 2003 server you can simply enter 127.0.0.1 if DNS is running on same
    server as AD.
    Same is with clients. They also have to point to your Active Directory DNS
    server (e.g. your Active Directory server). Check under TCP/IP configuration
    and make sure that preferred DNS point to your AD DNS server.
    This setting should not point to e.g. your ISP or you will experience long
    logon times and other problems with domain clients.

    I hope this helps,

    Mike
     
    Miha Pihler, Dec 22, 2004
    #4
  5. TonyV

    TonyV Guest

    Hi,

    I'm not quite sure how to move the roles to the new hardware & clean O/S.
    Please advise...

    Secondly...Yes, the AD server is also the DNS server. I simply have the
    server IP address as the the DNS address as well (with no forwarding).
    My XP client is indeed pointing at the ISP DNS. So how then would the client
    point to the ISP?
     
    TonyV, Dec 22, 2004
    #5
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